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Shotmaking question

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Shooting Jack, Oct 27, 2007.

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  1. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    Blackshear, Georgia
    I have been melting down wheel weights and pouring it into muffin pans. Recently I read where others were using beeswax in their lead. I have not been and have several hundred pounds ready for shotmaking. Am I going to have problems since I didn't use the beeswax. How much should I use in the future? I have been skimming the top of the molten lead as best I could before pouring it up. Thanks for your response. Jackie B.
     
  2. FN in MT

    FN in MT TS Member

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    Oct 25, 2007
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    The beeswax is used as a FLUX. Fluxing brings impurities to the surface as well as MIXING the various metals together. Beeswax, oil, parafin, even fine DRY sawdust can be used as a flux. You add a bit of flux, it will immediately smoke up, hit that smoke with a lighted match and STIR. The match ignites the smoke fumes , keeping the smoke down in your casting area.

    There are also commercially available smokeless fluxes, like MARVEFLUX.

    I'd try the alloy You have available and see how the shot drops/flows. IF You feel it's not flowing as well as it could, then flux it. In the future flux your alloy as your turning it into ingots.

    FN in MT
     
  3. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    FN, Thanks for your response. It's not going to poof up when I strike the match is it? I've already had a minor heart attack when dropping a moist wheel weight into the pot. Fortunately I had a hat, long sleeve shirt, welding gloves, long pants and boots on. It was like an explosion and I was blessed to only have a few minor burns. I will certainly try to never do this again. Jackie B.
     
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