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smelting lead weights?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by grunt, May 7, 2007.

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  1. grunt

    grunt TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Bees wax brings the impurities top the surface so you can skim it off.
     
  2. 333t

    333t Member

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    I used to use a little wax for flux when I first started making shot but never could see that it did any good and so I stopped. The wax would just melt on the surface, smoke, and sometimes burst into flame. It didn't cause any more dirt or impurities to appear. I could tell no difference in my shot using flux or not using flux. I think it is completely unnecessary.

    I did find though that scraping the inside bottom and sides of the lead pot with your spoon brings a lot of crud to the surface of the molten lead. I do this periodically and it helps make purer ingots.

    Phil
     
  3. tom-n8ies

    tom-n8ies Member

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    Cut from an e-mail that was forewarded to me between two wise guys (really wise)

    (Stirring while fluxing is important)

    tom

    <snip>

    The fluxing is an interesting operation. The more flux you add the better it works up to a point. Some times you have to ignite the fumes coming off with a match. Saves filling you work space with nasty stuff (ie smelly smoke).

    Chuck, I believe the flux produces a reducing atmosphere over the melted material. This reduces the transition oxides which hold the oxides in the liquid and effectively makes the oxides distinct. Since the oxides are a lower density than the melt, they float to the surface where they can be skimmed off. It is important to stir the liquid metal during fluxing so that the flux gets to contact particles in the interior of the melt. Just after melting, it is a good idea to flux the metal a couple of times. Use a piece of flux about the size of a small walnut. If the pot is at the correct temperature, the flux will not self ignite. The flux also will reduce some of the alloying agents like tin that is on the surface of the metal liquid. Thus it is important to flux about every 15 minutes when you are casting. A bottom pour furnace is a big help.
     
  4. tom-n8ies

    tom-n8ies Member

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    Cut from an e-mail that was forewarded to me between two wise guys (really wise)

    (Stirring while fluxing is important)

    tom

    <snip>

    The fluxing is an interesting operation. The more flux you add the better it works up to a point. Some times you have to ignite the fumes coming off with a match. Saves filling you work space with nasty stuff (ie smelly smoke).

    Chuck, I believe the flux produces a reducing atmosphere over the melted material. This reduces the transition oxides which hold the oxides in the liquid and effectively makes the oxides distinct. Since the oxides are a lower density than the melt, they float to the surface where they can be skimmed off. It is important to stir the liquid metal during fluxing so that the flux gets to contact particles in the interior of the melt. Just after melting, it is a good idea to flux the metal a couple of times. Use a piece of flux about the size of a small walnut. If the pot is at the correct temperature, the flux will not self ignite. The flux also will reduce some of the alloying agents like tin that is on the surface of the metal liquid. Thus it is important to flux about every 15 minutes when you are casting. A bottom pour furnace is a big help.
     
  5. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    Sounds like you're beginning bullet casting maclellan 1911?

    Assuming you'r using reasonably clean alloy; first melt the alloy completely-->then put in a dab of flux (I just use a little bit of bullet lube but beeswax is the standard) and stir it in. Not real vigorously but deeply. This will help separate the impurities (mostly dirt) from the molten alloy and they'll rise to the top as "dross" where you simply skim it off.

    Then------>start molding bullets.

    John C. Saubak
     
  6. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    If you're into "Yahoo! Groups", recommend you check in to -> CB-L <-(Cast Bullet List). Bill Ferguson, the "antimonyman" used to post there quite a bit. Just checked in over there and he hasn't posted for awhile? No matter, there's a bunch of other fella's there with years of bullet casting knowledge.

    John C. Saubak
     
  7. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    put up some info on fluxing under shot makers shot and bullet lead is harder than plain lead dont use it in a muzzle loader rick
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I have fluxed with beeswax, paraffin and sawdust. Sawdust is used by the large smelters. I melted the lead in a larger propane fueled "turkey cooker" and then transfered the molten lead into a bottom draining electric lead melter. Scraping the bottom and sides of the electric furnace frequently is important.

    Pat Ireland
     
  9. ronbo142

    ronbo142 TS Member

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    Would Borax work as a way to remove impurities from lead?

    Ronbo
     
  10. alfermann66

    alfermann66 Member

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    Ronbo, I've heard that Borax will work. I use bees wax myself, but sawdust is good, too, especially pine, don't however, use sawdust from treated lumber as the fumes are toxic.

    Buz
     
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