1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Shooting stance and weight distribution on feet

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by rsikole, Jul 12, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. rsikole

    rsikole Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2009
    Messages:
    302
    I'm interested in hearing experiences from shooters who have struggled/succeeded in developing a shooting stance which helps them break targets. I see all kinds of stances and many shooters seem to shoot well with no particular stance and no attention to stance.

    1. Is your stance important to you?
    2. What helped you develop your stance?
    3. If you lean forward and distribute more weight to your front foot, do you sturggle to maintain that stance while moving the gun to the target?
    4. What makes it difficult to maintain a particular stance while moving the gun? Not seeing targets well? High targets?
    5. What helps you to maintain your stance while shooting?
    6. Is your stance important to you?
    7. If you have a stance when you call for the target, is it important for you to maintain that stance while moving the gun?

    Thanks for your feedback!

    Rob
     
  2. yakimaman

    yakimaman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,738
    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio
    I don't think there's really any objective support for a paticular stance. I watched a video by a well known shooter and tried for quite a while to follow his recommendations but it just didn't work. He's built like a fireplug and I'm not. Different things for different folks. Balance is what effects me more than anything (but still trying that Remington thing about having both feet on a line parallel to the line of a hard breaking left target at #5 - it ain't working either)
     
  3. Hal1225

    Hal1225 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Messages:
    442
    My friend has had lessons by 3 or 4 of the top teachers (Phil, Nora and others)and has a lean forward style with his back right foot about 90 degrees, at station 3 it is parallel to the house and toe is pointing to the right. He shoots very well. I choose to set my own style and shoot poorly. I could copy his but I won't. He also has shot over 30,000 registered targets and maybe 30,000 not registered. I only shot 400 registered and 500 not registered so far. Stopped shooting for the last 20 years and just took it up again. I have to get very lucky to be respectable with so little practice and the stance is only part of the issues.

    Harry
     
  4. trap906

    trap906 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    Messages:
    252
    something you might try. walk up to the line drawn on the concrete. looking at the line, put both toes up even with the line, feet about as wide apart as your shoulders. this will put you facing the house dead ahead, but will change slightly at each station. now put your right foot slightly too the right and behind. in other words your right foot will be almost 90 degrees to the left. now slightly bend your left knee pointing it forward, not too extreme or you will be crouching. now bring the gun to your shoulder and face, dont try to bring your head to the gun, bring the gun to your head. only slight weight on your left foot. try swinging the gun all the way to your left and then to your right, remember to move your whole upper body from waist up, not just your arms. if you can't get to the extreme left or right you may have too adjust yourself either way slightly. you must set up at each station differently to be able to swing to the extreme target at that station. always set up for the hardest target you may get from each station.
     
  5. 7remmag

    7remmag Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2011
    Messages:
    40
    What I have found is that maintaining the same stance while on each station. I'm a left handed shooter and after reading this I shot a round and paid careful attention to my stance. I found that I stand up straight, but I do place more weight on my front foot. From talking to the old timers that I shoot with and from my own experience I've found that It may not necessarily be your stance that is effecting your score, but the way you hold your gun. I have an adjustable comb on my Browning Citori and I have it adjusted so that I hold the gun in the same position every time. Something you may want to look into is the way in which you hold your gun, because if your hold is inconsistent, then your shot pattern will be at different heights. I hope this helps.

    Kyle
     
  6. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,521
    Location:
    Idaho
    The Daro Handy DVD covers the stance & I learned a lot that worked for me
     
  7. sliverbulletexpress

    sliverbulletexpress TS Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2009
    Messages:
    2,645
    If you watch the best shooters their guns don't seem to recoil, a lot of that comes from stance. Stance is the foundation of your shooting.
     
  8. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    8,542
    Location:
    HELL, MICHIGAN
    My 2 cents worth. Feet parallel to post 5 from all posts to start. (Lefties post 1).
    Feet shoulder width or less. Weight slightly on front foot.
     
  9. GoDawgs

    GoDawgs Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    285
    Here's a good starting point for stance..........

    Walk up to the line without a gun next time you're at the range. Go to any random station.

    With your left arm, point to where you break a hard left target from that station. While keeping that left arm up, point to where you break a hard right target from that station. Find the middle point between those two points and align your body to that middle point.

    Then, with your body aligned to that middle point, put your hands up like you're in a boxing stance and you're going to spar with someone standing in front of you (put your hands up, bend your knees to a comfortable level, etc). That is your natural athletic stance.

    You are now aligned properly to the field and you are in a stance that is naturally athletic for you.
     
  10. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    14,711
    Location:
    NW Wisconsin
    Get Campbell's DVD and do as he teaches. His "press" is the only way to go.
     
  11. FlaLagarto

    FlaLagarto Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,458
    This is another of those subjects where you have as many answers as you do shooters.. Not everything that works for Phil, Nora, Harlan or Leo will work for you..

    I offer one point to pay attention to.. "Distance between the feet" this is a key factor in being able to rotate .. try it, the wider the stance the harder it is to turn.

    Jerry B
     
  12. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,330
    Location:
    Shawnee, Kansas, USA
    My stance is probably closer to Todd Bender's skeet stance. I don't get quite as low as he does.
     
  13. rsikole

    rsikole Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2009
    Messages:
    302
    Thanks for all of the feedback! I'm going to try changing a few things in my stance to see if I can improve my consistency.

    Rob
     
  14. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Messages:
    11,136
    Rob, Just copy Dinky. He's a little off center, but nobody's perfect.
     
  15. benedict1

    benedict1 TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2010
    Messages:
    174
    I am really struggling with a stance problem. I have bad feet--plantar fascitis in both and also some nerve problems that cause my feet to hurt most of the time. I have to wear extra cushion insoles and soft arch supports almost all the time. Problem: I wobble with all that soft stuff in my shoes! Nothing worse than trying to hit at target when you can't set up steadily. The idea above that seems it might work is the comment by BigM-Perazzi. Would he please explain it a little more? I shoot left-handed and it seems that if I keep my right foot parallel to the front of the trap house on all posts and put a slight amount of weight forward I am pretty steady. Of course, this closes my stance as I move across the posts, contrary to what most of the experts say, i. e., you should open your stance more from 1-to-5(opposite for right-handed)

    I could really use some advice. Do any of you have the same foot/arch support problems? Yesterday I wore my old hunting boots with thin cushions and one heel cushion on the back foot, the one with the worst arch problem. The firmer sole is tolerable in the boots if I don't try to walk too much. But, I could sure use some other ideas. Thanks.
     
  16. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,775
    Have you tried Danner Air thotics? They are ventilated heelcups with arch supports. Even without cushioned insoles they make walking or standing much more comfortable. Search the Danner website for details.
     
  17. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,775
    I believe that stance, foot postion and hold point are related. For example, at Post 1 if you shift your foot position to favor the sharp left target and hold over the center of the house your body will be slightly cocked to the right. That's OK because every target will either be a straight-away or a left-hand target. You will only be "unwinding" in the direction all target will go. As you move to Posts 2 through 5 you will have to adjust your foot position and hold points accordingly.

    As far as stance is concerned, the classic shotgun stance is both feet flat on the ground, both knees straight and weight slightly forward on your lead foot -don't raise the heel on your trailing foot. Many people find this uncomfortable and choose to bend their leading knee. Whatever work for you but starting with the "classic" stance is always a good start. Also, avoid too wide a stance as this limits rotation of the hips.
     
  18. benedict1

    benedict1 TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2010
    Messages:
    174
    Thanks for the Danner advice. I just ordered a pair. They may do the job and not be so soft and wobbly in my shoe. This is driving me nuts. I can shoot pretty good, when I'm not trying to stand still!
     
  19. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    8,542
    Location:
    HELL, MICHIGAN
    Benedict, having a closed stanch is fine as long as it allows you to comfortably swing to the right
    hand targets without binding up. Normally you would have your toes on a line parallel to a post 1 line drawn to the center of the traphouse. But, if you're on a line parallel to post 3 and can swing, go with it.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page

shotgun weight distribution

,

trap shooting weight distribution

,

weight distribution foot when shooting

,

weight distribution foot when shooting a gun

,

weight distribution in feet

,

weight on foot when shooting