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Shooting better with hot loads

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by squib, Mar 3, 2009.

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  1. squib

    squib TS Member

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    I am a new skeet shooter. Have shot a total of 8 rounds over about 2 months. I have been shooting Remington Game Loads 12 gauge, 8 shot, 1 oz., 1290 fps. Not doing too bad with these loads for a beginner (averaging 14-18 per round). So last week I picked up a couple of boxes of the Remington Gun Club 12 gauge, 8 shot, 1 1/8 oz., 1145 fps. I shot the first two rounds with the Gun Club loads and shot probably the worst I have yet (10-14). Shot the last round with the old Game Loads and shot probably the best round yet (18-19). I patterned my shotgun with the Game Loads along with the other guys I shoot with. I had, by far, the tightest pattern of anybody. I was the only one shooting from a 30" barrel (the rest I think were all 28" barrels) and I was using a cylinder choke in the bottom and skeet choke on top. Anyway, it seems kind of weird to me that I shoot so much better with a faster load with a tighter pattern than I do with the slower loads. I am about to start reloading and wondering if I should experiment more or just go with a load that mirrors the game loads that I have been shooting pretty good with. I was thinking of keeping the same 1290 fps and 1 oz of shot, but maybe moving up to a 9 shot instead of 8 shot. What do you guys think?
     
  2. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    squib:

    You haven't shot enough targets to establish an average, a pattern, or a trend of any kind.

    Based only on the information you've posted, any additional comments would be meaningless speculation without anything to support it. Unless I miss my guess, there will be a parade of meaningless speculation to follow...

    sissy : )
     
  3. squib

    squib TS Member

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    Thanks for the reply Recoil Sissy. How many targets would you say I need to shoot to establish an average, pattern or trend?
     
  4. squib

    squib TS Member

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    Anybody else with advice or information I might find useful? I value any and all opinions and will not consider any replies meaningless speculation. Thanks.
     
  5. Shady Creek

    Shady Creek TS Member

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    If you like them, shoot them. Confidence means a lot......GOOD LUCK
     
  6. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    I think you should slow the load down and not put much faith in the score-results until you have more data to work with. Nines won't hurt.

    Neil
     
  7. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    When you have an average in the 22-23 range you might begin to see some trends. I think (I don't know anything for 100% certain) that the higher velocity loads are a detriment to beginners as they might tend to influence flinching or "anticipation". Several beginners at my club did better with 1150 fps 1 1/8 ounce loads.

    Learn from every shot.
     
  8. tom-n8ies

    tom-n8ies Member

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    Those game loads kick.

    One of the clubs near me gives them to the SCTP kids to shoot trap with, they do amazingly well with them, I have never had very good scores with them myself, probably just in my head.

    If you do best with them then by all means stick with them.

    tom
     
  9. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    I mostly shoot trap, but I am sure some of the same principles apply for skeet. If you get used to shooting with high velocity loads, that is what you will be best with. Every 25, 50, and 75 (I lost the 76th bird to ruin my 100 in a row) I have ever shot has been with the same low velocity shell. (1150 fps, one oz #7 1/2) I loaded thousands of those. If someone wanted me to try out their new high velocity loads, I tend to get way too far in front of the bird on hard rights and lefts, esp during handicap. Some people load up really hot loads for handicap, but I never broke any more with the hot loads then the load I was used to using. This is because I my personal "timing clock" is used to hitting with my normal loads. When you are learning any new game, it is generally best to eliminate hardware variables, so that you can concentrate just on your own skill set. Good luck and welcome to the game.
     
  10. bkt514

    bkt514 Well-Known Member

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    Squib, I'd shoot #8's @ 1145 fps. Gun Club Loads. More importantly, focus on good technique, focus and concentration, learn to see and hit the bird.
     
  11. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    A slower 1 1/8 ounce load would have the same recoil as a fast 1 ounce load. You will adjust your leads to the speed of your load. In time you would adapt to the slower load and shoot just as good scores. There is only a slight difference in leads but I can tell the difference. Whether I am shooting skeet, trap or sporting clays I always prefer the maximum payload at 1200 fps or slower to a lighter faster load. I like throwing more pellets. I do my practice with 7/8 ounce in a 20 gauge. When it counts I like 1 1/8 ounce in a 12 gauge.
     
  12. ec90t

    ec90t Guest

    Squib,

    I'm a bit of a newcomer to skeet shooting myself, and I usually shoot 22-24 with my 20ga bps. Let me tell you one thing, it's all about leads and timming. I shoot a 1200 fps 7/8oz load of 8.5's. This load is comfortable to shoot all day and blisters a bird. If you prefer a faster load then that's fine. Go out and practice a bit between 3 and 5 to get your substained leads. The other stations will fall into place accordingly. One big thing you can do to help your scores is foot placement.

    Just a little food for thought from another newbie.

    ec90t
     
  13. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    Skeet shooting is proper foot placement, the correct holding spot for your gun and the correct breaking point, sustained lead which is memorized at each station, then total concentration on each bird. The breaks then become automatic. You become a clay breaking robot. Like trap it is a game of perfection. My heart is pounding when I am in a competition. It is relief when it is over. The end of the round stops the pain.
     
  14. comp 1

    comp 1 Well-Known Member

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    Squib,probably the reason you do better with the fast loads is that less lead is required and a new shooter invariably shoots behind a lot of targets.There are many methods of shooting skeet:sustained lead,pull ahead, and swing through to name the most popular.Shooting the high powered loads is of no benefit if you have learned to swing the shotgun,but can sometimes result in a few more hits if you are a little slow or are spot shooting . They will cause more problems than they are worth--try 1 1/8 oz. of number 9 shot at 1145fps[standard skeet load] shown on the box as 1 1/8 oz. 2 3/4 dram equiv. There is NEVER any reason to shoot any shot size larger than 9. I have done well with number 10 shot and would shoot it more if I could find it.
     
  15. Trap4

    Trap4 Member

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    Go with 1 and 1/8 of #9 shot for skeet about 1145fps and don't ever change.

    Trap-4
     
  16. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    I think almost all top skeet shooters use sustained lead. I use swing through with trap and favor it for my sporting clays shooting. When I shoot skeet I practice swing through, sustained and pull away for my sporting clays. I can shoot a 25 in skeet with any of the three. I prefer swing through with a lighter gun like my 20 and sustained with a heavier gun like my 12 for skeet. With sustained lead it is easy to stop the swing of a light gun. My leads don't change no matter which method I use. I think sustained is favored in skeet because your lead is instantly obtained making the breaks quick.
     
  17. squib

    squib TS Member

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    Thanks for all the feedback. Think I will try the 1145fps #9's at 1 1/8 oz. next time. I know I still have a lot to learn but I'm having a hell of a time in the process. LMAO at EE... I bet you're a Ford is better than Chevy guy too aren't you? I would liken asking my question here more to asking a trout fisherman who fly fishes about techniques for catching trout with a spinning reel. We're both after the same game, just using different techniques. But, anyway, I don't really have time to get in a pi___ng contest with a guy with Napoleon Syndrome anyway. (Look it up EE.)
     
  18. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    Use what you like and what works for you. There are some shooters that shoot better with their 20 gauge loads than their 12 gauge loads.
     
  19. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    The best scores I've seen shot on a skeet field were shot using International loads. There moving around 1350 so much for the 1145 advise.

    In skeet there is much more lead and for a new shooter it is understandable that they may shoot better with faster shells.

    Many Sporting Clays shooters are fond of the expression Speed Kills!

    Second the faster you push a 1 oz load the tighter it patterns.

    It is true that you have not shot enough to establish a reliable average but your observations seem to be valid.

    Joe
     
  20. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    There is a speed you will reach if you keep pushing it where your pattern will come apart. You also need to be mindful of recoil. You start flinching and your scores will tank. At the range you shoot skeet you are only talking inches difference in lead anyway. The difference in lead is far less than the diameter of your effective pattern.
     
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