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Shot size verses outside temp verses choke size

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by maka, Apr 14, 2010.

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  1. maka

    maka Member

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    How many use different size shot and/or choke size in cold,(0-40) verses warm,(65-95) temps?
     
  2. BIGDON

    BIGDON Well-Known Member

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    You got to be kidding.

    Don
     
  3. mjsweims

    mjsweims Member

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    It's easy. Move to where it's always warm.
    Greetings from California
     
  4. maka

    maka Member

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    BIGDON: The reason I asked was because in the new Trap Magizine USA, this topic was covered. I was curious to see if anyone else on here eithier read it or actually did it.
     
  5. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    There's just another reason why I haven't bothered to pay any attention to that rag.

    ss
     
  6. birddogs46

    birddogs46 Active Member

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    same choke for caps in cold weather 7.5 shot, warm & humid usually 8's, i can still miss with either...dk
     
  7. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    maka, this game of trapshooting is not that complicated, far easier then having to bring home some meat for the table. With one gun, one choke, one type of shell, in all weather and temperature conditions, if your hungry enough, you will learn to hit your quarry. Fur, feather, or clay. Wayne
     
  8. Damifino

    Damifino Member

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    My Guess:
    Shot size may make a difference in that the clay is harder in cold temperature and you may have bb's punch through and not visibly break a target (weak hits). A larger diameter bb I think may be more likely to break pieces off.


    I don't think the choke is a dynamic factor in cold weather shooting because the heat from the powder burn, the friction of the wad on the barrel wall and also the residual heat of the barrel from previous shots will likely negate the lower ambient.


    I'd bet there is difference in shooting cold (0°) shells vs. warm (80°) ones. Leaving you shells in the trunk over night before a shoot in very cold weather might produce a shell/shot performance different than what you're used to.


    Don't have anything to support any of this - just what I would expect.
     
  9. BIGDON

    BIGDON Well-Known Member

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    maka; I shoot in the north during winter, south in the winter and all over in the summer and I don't change one thing other than I won't shoot certain brands of foreign junk shells in the winter. I don't know anyone that makes the changes you suggest. Don't trust that mag. to far. Remember = Look - See - Kill.

    Have fun.

    Don
     
  10. JH

    JH Well-Known Member

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    Beg to differ.....last weekend while shooting skrap from the 27 yard line at clays which had been kept in an unheated connex over the winter, my 8 shot factory loads would move the clays but seldom break them.....

    When it is really cold you need larger shot: 7 1/2 and tighter chokes....of course, most people don't have a clue about REAL COLD!
     
  11. BIGDON

    BIGDON Well-Known Member

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    Why would you use anything other than a full at 27 hot or cold?? How far below O does it have to be to really know about cold?? Do you really think 7 1/2's are that much better than 8's?? Personally I think you are just creating mental garbage which does affect your shooting.

    Don
     
  12. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Targets are made from pitch and limestone. The limestone is not affected by temperature. Pitch will become a little more brittle when cold. The brittle pitch should fracture easier than softer pitch.

    Don- You are certainly correct about the one brand of discount shells in cold temperatures. The velocity really drops at low temperatures. Even at warm temperatures, the velocity is less than printed on the box in the few I have tested.

    Pat Ireland
     
  13. jimsw

    jimsw Member

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    It is important to remember the brand of primer as well as shot size and choke:

    0-40 degrees Activ primers (hard to get but they make a huge difference)
    41-64 AA
    65-95 Remington
    Over 95 Federal

    For each 5 degree rise in temperature reduce your choke size .001 to .002.
     
  14. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    Bangalore ... I know about really cold ... grew up in Vermont near the Canadian border.

    I solved the problem by moving to Kommiefornia!
     
  15. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    It's far easier to recommend a max load of the heaviest shot allowed for most trap shooting in all conditions. The one size fits all may not be the best answer for all conditions and circumstances for everyone though.

    If I had to shoot 1-1/8th ounce loads all the time, I'd have to severely cut down on the small amount I shoot now! I use 1 ounce loads of #8s for most of my shooting and have had to for quite some time due to health problems. Why 8s? Because I get more 8s in my 1 ounce pattern than with a full 1-1/8th ounce of 7-1/2s! I've broken several 50 straights from the 25-27 shooting those puny loads.

    One size doesn't necessarily fit all "needs" in my opinion. When I miss a target in handicap, it's certainly not my ammo choices fault at all!!

    Hap
     
  16. JH

    JH Well-Known Member

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    Hi Ahab,

    Vermont near the Canadian border? You mean, way down South in the Banana Belt?
    Where you grew up in winter is similar to a warm spring up here....

    Pat,

    You may have shot a trillion clays down south; you may be factually correct in terms of describing the composition of clays....but you are simply WRONG!

    Clay targets which have been kept and shot in extremely cold temperatures are inherently HARDER TO BREAK....of course, the other poster was correct: primer/powder combinations should rely upon hot primers and FAST BURNING/FAST CURVE powders (tight crimps help a lot also!)

    When shooting in REAL COLD, you need tighter chokes, larger shot, hot primers and FAST/HOT powders....this is no theory, this is not reality, this is ACTUALITY! Then again, these are EXTREME CONDITIONS which 99% of shooters never experience!
     
  17. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Bangalore- In my limited tests striving to quantitatehow different brands of targets break, I did test targets that were held at 15 F for two days. I could not see a significant temperature difference.

    Rather than using a fast burning powder at lower temperatures, wouldn't it be better to use a powder that is resistant to changes due to temperature. Alliant tests their powders at 120 F, 60F and -20F. Some powders change a lot over this temperature spread, others change relatively little but all slow down at low temperatures. Just because a powder burns fast does not mean it is resistant to changes due to temperature. Also at low temperatures the air is denser and this can open up patterns and slow down shot.

    You are correct about my personal shooting in cold temperatures. I hibernate when it gets below 50 degrees. I have a Groundhog that I feed in my back yard. When she is not up and active, I don't shoot.

    Pat Ireland
     
  18. BIGDON

    BIGDON Well-Known Member

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    Analyze, figure, calculate and measure. Then some kid comes along and beats your ass with a 870 pump with a fixed choke.

    It also could be the brand of target you are shooting also.

    Don
     
  19. SWIFT

    SWIFT TS Member

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    Never checked shotgun powders but velocity and pressure drops on varmit rifles in winter esp when ammo exposed to cold temp. Same load in summer when hunting on dog towns will approch red line hard to open bolts & flat primers.
     
  20. otnot

    otnot Active Member

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    I live in Alaska. I shoot 1 oz #8's for everything when practicing. Our targets have been stored for 2 years in a Conex container and they turn to smoked if I do my part. The only difference I have found is that when it's really cold (below zero) your pattern opens up more and some powders and cheap shells sound a little light.
     
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