1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Smoked Pork Shoulder.....

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Brian in Oregon, Nov 26, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    Eight pound smoked pork shoulder - gone in four minutes...

    That's how long it took the platter to make one circuit of the long banquet table, for 18 people. I asked my sister-in-law if she had enough turkey and if I could bring a smoked pork shoulder. She said yes, by all means, a 20 lb bird was not enough.

    The local private meat market we use was almost out of them. Boneless at $2.49 a lb. They had a six pounder in the case, last one. I asked if they could make one up. They had enough to make one eight pounder.

    Rinsed and dried it, and put it in the cold smoker (Big Chief). Smoked it with cherry wood for five hours yesterday. Because this is a cold smoker, it does not cook the meat.

    Then put it in my own pork brine. I use a commercial brine, but instead of water, I use a mixture of apple cider (about 3/4 gallon) and a 1/3 to a 1/2 quart of apple cider vinegar. Add to this a very generous amount of powdered onion and powdered garlic seasoning. This is all done in a bowl large enough to cover the pork shoulder.

    I then take a turkey injector and sucked up the brine and powdered onion/garlic mixture, and injected it all through the pork. Then it sits overnight in the fridge.

    Don't worry about the smoke flavoring being diluted or washing away. It won't. I reversed the order because it's pretty sloppy trying to smoke a brine injected pork shoulder.

    This morning took the pork shoulder, dried it, and covered it with a pork rub.

    At this point there are two ways to cook it. Both are done in the oven.

    Wrap it in multiple layers of tinfoil. Get the super wide tinfoil because you don't want to be trying to make a double width with the narrow stuff. You'll have a seam that can and will leak. Add a cup of the brine before sealing. Tinfoil is thin, so set the wrapped shoulder on an oven pan.

    The better way is to just put it into an oven proof pot. A dutch oven works perfect. Add a cup or so of the brine, depending on how large the dutch oven is.

    Time and temp will depend on your time constraints. The meat must get to 180 degrees minimum in the center for at least an hour and a half. 200 degrees is better. This means setting the oven to about 450 degrees, and for an eight pound shoulder, this will take about five hours. At 475 time can be shaved to 4 to 4-1/2 hours. About half way through the cooking turn the pork over. I like to start with the fatty part on the top, then when flipped the meaty part will get a nice crust. When this flip takes place ladle some of the brine and juices onto the meat.

    That's it. If you follow the above, you'll have a nice, tender, flavorful smoked pork shoulder that is almost impossible to screw up. It will have a hard crust that's not too hard, and a juicy tender inside.

    I think the dutch oven is the way to go. It takes longer to get heated up (you can always preheat it in the oven while you are drying and putting the rub on). But it won't leak like aluminum foil can. It also allows checking (and basting), and it's roomy enough to add veggies or apples for flavoring.

    This is getting to be a tradition. And when pork shoulder is on sale, this makes excellent pulled pork sandwiches. And you do not need BBQ sauce. The pork has enough flavor on its own.
     
  2. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    4,477
    That sounds great Brian. The leftovers would be good to dice up in a batch of scalloped potatoes in that dutch oven. That's what I did yesterday with leftover ham.

    Sounds like yours was so good there were no leftovers!
     
  3. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,521
    Location:
    Idaho
    I love the recipe and have done almost the same but with dressing
     
  4. Hal1225

    Hal1225 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Messages:
    442
    Nice instructions, but I'll never cook one. I can smell and taste it all the way from Ct. Nice job!

    Harry Lyga
     
  5. Big Heap

    Big Heap TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,748
    Sounds delicious!

    Reminded of the old story about the fellow who took a Jewish friend to a BBQ restaurant and his guest spotted the pork special.

    The guest asked the waiter if they had whale on the menu.

    Waiter said "no whale".

    Guest said "bring me the BBQ pork, the Lord knows I asked for fish".
     
  6. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    What an excellent suggestion, Rick.
     
  7. ric3677

    ric3677 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,509
    Location:
    Montana
    Personally I prefer the "Egg"


    ric3677_2008_030316.jpg


    But that's just me......I am sure that Brian's was just as good. Hard to ruin a Boston Butt

    Rick in MT
     
  8. tedingraham

    tedingraham Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Messages:
    66
    My butts on a Traeger pellet smoker.



    tedingraham_2009_22123.jpg
     
  9. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    A hot smoker is really the way to go.

    But for budgets or beginners, cold smoking is cheaper and more controllable finishing in the oven.
     
  10. The Rock

    The Rock Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,491
    Try this next time plenty to go around. Two+ gallons of injected goodness and a dry rub. Once a year we have pig like this.

    Rock

    Jim
     
  11. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    4,477
    Rock, that looks like a seen from CSI. [:
     
  12. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    14,686
    Location:
    NW Wisconsin
    Great thread.

    Back in the 80s I fished Lake Michigan for salmon and smoked many of them. So much that I got tired of the fish. But I like this idea. I wonder if my ticker can handle all this rich food... Prob not. I'll ask my doc
     
  13. LUGNUTZ426

    LUGNUTZ426 TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Messages:
    855
    ROCK

    please dont take offense to this


    that pig looks great....but the torso shape brings "texas chain saw massacre" to mind!

    joe
     
  14. andybull

    andybull Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    885
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Brian I agree with you. We had 14 people over for Thanksgiving. I hired a Chef who cooked our pig and turkey in a Chinese box. This is what most Cubans use nowadays, soak it in Mojo sauce, salt and pepper, let it sit overnight and off into the box.




    andybull_2008_250926.jpg



    andybull_2008_250927.jpg



    andybull_2008_250928.jpg
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.