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Shooting tips when switching guns

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by typhoon, Apr 17, 2012.

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  1. typhoon

    typhoon TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    I've been shooting the same gun for several years with good success, but recently busted an ejector and may want to enter another shoot before it's fixed. I have a back-up, but have shot it very little. I am deliberately avoiding going into the specifics between the two guns. Suffice it to say they are quite different brands, but one reason I bought the back-up was it's similar fit & feel to my main gun. I will say the back-up has a higher rib.

    Assuming both guns fit, or are very close, any short-cuts for a smooth transition from one gun to another? As an FYI, the very first time I shot the back-up, I broke 23 of 25 with it. My personal best event with the "main" gun was a 98 at 16 yards.
     
  2. Oregunner

    Oregunner Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Oregon
    I shoot lots of different guns. It's part of the fun of the sport for me. The main difference that I have to get used to, when using a different gun, is the trigger pull. I spend a few minutes dry firing the gun, with snap caps if an O/U, to get used to the creep and pressure needed to pull the trigger. Other than that, it's mental thing if the POI/POA is significantly different than what I have been shooting. Mount the gun, call for the bird, see the bird, shoot the bird. Mark
     
  3. chiefjon

    chiefjon Active Member

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    Location:
    El Dorado Hills, CA
    I change guns on occasion, just because I can...LOL...but, seriously, the first thing I do is have the trap set to throw straight away birds. I start on post 3 then work out both ways till I am comfortable with the sight picture, mounting the gun, trigger pull, reloading and breaking birds consistantly. I think confidence in your gun is critical and knowing you can break bird with the new gun is a good start. IMHO...

    JON
     
  4. typhoon

    typhoon TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    These are both good tips. I especially like the mounting and dry firing tip, as you can do it anywhere and does not cost anything :).

    Shooting straight-away targets is also a good idea. Any other ideas are welcome.

    Thanks!
     
  5. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

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    Don't change guns. Pick one, get it to fit and stay put.




    Guy Babin
     
  6. RayReys

    RayReys Member

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    Sep 8, 2011
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    381
    I'm with Oregunner on this one...I've been using 5 'main' guns for trap and (recently) sporting clays, which doesn't include occasional use of my 20ga guns for fun, and I'm pretty consistent with whatever I shoot...(though I still have off days with any one of them haha)

    Me personally, I can shoot a shotgun I've never shot and do fairly well... I don't really think about it much other than, "let's shoot this one" and I simply have at it and adjust as necessary. I can't shoot that well with my SxS though - I'm still working on getting used to that sight picture :)
     
  7. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
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    Put your main gun on a pattern board at 25 yards and measure the point of impact. Do it 5 times. Then adjust your backup gun to shoot the same place on the pattern board.

    It's a start.
     
  8. typhoon

    typhoon TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Dear Guy, I'd rather not change guns, but as I said at the beginning, I don't have choice if I want to shoot anytime soon. Old faithful is awaiting parts and repair.

    Setterman, I like your tip but don't have a conveneint place to pattern. Besides, sometimes ignorance is bliss. I have a book by a well known shooter who sees little value in patterning. For one thing, shooting off the bench is a lot different than shooting off your shoulder. This is why I like Jon's tip of shooting strait-away birds better.

    Anyway, thanks for the advice.
     
  9. dward

    dward Member

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    I'm with Setterman on this one. I would/did pattern at 15 yds from a rest to simply see where point of impact is compared to the other gun. I bought a 2000rs last fall after shooting an mx8 for years. I didn't pattern it and actually thought I was shooting low when in fact I found out it was a tad high.

    Why wonder when you can know.
     
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