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shot lubrication

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by dhip, Jun 18, 2010.

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  1. dhip

    dhip Active Member

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    Juat wondering.I know they use graphite to more or less lube lead shot.I'm sure this has been done ever since they stared making shells and found that graphite was the best because it wouldn't effect any components adversly,especially in the early days of paper wads etc.


    Now that the wads are one piece and made of durable plastic,I was wondering what adverse effects if any would be caused by maybe spraying a chemical in your shot bottle to lube the shot.Let's say something like Rem oil,Gunzilla or another comparable lubricant/cleaner.Remember,I didn't say saturate,just light spray .

    Would this also keep build up down in barrel?

    Also,what effect possibly would it have on shot in flight?

    Doug H.
     
  2. KEYBEAR

    KEYBEAR Active Member

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    Some Times the best is still the best Graphite is cheap . I would never use oil .
     
  3. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    Ever hear of never oiling in the inside of gun and rifle magazines? Oil inside the chamber when it burns could produce unpredictable pressures. Same thing with lubing shot with anything besides graphite. I would not want to be around when you "light spray" a bunch of shot. I'm not trying to be a smart ass, only lube shot with graphite.

    Wayne
     
  4. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    After Katrina.. everyone gave me their flooded shotgun shells.. I saved the lead.. Almost a 55 gallon drum of it.. 5's..7.5's.. 8's.. 8.5's and 9's.. I washed and tumbled it in a cement mixer.. dried it.. then added graphite and a squirt of tri-flo.. Probably had 300/400 pounds per load.. It worked flawlessly.. and some shells I loaded 2 years ago.. still shoot perfectly..
     
  5. Ajax

    Ajax Well-Known Member

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    I picked this up from Mike. Some batches of my homemade shot does not shine as I would like, so while it's tumbling in graphite I squirt a little TriFlow in it. Works great. How did Winchester apply their Luably(sp) lubrication?

    I fail to see how this helps with deposits in the barrel? Most wads cover the shot.

    Ajax
     
  6. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Lubricating the shot with graphite helps it flow through tubes in both the manufacturing process and then it is used for reloading. Lubrication does little to protect the shot or the barrel when the shell is fired.

    Wayne- Your comment is the first time I have heard about burning oil in the chamber/barrel increasing pressure. Considering the burning rate of oil, I do not see how this could be possible. Many, perhaps most, barrels have a light coat of oil in them before the first shot is fired on the line.

    Pat Ireland
     
  7. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    Pat, maybe my statement is not correct, but I was told by a Sig armorer to never oil inside of magazines. He said oil on bullets will burn and create gases. When mixed with the gases of the gunpowder burning, pressures are unpredictable. Most gun, rifle and shotgun manuals tell you to run dry patches through your barrels to remove any oil before you shoot them. Most of us don't. It probably doesn't matter in a shotgun, but I wouldn't lube the shot. Wayne
     
  8. semperfi909

    semperfi909 Well-Known Member

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    The business of not oiling chambers stems from the lube hindering the case brass from grabbing the chamber wall and greatly increasing the blowback on the bolt face in metallic cartridge firearms. Chamber pressures are not changed just redistributed in the action. I have no idea if this has ever been examined for shotgun shells but one or more of the factories prolly did at one time or another. 10Kpsi shotgun pressures in a fixed breech or automatic may be way less critical than 60Kpsi in a rifle.
    I think I would avoid fluid lube in the shot tube because of the possible and likely migration along the charge bar and gunking up the powder bushing.

    Charlie
     
  9. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    Wayneo and Pat Ireland

    I would caution against lubricating "Metallic" cartridges. Main reason is the possibility of increased "Thrust" on the boltface. The cartridge brass would normally "grip" the chamber to some extent. Add some lube and you could increase the backward forces on the boltface or slide due to the loss of "Grip" on the chamber. How much extra force is the question, and if it would be significant enough to be unsafe. I remember reading these cautions over the years and might try to dig up the sources to see the exact details they covered.
     
  10. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    I had a .348 Winchester for many years. To facilitate feeding, the round had a fairly sttep body taper.

    If you loaded them strong, there was a lot of bolt thrust, and the common knowledge was to ream the chamber to Ackley improved form (much less taper) to lessen the bolt thrust.

    good point on oily pistol rounds.

    HM
     
  11. oz

    oz Active Member

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    oil would also soften the wad and hull
     
  12. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    <blockquote>"oil would also soften the wad and hull"</blockquote>

    Unless the oil contains some other solvents, the plastics used to make either aren't effected by it.

    MK
     
  13. dhip

    dhip Active Member

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    Thanks for replys.No I don't plan on doing it,but being new some questions just sort of Pop up.
    Got another one for you if interested?


    Found an old bottle of Moly Kote Z Powder by dow corning. Yep a lubricating powder reccomended for extreme temps,hot or cold.Planning on maybe using it on my choke tube threads depending on replys to other thread.But,if it's negative maybe I could use it in my shot mix.,,I better just go on vacation a while to my cabin in W.V.,too many thoughts running threw this ol' head.Just reload and shoot the stuff probably is best anyways,shouldn't try and make a good thing better I guess.

    Doug H.
     
  14. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Molykote is molybdenum disulphide, should be fine for your purposes. HMB
     
  15. IM390

    IM390 Member

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    Graphite has been used because it prevents the clumping in small columns of shot over long time periods. It is unaffected by weahter, for example. Outers Shotgun Cleaning Kits specifically warns to wipe out all oil and grease in a shotgun barrel before firing. And I've seen Tri-Flow melt the wheels off a pine wood derby car.
    So the next time you guys want to re-invent the wheel, the please allow me
    enough time to walk 30 feet away before you pull the trigger. As I said before, a guy came into the club last year with his Bt-99 in several pieces. He had some old shells to shoot up and they were so old he couldn't remember how he loaded them.
     
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