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Solid Ribs

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Voolfie, May 10, 2011.

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  1. Voolfie

    Voolfie Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
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    Location:
    Wilmington, DE
    I'm thinking about buying an old Winchester M12 'Heavy Duck'. It would, in my opinion, be a great trap gun - in addition to (obviously) being a great duck gun. My question for the collective wisdom here at TS.com is this: I've heard that solid rib guns (as opposed to ventilated rib guns) permit visual distortion created by a hot barrel. At what point does this become a problem: 100 targets? 200 targets?

    I should probably add that I'm not a "serious" (ATA-style) trap shooter and that I regularly compete with an original 1906-vintage Winchester 1897 trap gun, a 1922-vintage A.H. Fox 'J' grade trap gun and a 1960-vintage Aguirre & Aranzabal sidelock pigeon gun.

    Any useful input would be appreciated.

    Thanks,

    J.F. Wolfington
    Philadelphia, PA
     
  2. Hitapair

    Hitapair Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    In my opinion it wouldn't be any different than what you are experiencing when you shoot your M97 which doesn't have a VR unless an aftermarket one was added.
     
  3. sernv99

    sernv99 Active Member

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    Vent rib, whether side rib or top rib, does not do squat with getting rid of those "heat waves", IMO. This past weekend I was shooting my 28 gauge (K20). Here is a gun with no side ribs and a good sized height vented top rib. The "heat waves' were clearly visible and creating a visual distortion after 100 rounds. And the temperature was in the mid 70s, sunny, no humidity. Of course I was shooting straight through a sporting clays course without stopping (except to walk to the next station) to let my barrels cool down. Thus if you don't want to see visual distortion, I think you need to take a break every now and then to let your barrels cool down.
     
  4. ExFedex

    ExFedex Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    For occasional trapshooting the Duck gun is a real performer. With that slug of lead in the buttstock and the thicker barrel its a pass shooters dream but not something for a 100 bird event on a hot day. Mine was a 32" solid rib and the barrel got quite hot after 25 targets. Have a Model 97 for my nostalgia days now.
     
  5. below 0

    below 0 TS Member

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    Jan 15, 2009
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    240
    The only downfall I can think of other than the weight, is that a solid rib will be effected more by wind. If you arn't a ATA shooter and don't shoot in all weather, then it shouldn't make a difference. Odie
     
  6. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I'd wager a large sum of money that there isn't a shooter out there that could tell the difference b/w a solid rib and vent rib when it comes to WIND RESISTANCE. Thanks for the giggle though.
     
  7. larryjk

    larryjk Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Many, many years ago I was shooting a Field grade Model 12 (30"barrel with solid rib)at a "meat" shoot in January in Colorado. It was "cold". After about 15 shots the front half of the barrel was not visible due to the heat waves in the cold air. I got myself a factory trap gun with a ventilated rib for those games instead of using the field gun.
     
  8. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    3,650
    On a hot day, carry along a damp towel. A few quick wipes of the barrel ... and it cools right down!
     
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