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SHOTGUN STOCK LOP QUESTIONS?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by senior smoke, Dec 26, 2007.

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  1. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    hELLO:
    in 1970 an old time shooter told me, try to use the shortest stock possible without having your thumb hit your nose. his theory was that you want to get as close to the receiver as possible without hitting nose by your thumb. over the years i have used a 14 inch stock, a 14 1/4, and a 14 3/8 inch stock. i have found that different type guns feel more comfortable using different length stocks. when i shoot a 870 for trap my lop is 14 1/4, when i use a brake open single shot like a bt99, i like a 14 3/8 stock. over and under i like a 14" stock. do you shooters use the same lop on all your guns? or do you change lop depending on the type,& make and manufacturer? why do some guns feel better at differnt lops? does this make any sense?
    steve balistreri
     
  2. mixer

    mixer Well-Known Member

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    Have had the same LOP (14.50") on my Browning Broadway o/u for the past 35 years. Tried other LOP's by adding spacers for a while but always returned to the 14.50". I guess I'm kind of a luddite in that I like to keep things simple, non-adjustable stock, non-adjustable rib and fixed chokes.


    Eric
     
  3. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Remember that LOP is measured from the trigger to the butt and since the trigger placement on two different guns will differ, so will their measured LOP even though your thumb-to-nose clearance might be the same on both. I'd rather we use the pistol grip to butt measurement as a standard but that's hard to do.

    I, too, use the thumb-to-nose theory as a starting point and have found that I'd rather have a stock be a little too short than a little too long.

    Ed
     
  4. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    The shape of the pistol grip determines how much LOP I use for trap guns. I needed 15" on my Broadway just so my wrist didn't get sore trying to bend that much. The more vertical the grip, the less LOP I need for comfort.
     
  5. energy

    energy TS Member

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    I found the same 'rule of thumb' theory (sorry) in an old obscure book about skeet. I asked many shooters and no one would give me any idea about how to judge the stock length question. I watched guys at the range and there were as many techniques as contestants. I also noticed everyone has a different placement for the stock against there shoulder. This could have to do with your own personal stock dimensions. My understanding is to keep the stock right next to your collar bone, so your head and eyes are more easily placed over the stock. This allows you to keep your head straight and eyes parallel to the ground and in turn, gives you better depth perception. I went the empirical route. I cut many different lengths on several guns over the years and noticed I could move one gun more comfortably than the other, and stuck with that length as a place to start fitting all other guns. This has worked best for me. A doctor friend of mine also told me that 40% of men have what is called 'short arm syndrome'. Your upper is shorter than the length of the distance from shoulder to the top of your hip. Something to consider while fitting. I also found, if I keep my trigger arm at roughly 45 degrees and not the 90 degree angle some recommend, my 'hold' is more comfortable and I can move easier. It's easier to put a relaxed muscle into motion than it is tense one. Just some ideas.
    Bob
     
  6. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Length of pull is directly proportional to the temperature at the shooting range. HMB
     
  7. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    every stock and gun is different

    on a stock there are a lot of measurements- - comb thickness- grip thickness, comb orientation, grip orientation and distance-- butt proportions-- etc etc etc

    LOP I think is the least critical of all the measurements and there is a tolerance - most people that tolerance is about 3/4 of an inch to an inch on the SAME stock

    depends- the shorter your neck and or the fatter your face (doesnt matter if you are 6'8 and 310 -- the less variance you will have- also a lot of those bigger guys need a shorter LOP but they wont admit it

    You know it when someone fits you--- and those fitting measurements are only good for that stock(or one identical in all manners of shape and size)

    regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  8. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    Senior...

    The nose to thumb distance is a good rule of thumb but several things affect that distance. Among them are the stance that is used, the height of the gun mount, the pitch and drop at the heel dimensions as well as the shape of the grip, as was mentioned. It is the shape of the grip that not only affects the position of the trigger-hand but directly bears on the comfort of the trigger hand. The LOP can also affect the balance of guns with the type or style of a gun also having an effect.


    To address only one variable, the nose/thumb separation, trap shooters usually want a stock slightly longer than those shooting other disciplines because of trap's reduced swing latitudes and the greater importance of swing smoothness in trap shooting.

    With the head and neck correctly upright and the pitch on the stock correct to limit the rearward movement of the gun during recoil, the nose/thumb separation can be less than the 1" - 1 1/2" rule-of-thumb without the danger of an unexpected impact to the nose by the thumb during recoil (with little benefit, however).

    Swing speed is not as important in trap shooting as it is in skeet or sporting clays so a shorter stock that promotes increased swing speed is of little or no value.

    I realize my answer is of no great value but LOP is a complex dimension to discuss due to its being affected by other things involving stock dimensions and shooting form.

    Rollin
     
  9. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    Senior Smoke: Shooting a gun with the shortest LOP that is comfortable will give you the best scores, a stock that is too long will short shoot the angles, in other words you will shoot behind them. And you will shoot under the straightaways. I have done this for shooters many times, I take a score sheet and record the breaks, I can tell if the stock is too short or too long, after checking the EYE TO BEAD relationship, you get that correct sight picture first that the shooter shoots, then I score their breaks, H for targets breaking down,
    L for targets breaking up, B for targets breaking forward, C for targets centered, O for targets shot over, U for targets shot under. That way I can tell after tallying the breaks what is happening and advise what needs to be done for that shooter. I will say this that most shooters shoot a gun that shoots too low for them, They need a gun that will center targets, the best way for this is to have the trap set on straight aways, and from the 16 Yd line shoot 25 targets or more to make sure they are centering their targets.

    That is my personal approach, more things will come about after doing this, one would be target breaking point, you should shoot before the target starts going down, I prefer just before it peaks, angles and all but that is my shooting decision, windy days with targets going every which way is another chapter to deal with. I would say shoot consistently the same way and you will break most of the targets.

    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  10. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    It must just be me but i like a longer lop. More comfortable to shoot and less tiresome . I think it mihgt be the surgeries on my left shoulder that I'm a right handed shooter tha makes it more comfortable for me. I'm at 14.75 on my 1100 and it seems to work. I'm 5'9" not tall at all
     
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