1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Spacve heater

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Go Fish, Sep 16, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Go Fish

    Go Fish Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2006
    Messages:
    211
    Winter is coming. I am looking for a small space heater to use in living room when watching T.V. Nothing too expensive.. A few years ago I had an oil type heater and is leaked. Now have big spot in carpet so I would like to stay away from oil heaters. Any ideas?

    Ed Fish
    Racine, WI
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,429
    Stop at a yard sale and get an electric one for a few bucks. HMB
     
  3. Remstar311

    Remstar311 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    942
    You can buy a new electric one with a thermostat and tip over detector. Overheat shut off etc. for like 40 bucks.
     
  4. oldgahchamp

    oldgahchamp Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,263
    If it were me, I would buy 1 or 2 "Pelonis" ceramic electric heaters or something of that type. They work fine, but remember to grease up your electric meter when using electric heat. Our house is total electric and in the dead of Winter if I didn't burn lots of wood, I would be looking at $500/month electric bills. Larry Evans
     
  5. quartering

    quartering Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    1,440
    nasa needed a heater for the astronauts on the space shuttle that didn't involve a bunch of glowing, red hot wires. pelonis came up with the ceramic disc heater. instead of air blowing across a red hot wire, heat blows through a bunch of small, heated ceramic tubes. the longer the air is in contact with the heat source, the hotter the air gets. a glowing red wire will heat air blown over it to 120 degrees. the air blown through the ceramic tubes of a pelonis is heated up to 250 degrees. basic combustion of materials, like tissue paper, begins around 400 degrees. a red hot wire is about 450 degrees. the hottest part of the pelonis heater is just over 200 degrees. the pelonis disc heater has the smallest size for the amount of heat it produces. if it's not a pelonis ceramic disk heater, it's just a cheap piece of junk with just enough ceramic in it to say that it's a ceramic heater. there's only one genuine ceramic disc heater. it's a pelonis. it's a little pricey. you'll be amazed by it's performance. you'll love it. good luck with it
     
  6. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,651
    Just remember watts in = BTUs out!

    They all use the same amount of electricity at a given heat output! It doesn't matter if they are cheap or expensive heaters!
     
  7. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    6,246
    Ahab, haven't you heard? Amish craftsmen found a way to circumvent the laws of thermodynamics.

    -Gary
     
  8. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,804
    Ahab is right, there is no magic unless you are Amish. The cheapest way is probably to just turn up the thermostat. Electric heat is not cheap.

    An oil heater in the living room? I would be more worried about a big spot on my lungs than the carpet, not to mention brain damage.

    A small electric blanket may be the best way to go. You'll be snug.
     
  9. quartering

    quartering Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    1,440
    what's a btu?
     
  10. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    17,209
    Location:
    IL(The gun friendly Southern Part)
    BTU = British Thermal Unit

    It is approximately the amount of energy needed to heat 1 pound (0.454 kg) of water.
     
  11. quartering

    quartering Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    1,440
    nasa. amish. i can see how you could get confused
     
  12. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,241
    Location:
    In the Cabana
    It doesn't make any difference how you do it, 1 watt equals 3.41 btu's except for the Amish

    Actually if you house is heater with straight resistance heat, you save no money by turning off lights, they produce heat

    But one thing you might want to keep in mind unless you are sure that you have a 20 amp circuit, you need to get no larger than 1350 watts, because a resistive load on an electrical circuit needs to be multiplied by 125% to be operated safely

    Per NEC Article 422, paragraph 422.10

    If you use a 1500 watt heater on a 15 amp circuit, if the heater runs for long periods, the conductor will probably over heat and could start a fire

    Just some info
     
  13. John Galt

    John Galt TS Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2011
    Messages:
    2,788
    You will be lucky to find a space heater that doesn't put out 1,500 watts (12.5 amps) of heat. Most household circuits are 15 amp so it seems reasonable to assume that that's what they are made for. In any case, make sure and not have anything else drawing power from that circuit while the heater is drawing 12.5 amps or you will blow a breaker for sure.
     
  14. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,241
    Location:
    In the Cabana
    There are a lot of them that are 1350 watt, might have to look somewhere other than Wally world, but I have bough a couple there that were 1350 watt before

    A 1500 watt heater at 120 volts takes 12.5 amps, but when you add the 125% as required in the code, the amp draw is 15.625 amps

    And just suppose it's an older house with Zinsco or Federal Pacific breakers that are notorius for not tripping, it could cause a serious problem

    But I was just trying to give the man a heads up, seems a few people on this sight think that just because they have dodged the bullet most of their life they are bullet proof, but they write the codes for a reason

    I have seen houses that burnt down for just the reason I wrote, but if you want to think you know it all press on cowboy

    I've been doing this stuff for close to 40 yrs, so I do have some experiance
     
  15. ctreay

    ctreay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    606
    Location:
    Northern New York
    We had a side porch on our old house that we renovated into a den/office. It is outside of the homes foundation so I could not easily run a heat duct from the furnace. The first year we had a Kerosun heater, very hard to regulate temps and when spring came everything in the room and the adjoining room had an oily film. Everything smelled like kerosene, wife said the heater had to go. We put in a wall mounted 220 volt heater with a thermostat, easy to install, just pick a spot and screw it to the wall. One small hole through the floor and one through the stone wall for the wire. My wife watches the bills pretty close and we don't think that the the difference in the elect bill was any more than the cost of the kerosene and there is no smell or film.

    ctreay
     
  16. John Galt

    John Galt TS Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2011
    Messages:
    2,788
    Heck, I've see houses burned down for dozens of reasons. Perhaps there are lots of 1350 amp heaters various places but I've seen very few of them where I live. About 95% of the ones I've seen and all the ones I've bought are the 1500w variety. I'm not interested in an argument, just reporting what I've seen.

    Out of curiosity and fear of burning down my 2 houses and travel trailer I asked the fire chief today how many houses he knows of that have burned down because of a 1500w heater. He had never heard of that but did know of a few fires started by using a 16 ga extension cord to power the heater.

    While I make no claims to "know it all" and would never want to offend an expert with many decades of experience, I'd think that circuit breakers that won't trip would be a serious fire hazard irrespective of heaters. It's not diffiult to overload a circuit since most people believe that if it will plug in, it should run OK. My daughters have tried to run 2 hair dryers at the same time on the same circuit and learned that it doesn't work well. Ditto for one hair dryer and one hair straightner. BTW, those hair dryers and the hair straightner also draw 1500 watts each, as does every hair dryer my wife has ever owned. It doesn't take 40 years of experience to know that you can't draw 25 amps from a 15 amp circuit without something happening! At least I know that that circuit breaker works.
     
  17. quartering

    quartering Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    1,440
    a watt is a unit of power. a btu is a unit of energy. and neither is a measure of heat output. yet, somehow, a ceramic disc heater puts out twice the amount of heat as a milk house heater. and still only uses the same amount of electricity! what's up with that?
     
  18. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,241
    Location:
    In the Cabana
    Quarting it's just magic, I think the Amish have even more magic

    John Galt, I wasn't trying to start anything this happens every year it seems this question comes up, I just want to let people know how to make sure every thing is safe, there are still alot of Federal Pacific and Zinsco breakers that were installed in the 70-80's they are terrible, I've seen their 15 amp breakers not trip when the circuit was directly shorted to ground.

    The conductors used for resistance heat need to be over sized to compensate for the heat they will produce

    Both companies built breakers that had the UL label on them but were never tested by a third party testing facility, both companies have gone out of business since, but their product is still in many many houses, and they are unsafe

    You can google it and you'll get more info

    I was just giving some advise, I wouldn't want anybody to burn their house down or get hurt just because they weren't aware of the danger
     
  19. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,645
    quartering:

    You're close but...

    In the context of this thread, a watt is a unit of electrical energy equal to one amp of current flowing through a potential differential of one volt.



    A btu is the amount of heat energy required to increase the temperature of one pound of water from 39 to 40 degrees F.

    One kilowatt-hour of electricity (a thousand watts for one hour) converts to 3412 btus of heat.

    Your wife's hair dryer is resistance heat but part of each kilowatt-hour it consumes runs the blower. In other words, the hair dryer isn't 100% efficient at converting electricity to heat. A ceramic space heater OTOH, would be close to 100%.

    sissy
     
  20. quartering

    quartering Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    1,440
    you're still missing the point: it's not about energy conversions. it's about efficiency of design. a ceramic disc produces 250 degree heat. a glowing red wire heater only produces 120 degree heat. thus, the ceramic disc design is twice as energy efficient as the glowing red wire because less energy is wasted in the delivery system. think about it: what do you look for in a heater? now, do you want to pay for 120 degree heat for one hour or 250 degree heat for one half hour? good luck with it
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.