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Shot vs Shot

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by maclellan1911, Nov 9, 2007.

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  1. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    True or false. have heard several times, 1 # 7 1/2 shot/pellet has the same breaking power as 5 #8???? Is it true? I have no 8s to weight and compare weight.
     
  2. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    False.

    Neil
     
  3. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    The comparison I've read is from Dick Bennett's book:

    <I>"A trap load of 2 3/4 drams of powder using 7 1/2 size shot develops as much energy at the target as a 3-dram load of 8s."</i>

    Morgan
     
  4. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    7 1/2 shot launched at 1150fps retains 1.37 ft/lb of energy at 30 yards, and 1.02 at 40 yards.

    For 8 shot launched at 1200fps, the respective figures are 1.17 and 0.85.

    For 8 launched at 1150fps, they are 1.11 and .081.

    Data is from Ed Lowry's Shotgun Ballistics for Windows. You decide.
     
  5. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    Federal used to have published data on this subject. Check their website, it may be contained therein.

    Curt
     
  6. lumper

    lumper TS Member

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    Ok ... overall can I get a definative answer as to which load would be a better overall all trap, skeet and overall shotgun sports load?

    1oz of #7.5's @ 1290fps or 1oz of #8's @ 1290fps?

    If you were to use only one load and one load only which would be the best for overall all around use?
     
  7. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    If it requires something like 0.1 ft/lbs for a single shot to pass through a target it would make no difference if the single shot contained 0.85 or 50 ft/lbs of energy. Both would transfer only 0.1 ft/lbs into the target. I recognize that there could be a slight difference in "shattering force" with shot at different energy levels. My point is that once you have enough force to do the job, any additional energy is wasted.

    Pat Ireland
     
  8. JBrooks

    JBrooks TS Member

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    The only problem Mike is that areas of shot density, which produces inkballs, move around the pattern and is seldom in the center. So, if you get one it is just as much luck as accuracy.
     
  9. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    1400fps Mike.

    To Pat's point, I have often heard (and read) it takes 0.5 ft/lb of retained energy to reliably break a thrown clay target. I have no idea how accurate that is, but experience tells me it's probably a little conservative. I arbitrarily use 0.6 ft/lb as my cut off. Why? I'm conservative and that's what I decided to use when I created my spreadsheet for flight times, required lead and retained energy.

    Anyway, for shot launched at my preferred 1150fps, 9 shot drops to 0.6 ft/lb at 33 yards. 8 1/2 shot at 42, 8 shot at 50.5 and 7 1/2 shot at 59.

    Again, all data is from Ed Lowry's SBW program.
     
  10. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    JBrooks, that is not completely true. It is true that density is not evenly distributed in the pattern, but in any load worth shooting there are enough pellets in the core to make smoke with a perfectly centered hit.
     
  11. code5coupe

    code5coupe Member

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    While it's true that the center/core of the pattern generally is dense, there are generally several more areas outside of the center that are similarly dense. Ergo, a smoke-balled target does not necessarily guarantee a centered target.
    Generally.
     
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