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Shooting Glasses Problem and Question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Easystreet, Sep 11, 2009.

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  1. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    I've been using a variety of shooting glasses over the years (mostly cheap ones) and now I'm thinking of buying some better ones.

    Here is a problem that I frequently have with shooting glasses. First, my glasses tend to fog up a lot here in Florida at certain times of the year and day.

    Second, when I have the gun mounted, my right eye (I'm right handed) is looking VERY CLOSE to the nose piece. On some styles of glasses, this nose piece (or support) actually interferes with a portion of my field of view with my right eye. In other words, my right eye is looking out of the extreme upper left corner of the right lense. My left eye is looking out of the upper left corner of the left lense, but that eye generally isn't a problem.

    So, which style or brand of shooting glasses will put the lenses high and away from my face so that they don't fog and also have a very small or narrow nose piece so that it doesn't interfere with my vision out of my right eye?

    BTW, I won't use plastic lenses. I want polycarbonate. I'm looking for the non-prescription variety, but would want the ability to put prescription lenses in the same frames if I should need them.

    Thanks.

    Easystreet
     
  2. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Easystreet- First, there are anti fogging solutions available but hand soap will work well. Blinders increase the fogging problem. Water condenses from perspiration from your forehead. An anti perspirant on your forehead may help some.

    Your second problem seems to me to involve getting your glasses adjusted properly for you. Someone with a small pair of pliers and some knowledge can adjust them for you. If you get glasses at a shoot, select a vendor who knows how to fit glasses. These are the ones who only sell glasses. I like Decot glasses but there are other good brands to choose from.

    Pat Ireland
     
  3. kiwiG

    kiwiG Member

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    Hi Easysteet, Only one piece of advice from me...Get the person who sells you the glasses to alter the frame. If you bust the frames yourself, with your wee pliers, in the privacy of your own home...it is your problem. If the vendor damages the frame it should be their problem. Cheers-Graham.
     
  4. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    The shooting glasses I've been using have plastic frames and rubber nose pieces, so there is no "adjusting" to them.

    Easystreet
     
  5. philk

    philk Member

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    Easystreet, polycarbonate is plastic.
     
  6. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    I use the Randolph Ranger, but mine are prescription, I could not use the one designed to raise and lower the nose piece as it interfered w/my sight picture, I was seeing the mose piece. I exchanged them w/Randolph. There are different styles to choose from, I like the Frame that has the lenses closer together at the top of the frame. And you can get prescription lenses later as they snap in.


    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  7. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    PhilK,

    No, polycarbonate is not plastic. The plastic used in lenses is usually CR-39 plastic and it has only about 10% of the strength and shatter resistance of polycarbonate lenses. Polycarbonate lenses are MUCH safer than plastic lenses.

    Easystreet
     
  8. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    Gary Bryant,

    Yeah, the ones with the lenses close together at the top of the frame sounds like the ones I'm looking for. Do you have the regular Ranger glasses or the XL Ranger glasses?

    Easystreet
     
  9. otnot

    otnot Active Member

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    I would have to agree with Doggai. It sounds like your head is not in an upright position when your gun is mounted which is causing you to look out of the corner of your eye. Mount your gun and look at yourself in the mirror.
     
  10. Mojo

    Mojo Member

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    Location:
    Sebastian, FL
    Easystreet - motorcycle goggles are a problem - the best anti-fog we have found for our customers is Parkers Perfect. You can get it thru Cabelas or
    our website. Keeping the inside of the lenses as clean as possible helps a
    lot. It gives moisture nothing to clean to.

    Polycarbonate is preferred for most sports due to its shatter resistant qualities. It is not the best material for clarity - Trivex is. It also
    has a high impact restance and passes FDA standards for safety glasses.
    It also provides maximum UV protection.

    I battle with the metal frame vs. plastic frame war everytime I shoot.
    The nose pad supports are in my field of vision. It helps to keep your eyes
    as level as possible and your head up.

    Decot HyWyds seem to be the best for me. But I wear a pair of Wiley X plastic
    frames with a one piece lens most of the time. A light tint works better than
    a darker one.

    Mike Lewis
    riderseye.com
     
  11. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    Here is a good description of the difference between polycarbonate and plastic:

    "What is the difference between polycarbonate, glass or CR-39 plastic lenses?"

    Glass: Glass offers the best optical clarity, meaning that there is virtually no distortion in glass lenses. This is why it is the material of choice in manufacturers such as Ray-Ban, Revo, Vuarnet, and Serengeti. However, glass is the least impact resistant of all of the material, and may shatter upon impact. Shattering means that the lens will split into small pieces which can easily enter the eye and cause permanent eye injuries or even blindness. Therefore, glass is not recommended for any active sports where a fall or a hit by a ball can shatter the lens. It is also the heaviest of all the materials which may limit the length of time these lenses can be worn. However, glass is the most scratch resistant of all materials.

    Plastic: CR-39 refers to the type of plastic that is used to make prescription lenses. This is optical plastic and provides very little distortion (more than glass but less than polycarbonate). It is more lightweight and thinner than glass making it comfortable to wear. It is more impact resistant than glass, but may still break and shatter upon impact. Therefore, it is not recommended for active sports. It is more scratch resistant than polycarbonate, but will scratch if not properly taken care of.

    Polycarbonate: Polycarbonate is an impact resistant material. Most good polycarbonate can be shot at with a .38 caliber bullet and not shatter. It is becoming used more and more today especially for sports eyewear and sunglasses. Although polycarbonate is impact resistant, it should not be consider breakproof or shatterproof. However, polycarbonate is the strongest material available and will have the tendency to break in large pieces versus small pieces which are not as dangerous. Polycarbonate is the thinnest and lightest of all materials. However, the lens also has the most distortion of any lens, especially in wrap frames unless the lens is decentered. However, only those very sensitive to distortions will really notice it. Although tough, the material is actually softer meaning it is more susceptible to scratches. However, most polycarbonate lenses have scratch resistant coatings built in to help prevent scratching.
     
  12. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    Otnot,

    Perhaps I overstated the degree of my problem. While I do look through the upper left portion of my lenses, it may not be as extreme as it may sound. However, with the el cheapo shooting glasses I'm using now, the rubber nose piece does interfere with a portion of my vision, particularly if I'm looking for a left-to-right crosser in sporting clays.

    Perhaps I should have stated that I'm primarily a sporting clays (and sometimes skeet) shooter who often has to contend with targets coming from my left at about a 90 degree angle. Yes, I shoot trap some (very poorly usually), but trap is not my main shooting game. Sorry for the confusion.

    Easystreet
     
  13. hoffman06

    hoffman06 Member

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    Just call Mike Renard at Post 4 Optics, he can fix you up and answer any questions. Mike is a Trap Shooter, darn good to, and knows exactly what it takes in optics.
    Carey
     
  14. woodsman

    woodsman TS Member

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    I have been using Oakley M frame shooting glasses for a couple of years now and I find them to be very comfortable. They are light weight impact resistant and I don't see the nose piece while looking for the target. Fog is sometimes an issue but I use soapy water or the stuff that skin divers use on the masks and that works well. The M frames also have a vented version to assist with fog but I have not personally tried those lenses.

    Oakley does not have as many of the fancy color lenses to choose from but they have a couple that are great for shooting in general conditions and I have a clear for night shooting.

    The frames were not the cheapest out there but they can be found on ebay sometimes for lower cost, and the lenses cost about the same as a set for my old Decot's
     
  15. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Decot HyWydes will resolve your shooting glasses problem Easy. They aren't exactly chaep but they are worth the price. I use mine on the trap range and in the field. Good company to deal with also, visit their web site for more info.
     
  16. otnot

    otnot Active Member

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    In that case I would recommend Decot Hiwide frames. They sit high enough on your nose that you don't see the nose piece. You can also get prescription lenses for them.

    Jim
     
  17. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    EASYSTREET: They are not the XL series, the old frames were black, the new series are silver, and the space between lenses is 1/8th-3/16s inch wide, frames are silver. get a copy of your eye prescription and contact Clarence Willis of Custom Sportswear and Optical at 740-862-6066, I tried calling him but no answer, he may be at Michigan Team Shoot, he is a neighbor of mine, and has been doing my glasses for over 40 years now.

    My first pair of glasses were w/same frame but Glass Photo Gray lenses, with my prescription they were pretty heavy and made my nose sore, so switched to randolph Ranger Glasses, which are the Military Choice of glasses.

    I found him to be more reasonable than others.

    When I was getting my eyes checked I had the Optometrist fine tune my eyes with the horiz. and vert lines, my shooting glasses have my vision at 20-10
    I only use this script in my shooting glasses, my every day lenses are for 20/20.

    I also encourage all shooters to take a good eye vitamin, I personally like and use Bausch&Lamb OCUVITE, one every morning.

    I am 69 yrs old and want to help my eyes as much as possible.



    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  18. powderburn

    powderburn Member

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    Dear Easy,
    First of all, stay away from goggle type glasses. (Any of them that have just a nose rest that wraps around the top part of the nose.) Make sure they have nose PIECES that you can bend out to get the lenses away from your face. I bought to Remington glasses from ebay that have been wonderful. These come in a grey case with three sets of colors-yellow, amber, and vermillion. They are not fancy, but are great. Just keep an eye on ebay. It is dang hard to find good glasses anymore without big dollars. So many manufacturers are making them goggle-style, it drives me up the wall. I haven't had any trouble with fogging or any type of view interference either. I know what you mean, though. It is damn frustrating when they start fogging up! Good luck!
    -powderburn
     
  19. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    One more question about the Ranger shooting glasses. According to the Randolph Ranger site, they show only the earpiece that wraps completely around the back of the ear for these glasses. I've never been able to stand ear pieces that wrapped around the back of my ears. I like the ear pieces that have just a slight curvature to them just behind the ear, but Ranger isn't shown with this style ear piece.

    They show only the Ranger XLW with the "bayonet" style ear piece. Does anyone know where to get Ranger style glasses (or something very similar) with the bayonet style ear pieces?

    Thanks again.

    Easystreet
     
  20. philk

    philk Member

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    Ya well whatever Easystreet, by any definition of the word polycarbonate is still a plastic.
     
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