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SIG P226 experiences?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by EdSy, Sep 20, 2013.

  1. EdSy

    EdSy Active Member

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    The SIG 226 in 9mm is excellent plus. If it fits your hand well, you can shoot it very accurately. It breaks down easily for cleaning, and routine maintenance is easy. No negatives at all. -Ed
     
  2. Sky Buster

    Sky Buster Sky Buster TS Supporters

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    I have a P226. Very reliable and accurate. I don't like the
    high center-of-bore. The modern striker fired guns like the
    M&P and Glock sit much lower in the hand which results in
    less muzzle rise.
     
  3. Steve W

    Steve W Well-Known Member

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    One of the best DA service pistols in history. It's little brother P228 is the U.S. service pistol M11.

    Over the years, four 226s I owned, almost all factory ammo worked well, didn't like some range reloads. No problem except one did this to me:
    [​IMG]
    Sig say there's no fix, buy a new frame (at the cost of 80% of a new gun's street price).

    I gave it to a left handed friend so he can switch the catch to the other side.
     
  4. eff10mm

    eff10mm Member

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    Feb 10, 2012
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    I like mine. Has the new SRT trigger that is a big improvement. You can get 20 round mags for them in 9mm. I just don't like the slide stop location. I keep my thumb on top of it because of all my 1911 experience. This prevents the slide from locking back after the last round.
     
  5. 548

    548 Guest

    The Navy SEALS use the P226. And the SEALS do not use low bid equipment.

    I carried a P226 9mm for a number of years as a Deputy Sheriff. I now use a P229 for an off-duty weapon. My department, like so many others issues low-bid Glocks.
     
  6. edbon9

    edbon9 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    78
    i've had a few of them sigs (228's/226), the trigger is ok, but they are
    easy to work on, and easy to do a semi decent trigger job on them :)
    going from da/sa takes a little bit of time to get used to, unless you've
    shot revolvers extensively. lots of aftermarket parts, is a plus. get one
    with the night sights on. haven't broken anything, the mainspring will need
    replacement if you shoot hotter loads a LOT.
     
  7. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    I had a P-226 many years ago. At that time it was only available in 9mm. Replaced it with a P-220 in .45 ACP. I have long lamented getting rid of the P-226, but I was just married and we were on a budget trying to buy a house.

    Excellent gun all the way around. Reliability was excellent. Accuracy was very good. Ergonomics for me was very good, though the narrower P220 fit slightly better. The Beretta 92 is just a bit too fat for me, so the P226 is as fat as I want to go in a double stack.

    There have been changes to the P-226 over the years. My gun was an early one. All of the West German made guns used a state of the art (aircraft industry technology) stamped or "folded" slide, which was then milled. The front portion (the "barrel bushing") is electron beam welded in. Most people do not realize it is welded. The firing pin assembly is pinning in place with a doubled roll pin.

    Newer slides are milled from a solid block. They are heavier. This was done when the P-226 was offered in .40 and .357 SIG, as they needed more slide mass to function. These slides are made in the USA. Unlike the early slides, these are also offered in stainless steel. The newer slides do not use a roll pin for the firing pin assembly, because it is all machined integral. The newer slides have a more durable finish than the early slides. My P-220 has most of the finish gone from the slide, though the frame looks brand new.

    Which slide is better? For .40 and .357, you have no choice. For 9mm, the later, heavier slide might be a better idea if you are going to shoot hot ammo. The earlier slide weighs less (nice for carry) but some of the very early guns are said to have a frame cracking issue. This was only an issue if the recoil spring got weak, which required more ammo than many can afford to buy, and was more common with hot ammo. With replacement springs these guns have gone well past 100,000 rounds. Personally I prefer the early West German slide.

    There have been changes to the frame over the years. The only change that some people avoid is the "mud cuts" on very early frames. This puts less area in contact with the slide. If you're going to shoot 100,000 rounds maybe that makes a difference. Mine had the mud cuts and it did not bother me. Whether they are good feature for harsh conditions is debatable. I also prefer the early grips. I do not know if early and late grips are interchangeable. I've heard it reported both ways.

    If I was to purchase a later P-226, I would definitely want a switch barrel model for both .40 and .357 SIG. It increases the usefulness of the gun, especially in these times of scarce ammo supply.

    If I wanted a P-226 in 9mm, personally I'd go with an early model, as I would not be feeding it +P ammo and I'd want to shave a little weight for carry. If I were to use hot ammo, I'd look at a later model. But frankly, if I need more power, I'd rather use my P-220 in .45 ACP.

    Speaking of 9mm, for compact carry, especially in those states that do not allow more than 10 rounds, take a look at the P-225, which was also known as the P-6 in Germany. It's a single stack, with a shorter slide. Excellent carry gun. They were sold here as the P-225, but a lot of surplus P-6s have shown up here too. If I come across a nice example before an early P-226 shows up on my radar, I might not even bother with the P-226.
     
  8. Steve W

    Steve W Well-Known Member

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    Brian, you mean something like this? :)

    Original P6
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Yup, and that's sweet, Steve.
     
  10. ccw1911

    ccw1911 Member

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    I had a lot of experience with P226's working at MISS with SEALS and other special units in the mid 80's. The original welded up sheet metal slide guns had problems with the frames cracking, my personal gun cracked, my bosses gun cracked, and lots of students frames cracked. Sig replaced the frame on all of them quickly and changed the design ending that problem. These pistols were being used hard and the TZZ ammo issued at the time is pretty hot but since it was designed for military and police use the frame issue had to be fixed. Personally I didn't care for the breach block being held in by a roll pin on the welded slides and believe the solid slide is an improvement even with the slight extra weight.

    The newer pistols have rails to mount lights and lasers and the slides are solid steel, I haven't seen or heard of breakage problems with them. Unless you are nostalgic for the look of the original pistol IMO you are better off with the newer version.

    Edit to add I wholeheartedly recommend the Sig P226, it is a great pistol and I really like the decocker feature.
     
  11. Chichay

    Chichay TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I have several SIGs (210-6, 226, 228, and 229S) and would recommend ANY of them for reliability & accuracy. If your choice of caliber is 9mm, you can't go wrong with a 210. Second choice is a 228. Even considering Sig quality, the difference between the two is night and day, not to mention single stack (210) vs double stack (228). If you prefer .40S&W or .357Sig, then my suggestion is for the 226 or 229S. The 226 is too big a pistol for the 9mm (my opinion). Sig conversion kits (to .22LR) are readily available for the 226, 228 and 229S. I shoot .357Sig Speer Gold Dots (#54234) out of my 226. It still has to hiccup. Very controllable, accurate and reliable. My LE friends tell me it's an ideal combination. If you want even more controllability in .357Sig or .40S&W, the 229S fits the bill. The difference between a 229S and a regular 229 is that the S model has a longer barrel tipped with a compensator, while the 229 does not. The 229 sits between the 226 and the 228 in size.
     
  12. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    John, I had a custom made P226 in 9mm. It was the nicest pistol I've owned. The only complaints I had were the slide stop location and the high centerline of the bore. It makes for slower recovery for that fast second shot.

    Unfortunately, I did/could not shoot it well so I sold it. I'm happier with 1911s.

    BTW, make sure you tell Sig what you are planning to do. The inside dimensions for 9mm and .40/.357 are not the same, so you can only exchange barrels one way. If memory serves, you have to start with a 40/357 gun and then add the 9mm barrel. If you go the other way, you'll have to get the custom barrel from Gray Guns.

    Go to an indoor range and rent one. If you shoot it well, you'd be hard pressed to find a finer gun.
     
  13. jbmi

    jbmi Well-Known Member

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    I have a 226 in 40 S&W, like it much better than my 1911. 12 shot mag, night sights, and Crimson Trace grips. For my big hands it fit's like a glove . Mines old enough that the frame was made in Germany, and it has a ss slide.
    I'm a lefty and the fact that it does not have a safety works well.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. cpd544

    cpd544 Member

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    I carried a 226 for years as a duty gun and still own the one I carried. It has the 2 piece slide and is one of the best pistols I have ever owned. I have been to Sig armorer school and they are not the easiest to take apart or put back together but they are very well made and will last forever. I have yet to find any type of ammo it will not feed and shoot.
    Jim
     
  15. Bueno

    Bueno Member

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    MY SIG SAUER Equinox .40 caliber with 24K gold accents:


    [​IMG]
     
  16. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Bueno,

    Did you get the "grill work" done to match?
     
  17. twin

    twin Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    181
    hello

    I would like to find out if the early SIG P6, 225 is able to handle self defense loads (Hydra-Shok, Critical defense, etc.) without feeding problems. I read where this was a problem in the 1970'ies manufactured P6 SIG's. Can anyone speak to this.
    Any information provided would be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you.
     
  18. SMITH47

    SMITH47 Member

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    gun digest sig-sauer by massad ayoob talks about high velocity ammo such as cor-bon 115 gr jhp @ 1300 fps would occasionally fail to pick a round. but not a problem with standard pressure. i have a 225 and never had a problem. i like the size.
     
  19. Bueno

    Bueno Member

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    grntitan

    Damn right!
    Bling is in!
     
  20. eightbore

    eightbore Well-Known Member

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    Now that the little P225 is out of the Sig catalog, will it become a bit of a cult gun? I bought mine because of the feel of the grip, which was a lot more comfortable than the double column grips.
     
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