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Shooting in the rain

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by ebc, Apr 6, 2008.

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  1. ebc

    ebc TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Greetings,
    I am interested in problems that may occur when an O/U gets soaked during a shoot. I have a Kolar and have heard that the triggers start to double when wet. There is a good chance of getting wet at a shoot I will be attending soon. Any tips or observations appreciated.
    Thanks,
    ebc
     
  2. K80433SC

    K80433SC Member

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    As a Krieghoff man, I have no experience with what you described about trigger "doubling" with the Kolar - when wet.

    About the only thing I do when I get my gun VERY soaked, is to remove the stock and blow it out with an air compressor. I'll spray WD40 or whatever you prefer onto the hammers, springs, pins, etc -- and then blow it with air again to remove excessive lubricant.
     
  3. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    I get guns wet all the time. This is Oregon. It rains once a year here - September through June.<br>
    <br>
    I'm glad I have gas heat. I strip the gun(s), wipe down what I can, then put the actions over the heater grate and crank up the heat. This dries them out quite well. Inspect for water damage, then clean and lube as usual.<br>
    <br>
    The one thing you cannot do is put off attending to them. You might see about getting the Birchwood-Casey Sheath wipes that come in the sealed packages. Keep some in your vehicle, and wipe down the exterior with them if the gun gets wet, after using a dry rag. This will help prevent surface rust on the blueing.
     
  4. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Shoot international trap. The firing points are covered. The shooters stay nice and dry. Click on www.issf.tv/ and take a look. HMB
     
  5. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    I'll say it again but not argue over and over. I've used WD-40 on my auto pistols, revolvers, rifles, shotguns and a few other items since it came to public use. I'll spray parts, especially water wet parts liberally and blow and wipe out as much moisture and/or goo and then lube as I would were the piece just good and dirty. I clean barrels with WD-40 and whatever device in all my firearms. After at least 35 years of this use, I've had not one firearm "...eventually turn into a gummy mess requiring the arm to be detail stripped and cleaned.any small parts need to be replaced."

    I have had one gun that turned into such a gummy mess that it required soaking in kerosene and a total breakdown, lube, and re-assembly during that time - it was liberally cleaned with Hoppes #9 by my father-in-law then left standing in a closet for about 15 years before his death. I suggest it possible that nearly any such product could become a problem if handled in that manner.

    I do not soak any previously listed items and then assemble them dripping with WD-40 which I suggest would not be a good thing with any cleaner. Everything is well wiped and blown out. My wipe rag is a many year old and rejected T shirt that has many years of soaked up WD-40 on it. Yes I use 9s at 16 yards, skeet and some sporties and, yes, I use WD-40 to clean my firearms. If it isn't what you want, don't do it....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  6. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    Ditto to what BDodd said.
     
  7. BILL GRILL

    BILL GRILL Well-Known Member

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    This has to win for stupidist thread ever! How old are you?
     
  8. ebc

    ebc TS Member

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    I am 52. What is stupid about asking a technical question?
    EBC
     
  9. alfermann66

    alfermann66 Member

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    I shoot an 1100 mag at Jackpot with 1 3/8 oz. buffered 4's. The buffering apparently is caustic. I have two choices; 1. Clean the action with WD-40(Water Dispersant formula #40) or have a badly rusted gun the next morning. Nothing else has worked. Blow out/wipe out the excess and the gun is ready to go next week. Two and 1/2 years of this at 100+ rds per week and she's still banging.

    Buz
     
  10. 22hornet

    22hornet Well-Known Member

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    Google Brownell's corrosion test. Good old WD-40 did pretty darn good.
     
  11. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Hey Sarge - We seem to go through this discussion at least once a year on the forum. I said and meant I won't argue further and please do understand I mean no flames at you. However, if in 35 years or more using the stuff in a manner that seems sensible and having zero complaints, I have no plans to change my routine. I'm still waiting for my first bad experience with it. Like said above, view Brownell's corrosion test for some "other" meaningful history. BTW, I, too, spent a few hours working on departmental firearms but admittedly not as deeply as you seem to have. I reckon there is a reason why they paint refrigerators different colors and we have so many models of the same car. Whatever works for the individual is the right way, eh?....Bob Dodd
     
  12. deckart

    deckart TS Member

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    Bob, I think the main confusion is from not reading your explanation that you use WD and then "blow off the excess". Even something like gasoline will turn to powder in a dozen years or so if not drained from carbs. I am sure you would not use WD40 it if it harmed your guns.
     
  13. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    WD 40 is probably not the best long term lubricant available, but it is one of the very best for displacing water. Lubricants are designed to do different things. If you want long term protection, select one with some wax in it such as RIG. If you want reduced friction (lubricity) do not use one with wax. If you want an oil that is a good cleaning agent, get one with a lot of solvents, but don't expect it to give good lubricity or long term protection.

    All oil treatments, when mixed with dirt will form a grinding compound that is good for fitting two parts together, but after the parts are fitted, the mixture of oil/dirt will result in excessive wear.

    Fortunately, the lubrication requirements for guns are not demanding. An automobile engine needs a lubricant that can operate at high RPMs and temperature under many tons of stress. An airplane cable needs a lubricant that can work when changing from -25 F to 100 F in a 45 seconds. Guns need a lubricant that will allow a few parts to move a couple of hundred times under low pressure over several hours. It is hard to find one that will not work as long as it is kept clean.

    Pat Ireland
     
  14. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Exactly Deckart. Using it sensibly was included in my remarks. I've always assumed flooding a gun with any cleaner, lube, or whatever and then standing it in your closet or safe could or would cause problems if left for years. My father-in-law's example with Hoppe's #9 was a model 62 Winchester pump .22 and it wouldn't even open let along operate - glued together with varnish after about 15 years. I've seen gasoline in a mower turn to varnish in the mini carburetor in just one winter period outside....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  15. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    A very light coating of RIG grease before shooting and a good wiping and light oiling with your choice of lube after. Wax on the wood and sealer on any open areas in the interior (I use Linseed Oil or other finish). Be sure to dry out any wet areas in the wood as well. I'll agree with PAT that RIG is a great protectant. WD-40 may be OK to get the water out, but I don't like if for the long term. My autos get Break Free as a rule, on the working parts. Exterior metal surfaces still get RIG.
     
  16. 2str8

    2str8 TS Member

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    I use RemOil and blow it out too. In the forearm I have linseed oil in some guns and wax in others. better than nothing.
     
  17. aaastalker

    aaastalker TS Member

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    WHy ?

    I would rather be fishing ...

    But I love WD-40 over 1 million uses


    AAA
     
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