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Shot making-trouble shooting

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Ajax, May 3, 2007.

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  1. Ajax

    Ajax Well-Known Member

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    I've found there are many different procedures to make shot and non is the "right way". What works for you may not work for someone else.

    That being said, there are however some guidelines and in an effort to help some of the new people starting up shot makers. I dug out some of the old information I received with the first Littleton I purchased. It was good information and I've found it to be consistent.


    If the shot is shaped like a tear drop: The lead is not releasing from the lip. The lip is dirty or not coated well enough with soap stone.

    If the shot has flat spots: The lip is too far away from the cooling solution or the cooling solution is too thick.

    If the shot has dimples: The cooling solution is too thin.

    If the shot turns to "popcorn": There is too much water content in the cooling solution.

    Sometimes it does help to adjust the angle of the lip in relation to the cooling solution. Each shotmaker is a little different and the angles will vary.



    If anyone has trouble shooting or up-dated information. I'm sure the people starting to make shot would like to hear about it.

    Thanks,
    Ajax
     
  2. Ajax

    Ajax Well-Known Member

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  3. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    In shotmaking, Clean alloy is a must. Dirty alloy will cause a LOT of trouble
    in the shot maker. Time spent getting the alloy clean before you pour your ingots will pay dividends later when you don't have to deal with plugging drippers.





    Jim
     
  4. Ellen

    Ellen TS Member

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    This is some of the best advice I have heard lately. What took you so long?
    Ellen
     
  5. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    The lip area of the shot maker is fairly sensative to cool breezes. They will cool the lip and drippers causing slow downs and oddly shaped/size shot.

    Note: I noticed today that my local walmart has stocked prestone Low-Tox antifreeze. For those that may be inclined to try it.


    Ellen, I was holding out for a book deal, But gave up on that idea.


    Jim
     
  6. Ajax

    Ajax Well-Known Member

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    I was pouting because Stewart doesn't sell the ladles only!LOL.

    Another item: If you take a 1/16 welding rod, take the flux off it and bend it to the right angles. You can clean the nozzles on the fly. Working the welding rod back and forth, against the bottom of the inside of the nozzles, will bring out small pieces of scum that worked their way into the nozzles. It works most of the time but not all. If it doesn't work and you don't want to shut down for one nozzle. Build a tapered plug, bent to a 90 degree angle to stick into the nozzle opening.



    Ajax
     
  7. Ajax

    Ajax Well-Known Member

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    Are there any other tid-bits of information you have discovered when running your shotmaker? I'm sure anything would be of help to people starting to make shot.

    What may be a small item to you, may be giving someone else a terrible time.

    Ajax
     
  8. snarepeg

    snarepeg TS Member

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    MAKE A GROOVE IN YOUR CHALK/SOAPSTONE BEFORE RUNNING IT ALONG THE BOTTOM OF YOUR LIP, HELPS YOU NOT TO SLIP OFF INTO YOUR COOLANT.

    MY QUESTION? HAVE UPRATERD FROM 110 TO 220 VOLTS, DO I NEED A REOSTAT TO CONTROL MY HEAT?????. SNAREPEG
     
  9. goosecall

    goosecall TS Member

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    Here is my setup, Better Shot Maker, 5 gallons of sierra antifreeze with 1 pint of liquid laundry detergent. I am dropping into a 4 gallon bucket. When I first ran the machine it ran fine, then it began to slow down, and never got back on track, I have some very large shot and not very round. I notice some scum on my lead, and quit a bit. I am thinking my flux is doing to good a job and mixing the tin back into the lead when I make the ingots.
    My second batch turned out better, but the same thing happened and I kept getting slow downs on some of the dripers, and resulted in very large shot. I moved the coolant closer to the lip hoping this would make rounder shot: it did but still not round. Should I try putting some water into the coolant and thin it some, I am thinking I might have put too much laundry detergent in? 10Tenner
     
  10. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    Sounds like your putting cold ingots into the ladle. This will cool things down a bit and result in slow downs and larger shot. DO NOT add water to the anti-freeze.





    Jim
     
  11. goosecall

    goosecall TS Member

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    Jim, My ingots are setting on a metal rack above the shot maker,they are staying warm. I noticed some yellow film around the inside of my ladle. Do not know what this is? I was running in the 40's to 50's air temp. Is this to cold for the 220V Better Shot Maker? I also, notice a lot more film on the lead than the lead that came with the shot maker! Why not add water to the antifreeze? Please explain? 10Tenner
     
  12. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    The yellow film is most likly tin oxide. I get some of it too. Doesn't seem to cause much trouble. About the only way to get it out of the alloy is to flux with 100% sodium hydroxide and follow up with ground charcoal.

    40s and 50s Is probably a little on the cool side for the shotmaker. I like it to be at least in the 60s and still run a small heater in the shop. It's not difficult to cool the lip and drippers enough to completely stop them and have molten metal in the ladel.

    Water will change the heat transfer rate of the coolant. Stand a good chance of having the lead droplets pop open or have pin holes and hollow shot. Been there and done that already.

    The film on the lead is just lead oxide. You really can't stop it from forming. I skim it off occasionally. It's not really a problem as long as the alloy level stays above the dripper inlets.


    Jim
     
  13. powder-em

    powder-em Member

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    Tenner, I find that if I get that yellow film my lead is to hot. Tin burning off. I try to keep it going fast enough to avoid this. Good Luck in the learning curve. Dave
     
  14. goosecall

    goosecall TS Member

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    Thanks, Jim, and Dave! Jim I no nothing about sodium hydroxide. Were do I get it? Is there some precautions on its use? 10tenner
     
  15. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    It's the active ingredient in draino. It's a real pain to use. Gloves, glasses and a respirator is needed. It's also very hygroscopic.





    Jim
     
  16. scott k

    scott k TS Member

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    tenner. tap the bowl to keep the drip rate faster. if that doesn't help, use the cleaning tool. and your lead is too hot. too mutch lead in the bowl makes bigger shot. soft lead makes bigger shot. hope this helps.

    scott
     
  17. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    Tenner, Mash on the link. ck out pages 12 thru 15. Dave has a lot of info on cleaning alloy for shotmaking.



    Jim
     
  18. Ajax

    Ajax Well-Known Member

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    Sodium Hydroxide can be used, and I have, but in my opinion it's not worth the time or trouble. Bee's wax will do the job and is a lot safer. There is a lot elements in the lead we're using like Copper, Aluminum, Zinc, Antimony, Tin and some others. If you ever hit a batch of lead that has Babbitt in it, the nozzles will come to a screeching halt. Clean the lead for the ingots as good as possible. When clean, the molten lead should have the look of Mercury.

    Tenner, I agree with Jim, I believe you have to much heat fluctuation in the ladle. If your running with an outside temp of between 40 to 50 you need the ingots to be hot, not just warm. If you can pick them up with your hand, I would think they're not hot enough.

    Ajax
     
  19. goosecall

    goosecall TS Member

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    I talked to Jim Stewart this evening. He ran into the Babbitt alloyed wheel weight problem. He informed me that it is from the the big truck tire weights. Jim was given some truck tire weights from a county school bus shop, and ran into the lead sticking to the drippers, he was told by a friend who had use some weights from the same shop, that the truck tire weights have babbitt in them, and babbitt sticks to metal. Jim said to use Beeswax. I will have to remelt my ingots, and reflux with bullet lube or beeswax, some bullet lubes have some beeswax. Jim told me he had used his shot maker in his shed when it was in the 30's, and there should be no problem with the air temperature I was running at. 10tenner
     
  20. Ajax

    Ajax Well-Known Member

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    Just some information on the heat range I run. I have a industrial digital probe thermometer. Made for checking the wall temperature of chip cooking vessels and pipes. I checked the ingots on top of the deck, the next one to go into the ladle. It's 230 degrees. The pool of lead in the ladle is 680 degrees. The top of the lip between the last nozzle and the outer edge of the lip is 440 degrees. I have no idea how these temperatures compare with other set ups.

    Ajax
     
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