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SMOLT?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by bridgetoofar, Mar 27, 2013.

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  1. bridgetoofar

    bridgetoofar TS Member

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    Does anyone still build Smolts? I have a 4" M19 and a 4" Python Bbl I would like to have converted. I know this was mildly popular before L Frames came out and then faded away. Just looking for an "experienced smith" to do the work.
     
  2. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    possibly Joe Leininger in Howell, Michigan

    He's a very good PPC revolver smith..

    Jim Chapman
     
  3. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Smolts (aka Smythons) were popular with a few folks at one time, but yeah, the L-frames made them a moot point. Most gunsmiths eyes glaze over if you ask them to do this conversion today.

    One issue with the Smython/Smolt - Most of these conversions lack the ejector rod support because a Colt barrel was used. This is key to accuracy with a S&W. Make sure the gunsmith machines the Colt barrel for the plunger, spring and cross pin. Otherwise you're better off getting an L frame.
     
  4. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    more than likely they all had the ball yoke locks installed...
     
  5. bossbasl

    bossbasl Active Member

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    The major reason to change a K frame Smith barrel for a Python barrel was for the change of twist rate to 1-14" to better stabilize wad cutters as well as to add weight. The L frame added the weight but the twist rate was not increased so wad cutter accuracy was not improved.
     
  6. Bob_K

    Bob_K Well-Known Member

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    My 5" Smolt was made on a 586 L Frame, and does have the ball crane locking up front.
     
  7. Sky Buster

    Sky Buster Sky Buster TS Supporters

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    In the mid 80's, when I was associated with the Louisiana State
    Police, the question of twist rates vs accuracy came up. We took
    a 6" Python with 1/14 twist and a 6" 586 with 1/18 3/4 twist.
    Both guns were shot at 50 yards using Federal 148 grain wad-cutters
    in a machine rest. Both guns kept all 10 shots inside the X ring
    of a B27 PPC target. Very little to no difference in group size.
     
  8. bridgetoofar

    bridgetoofar TS Member

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    Thanks for the info on the PPC builder and thanks for all the feedback. I'm going to have this done, but for no practical reason. Just like the weight, the looks of the Python Bbl and the action on a Smith. Besides, I simply always wanted one.

    When I was a cop I shot some PPC and shot a lot of police bullseye revolver league stuff, which was popular in NJ at the time. I fussed with different guns and tested Colts and Smiths for accuracy, finding no real difference with wadcutters. Swaged bullets shot marginally better than cast bullets, but of course they leaded the gun up much faster and cost was a lot more. Mostly shot a Model 14 SA with a Bomar Rib and Herret stocks. 2.7gr Bulleseye, WW Primers, any case, 3 group tighteners and I was ready to go. Good memories.
     
  9. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    <i>"...more than likely they all had the ball yoke locks installed..."</i>

    But that's not the issue. The hole in the crane for the ejector rod is often a bit oversize. It should not be relied on for proper alignment of the cylinder to barrel. The detent under the barrel and the hole in the recoil shield align the cylinder.
     
  10. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    Brian, I'm not sure what your saying??

    the ball yoke lock is the ball detent on the yoke that engages the depression on the frame to lock the yoke in place.

    almost 100% of the PPC guns made had either the ball detent, or the underlug spring loaded detent.

    I'm missing the significance of the ejector rod for alignment??
     
  11. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Well, then you're missing an important accuracy issue.

    Open up a S&W cylinder, grasp the crane (properly called the yoke), and then grasp the ejector rod. Wiggle the rod. If there is movement, that means the cylinder may not be aligned completely when firing. This invites creating imperfections on the surface of the bullet. Given the accuracy being sought, enough to warrant replacement barrels, then this accuracy issue needs to be looked at too.

    Look closely at the design of the S&W elector rod from the rear of the cylinder to the point where it meets the detent in the barrel. It is supported and aligned at both ends. The hole in the crane is there to retain it, but does not affect accuracy since the assembly is supported at the opposite ends of the rod.

    On a Colt, the cylinder is supported at the rear and by the crane. There is no barrel detent to hold and align the rod. This is done via the crane. Colts generally have a tighter crane clearance than a S&W for this reason.

    So when you swap a Colt barrel onto a S&W frame, you lose the barrel detent and wind up depending on the rod being supported at the rear of the cylinder and by the crane. Which on a S&W may or may not be a tight fit.

    The most careful gunsmiths will either machine the Colt barrel and add this ejector detent, spring and crosspin, or they will check for run out of the rod in the crane. If this detent is installed in the barrel, there is no need to install a detent ball in the crane. My assertion is if a detent has to be added, it's best to do what S&W originally did.

    (Note that while the cylinder itself rides on two surfaces on the crane/yoke, these also have to be tight as well. The rod is a more positive way to ensure alignment. The amount of run out difference is very small, but it can be measured.)

    And I'm away some gunsmiths say that the ejector rod detent vs detent ball in the crane makes no difference. Well they're right IF everything else is up to snuff. It's a matter of adding one little bit of tolerance to another little bit of tolerance and eventually it all adds up.
     
  12. sliverbulletexpress

    sliverbulletexpress TS Member

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    Sorry Brian but you are wrong about this.

    The ejector rod plays no part in the accuracy of a Smith revolver. Smith revolvers have the spring loaded plunger bearing against the ejector rod to help keep the cylinder closed and that's it. The cylinder is held in alignment by its fit to the crane, the cylinder rotates on the crane not the ejector rod. The hole the ejector rod passes thru the crane is larger than the rod because it's for clearance only.

    PPC gunsmiths put ball crane locks on in place of the ejector rod plunger to take that little bit of extra drag off the cylinder, the ball crane lock holds the cylinder closed just fine. If it added even a minute amount of accuracy you would see the spring loaded pin bearing against the ejector rod on all of them.
     
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