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Shorthair

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Sigraph, Dec 4, 2009.

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  1. Sigraph

    Sigraph TS Member

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    I have the opportunity to get back into bird hunting.
    A friend is trying to find a home for the last of 2 (he's taking one) German Shorthair pups - 6 weeks old, for $150. I think for this price I have to get her. I prefer females, because they seem to go right to hunting, and males have to smell everything first. I've never had a shorthair, but have never heard any negative comments. Any advise?
     
  2. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I love the GSPs. Very smart, energetic and loving. The only downsides are that they don't do well in extreme cold and they need lots of exercise/attention.

    I don't know the blood lines you are looking at so who knows what kind of dog you will get. Odds are it will be a great dog. Remember though, the initial purchase price is nothing compared to what you will spend on the dog over the years.
     
  3. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    The choice of breed depends on what kind of hunting you want to do. A word to the wise; the initial price of the dog pales into insignificance considering the cost of quality food and Vet bills and general maintenance etc..
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Well-Known Member

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    have had 2 GSPs good dogs, female was better, read the above posts very good advice.. Ross
     
  5. high 2

    high 2 Member

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    If the pup is out of any decent blood, $150 is a bargain. I`ve got a male and a female that were given to me 4 years ago. The MOST expensive gift yet. Worth every penny I`ve spent. They were sure happy that pheasant season opened Tueday. Killed my limit in about 30mins. Dogs pointed all three. Life is GOOD.
     
  6. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    Taking 6 wirehairs pheasant and quail hunting tomorrow. I don't need to take all six but all six want to go. I will rotate them 2 or 3 at a time. You can get good and bad in all hunting breeds. I tend to prefer females too but right now my only male usually finds the most birds on a hunt. Nothing more exciting than walking in on a dogs point and shooting birds. Especially if it is a dog you raised and trained. I am really looking forward to this weekend. Spent most of this season hunting ducks only going after quail on the opener. Sunday it is skeet and trap practice. In two weeks I am going on a pheasant/quail hunt with someone that has thousands of acres in Kansas. I love hunting season. Only problem is it is too short. Good luck with your new pup. Nothing cuter than a puppy.
     
  7. linkerman

    linkerman Member

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    Wonderful dogs!! I am on my third one in twenty years. As stated above they require a lot of attention and exercise. They are a great family dog and excellent around children. My current two year old female is a great quail/dove dog, family pet and has made several trips down to the local children’s hospital serving the role as a therapy dog. There only desire in life is to please their family!!
     
  8. andybull

    andybull Active Member

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    I've learned to buy a trained dog, everytime I sent a pup out for training I would be told by the trainer (after paying for 4 or more months of training that the pup wasn't going to be a good hunter).

    Andy
     
  9. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Wow Highflyer, six pointers! I'm envious. I'm down to one GSP now but he is a good one.

    I'm headed out on a 10 day road trip tomorrow with western KS as the destination. Very excited.
     
  10. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    I have raised several generations of dogs. I used to train them a lot. Not anymore. I think people do more harm than good by overtraining. They are born knowing most of what they need. With my youngest dog right now the only training I did was retrieving socks in the hallway to retrieving a few dummies in the yard. I got her used to a blank pistol while she was retrieving in the yard. Then I took her a couple of times out with pen raised birds where I shot a shotgun while she was in full pursuit. I never taught her whoa and never taught her how to back. Opening week this season she pointed several quail and held until I flushed them, she backed the older dogs and she retrieved several quail. If you buy from hunting lines the instincts are usually all there. Hunting brings them out. I think far more dogs are ruined by poor training than are born bad dogs.
     
  11. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    My goal is to get back down to 4 dogs of different ages. My problem is when I have a litter I can't stop myself from wanting one of them. I don't want any more litters until a couple of my older dogs get old and die. Right now my dogs are in their prime ranging from 2 to 8 and it sure is nice to be able to rotate fresh dogs with 2 or 3 on the ground all the time. I have two son-in-laws that are ate up with hunting now because of me. They are getting some dogs of their own so I don't have to own all the dogs.
     
  12. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I don't think I would be able to part with any puppies if I were to breed GSPs those little guys are just too cute!
     
  13. TDK

    TDK Member

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    Gsp are a nice breed, a lot of people breed them for show and pets so be careful the line you are dealing with. You are right females usually break out sooner than males for the fact they are like humans and the female sex usually matures a little earlier. I train dogs here in the south and just be careful on what you are buying. Just as easy to feed a good one as a sorry one. Trae
     
  14. TDK

    TDK Member

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    I am not a gsp guy I own and run a kennel of English pointers but have trained 40-50 in the past 20 years. Their noses are as good as any breed what seperates them is style and range. But lack of nose isn't entirely true. Boils down to each his own. Trae
     
  15. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    If you want to know what your pup will be like as an adult, look at it's parents. Dogs are simply a bucket of genetics. What they are is what their parents gave them.
     
  16. TDK

    TDK Member

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    wireguy, good answer. Like breeds like. Trae
     
  17. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I believe what EE is saying. None the less, I love my GSPs and they are super dogs in my book. Real or imagined qualities what's the difference.
     
  18. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    When it comes to hunting dogs, there's way more qualified dogs than hunters owning them! I feel people should be licensed to own instead of the dogs, regardless of breed! I liked the GSP I had years ago, good bird finder and loyal. Good bird dogs come in several breeds and my latest is the French Brittany. Making a dandy little bird dog too and has since her first outing after wild quail at 5 months old!

    Hap
     
  19. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    Breeding will tell! Start training at about 3 months. Don't be too harsh in correction. 10 to 15 minutes per session is enough for a start. Introduce her to birds at an early age. Condition her to loud, sudden sounds to avoid gunshyness. In training - AVOID EYE CONTACT. The easiest way to ruin a pup is to make eye contact after shooting a gun "to see if she is gunshy". That will surely make her so.

    Anyone who says, "I don't believe in training. They train themselves", is simply WRONG. That being said, know what you are doing when you attempt to train a young pup.

    Don't take the pup too young. I prefer 8 weeks before separating from litter-mates and mother.
     
  20. TDK

    TDK Member

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    Even well bred dogs don't all turn out. This busines would be too easy if every dog bred was a great gundog. Introduce her to birds when she is ready. Loud noises and stuff really are irrelevant she won't be hunting in your house or yard. When you put her on birds make sure she is ready as said take it slow and let her be a pup. Don't expect her to be a broke dog from day one. I break pointers to the gun by shooting a .22 as they chase birds after flush. That way you associate a fun thing with the flight of the bird. I have never had a gunshy dog and train up to 30 per year. Just remember the younger she is the greater chance of causing faults such as blinking, bird shyness and gunshyness. Which are all man made faults. Later Trae
     
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