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So what do you do with the left arm (hand)?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by starship, Apr 30, 2008.

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  1. starship

    starship TS Member

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    Watching a couple of videos (trap) and they address feet, stance, head, body angle, etc. Both mention that the right elbow (right hand shooter) should be parallel with the ground.

    Neither video states just what the positon is for the left elbow.
    Is it also parallel? Straight down? Angle in between?

    What about the left-hand? Should it be at the far end of the forearm, in the middle or closer to the trigger?

    Chuck
     
  2. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    starship, sent you a PM guy. Hap
     
  3. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Comfort and balance is kind of up to you BUT you will find the gun will tend to swing faster if you move the off hand back toward the receiver and slower if you reach out toward the muzzle.....Bob Dodd
     
  4. IM390

    IM390 Member

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    The elbow of the left arm is to form a 90 degree angle and it's purpose is to balance and support the majority of the gun weight according to the US Civilian Marksmanship Program. The longer you extend your left arm the slower and smoother your swing will be and the shorter or closer to the trigger guard the the faster the swing, but also the greater chance of jerking the gun or having uncontrollable muzzle jump. Now the controvercy is whether the left hand index finger ought to point parallel with the barrel. Frank Little, Chris Batha and others says that will prevent flinching on hard left and right hand shots. Still, D. Lee Braun, Reinders and others contend you keep your four fingers together on the side of the stock, like holding an egg in the palm of your hand, so you don't grip the forend too tight.
     
  5. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    I keep my left arm at a 45 degree angle or therebouts. My index finger is pointed toward the muzzle with the palm on the bottom of the forearm, and the left thumb pointed to the left of the forearm. I do not cluch the forearm, but rest it on my palm in about the middle of the stock. Works for me.
     
  6. otnot

    otnot Active Member

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    You don't want to know! Sorry I couldn't resist.
     
  7. Jeff P

    Jeff P Well-Known Member

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    Otnot...I resisted all day, and i can do so no longer.

    Personally, I use my left hand to pull the damn trigger. I know most of you don't, however.

    Now, my right arm I try to keep nice and high - parallel to the ground, if that makes sense.
     
  8. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I use a firm semi-circular grip while moving my arm to and fro.
     
  9. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Brian- You should never move your arm "to and fro". The arms must remain fixed and all movement restricted to the upper or lower body. "Arm shooting" does not work.

    Because all movement is made in the central body, not the arms, the position of the left hand will not make any difference in how fast the gun moves.

    Pat Ireland
     
  10. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    I was taught years ago when that the left hand should be placed farther out on the fore-end to eliminate "steering" the gun with the left arm. As Pat Ireland says all movement should be controlled by the body not the arms. Placing the left hand out towards the end of the fore-end makes it more difficult to push the gun with your left arm.
     
  11. Andy44

    Andy44 Active Member

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    Pat-

    I think Brian is talking about another "sport"! (hehehe)

    AndyH
     
  12. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    Pat, I think Brian is one up on you.......lol lol

    Please re-read what he said.......lol lol


    Hauxfan!
     
  13. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    When I was younger I had no trouble pointing my index finger of my forend hand toward the target and keeping left elbow rather high. At age 68 I have a lot of difficulty twisting my left wrist enough to do that, and now I end up with all four fingers on the far (right) side of the forend while my left elbow is down lower and the arm is at 45 degrees instead of parallel to the ground.
     
  14. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    FWIW.....I hold the gun with my Right elbow almost (but not quite) level horizontally. LEFT elbow is about 90* to the right, IOW.....almost (but not quite) vertical. If I drop my right elbow too much-----I b'lieve it makes me more prone to "arm shoot", a habit that often leads to "LOST".

    I usually hold the fore-arm pretty far out, depending on the length of the fore-arm? I don't grip it very hard, just sort'a rest it in the cup of my hand.

    John C. Saubak
     
  15. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    Oh, and........I agree with those who say you shouldn't move the gun with your arms. Once you've got the gun mounted, everything above the waist should move as a solid unit, including the gun. All flexibility should be in the waist, hips, and legs. Easier said than done when you're carrying an extra 75 lbs around the waist!

    John C. Saubak
     
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