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Slowing a release trigger

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by lefthdr, Sep 2, 2011.

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  1. lefthdr

    lefthdr Member

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    I was just at the local gun guy and a man came in to pick up his shotgun that just had the release trigger slowed down. I've never shot one, but why would you slow one down.
     
  2. trapshootin hippie

    trapshootin hippie Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it was so fast that it went off before he even pulled it.
     
  3. Doug Mc

    Doug Mc TS Member

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    Fast triggers are very sensitive ... you have to maintain a death grip on them to keep them from firing prematurely as you move to the target ... they are like a hair trigger in reverse ... been there myself ... oh how I wish I could shoot a pull trigger ... lots of people on here love release triggers ... I will say I hate them
     
  4. plaw

    plaw Active Member

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    I don't like them either, but they have kept me in the game for the last 20 yrs. It also makes trading guns harder..
     
  5. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    It's called "creep." Most guys want some creep in a release, so a death grip is not required.
     
  6. SMOKEIT

    SMOKEIT Well-Known Member

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    ......If the "Set" pressure is too close to the "Release" pressure the trigger will be "Fast" or maybe too fast. To slow it down the Smith would change the spring pressures or the angle of the sear catch...Smokit
     
  7. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    All of the above is fairly good information, however, that being said, here is the "Real" reason. Slowing down a release trigger allows the shooter the time necessary to get to the target before the gun fires. A release trigger that is too fast will result in "premature firing". That is, letting go of the trigger before you get to the target causing you to shoot behind the target. This is especially true on the angle birds. With a release trigger, it is all too easy to release the trigger before you aquire the proper sight picture, and well before the barrel reaches the target and a loss occurs.... Just my experience... Dan Thome... (Trap2)
     
  8. SMOKEIT

    SMOKEIT Well-Known Member

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    DAN, I am sure what you say is true for a lot of shooters but I know some pretty good shots that shoot a release so fast that I cannot shoot it at all...SMOKIT
     
  9. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    Smokit...... That is true, some shooter can, and do. What I am saying is that if a shooter wants a slower release, it's probably because they cannot shoot the one they have that is faster than they can handle. Does that make more sense to you? Dan
     
  10. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    I think there's no good or bad, it's a matter of preference. If you're a spot shooter you might want a very fast release. A shooter who tracks the target
    and maybe uses a maintained lead or pull away might want a slower trigger so that the gun has time to get ahead of the target.

    For me personally, if I had a fast release the only targets I'd hit would be ones that somehow made a quick U turn before I fired.
     
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