1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Shooting After Shoulder Surgery

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by birdogs, Aug 25, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,775
    I have not shot a single target in the 2007 target year because of a problem with my shoulder. I tried physical therapy and it got better but not really well. I had an MRI which shows a rotator cuff tear that can only be repaired surgically. It is in the shoulder where I place the butt of the gun.

    Has anybody had this surgery and did it help your mobility, range of motion and elimination of pain? Have you been able to shoot since?
     
  2. Beretta687EELL

    Beretta687EELL Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,732
    I've had both shoulders done. IMHO, it is a very painful process, but worth going through, if the injury has affected your life to the point it appears to have in your case. I have no pain related to shooting and can shoot all day long. The surgery won't make you new again, but is a much better option that what you are living now. As with all surgeries and injuries of this type arthritis is a problem, but manageable. Based on my experience, I suggest you find the best surgeon you can and have the surgery done. The other key is the physiotherapy ... do exactly what they tell you ... no more, no less. Keep your elbows below shoulder height as much as possible. Good luck. Bill Malcolm
     
  3. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,055
    Location:
    Near but not in chicago
    I've had five surgeries on the same shoulder. The key is the rehab and you staying at it. The rotator cuff is what allows you to pick up your arm being that it's the shoulder that you place the gun at you won't shoot for a month or so due to the tenderness of the surgical site. I've had to have a complete shoulder replacement and four other lesser surgiers over the years so rehab therapy has become second nature. Work with the therapist and find a exceptional surgeon that undersatnds that shooting is a priority for you. i don't know where your located but should you be in the northern Illinois area I can recommend my surgeon hes exceptional na has a sense of humor, he needs it with me as a patient.
     
  4. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,775
    Bill Malcolm'

    Thanks for the response. You say, "Keep your elbows below shoulder height as much as possible." For how long? Forever? Does this become a permanently restrictive motion?

    Tony C
     
  5. Beretta687EELL

    Beretta687EELL Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,732
    Tony, Forever is my philosophy. Working overhead is the hardest thing on shoulders. If possible I keep my elbows down and when I do have to raise them over shoulder height, I'm careful. It becomes second nature. If you make your living in a job that requires you to work overhead, I suggest you look for a new job. Bill Malcolm
     
  6. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,775
    Bruce'

    I am in the New York City area (new Jersey actually). I have met with 2 surgeons, both highly recommended and am relying on my primary care physician to make the final choice. I am retired but do somew consulting work so I really don't have to keep my arms overhead in my work. But what happens if the police show up and say,"Put your hands up"?

    I have a friend who had replecemnt surgery that had to be "undone" that is, he had all the implants, screws etc. removed because of a mild infection they could not clear up. He has actually recoved quite nicely and hunts every week.

    Bruce and Bill,

    Thanks for your input. Believe me, I value it greatly and will be guided by it.
     
  7. Beretta687EELL

    Beretta687EELL Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,732
    Just raise your hands slowly (LOL). Bill Malcolm
     
  8. Hauser

    Hauser Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    860
    Had my right shoulder replaced and was back shooting in 10 days. It hurt for a couple of weeks after that but I had complete mobility restored. The main problem I had was fatigue not pain.


    Jerry Hauser
     
  9. bow377

    bow377 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    142
    I had it done in 1992 the year after I retired, Bill Malcom is right (as always), so is Bruce Spelht, I't painful for a while, but I was back to shooting in about 4 months. It will give that shoulder 20 more years of life.
     
  10. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,775
    arrow1920.

    You say, "It will give that shoulder 20 more years of life."
    Since I probably dont have 20 years more, can I leave it in my will?
     
  11. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,003
    I had both shoulders done five years or so ago. My right shoulder was quite OK to shoot within a couple of months. The left took a little longer due to some nerve impingements. My right now takes a pounding from rifles, shotguns, etc. No trouble, but the left arm is weak from nerve impingements in the neck. The shoulder is fine, however. Do the Physical Therapy. Don't overdo it! Work a little at home each day as they tell you. The surgery isn't too bad, but make sure to take your pain meds after the surgery, especially if they give you a nerve block. Once the block wears off, the pain will hit you like a brick. Get the best pain meds they will give you and get enough. The first three or four days are the roughest. After that it's easy. If the doctor tells you to move the arm after surgery, do so by moving it with the other arm and/or walking the hand up a wall or door frame. Don't use the muscles in the arm and shoulder you had the surgery in. Ice packs help a bit too, especially after the physical terrorist gets done.

    Just be careful not to re-injure your shoulder. Strengthening the muscles and keeping the joint active helps. When you are done with the physical terrorist, keep up on the excersizes. Work with BOTH shoulders.

    Good luck! Quack
     
  12. Release Trigger

    Release Trigger Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    400
    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    Birdogs,

    I am 12 weeks into recovery from total left shoulder replacement, Doc says another 8 weeks before he will let me shoot.

    Surgery was not to difficult but going to the club every weekend and watching my Buddies and my Wife have all the fun is.

    Biggest problem I have is convincing the Doc I feel like a new man his answer is he has never operated on a compulsive "Trapshooter" before and if I shoot before he gives me the go ahead and I cause myself problems well then it's on my own head.

    In the last few years I have had four knee replacements, one total left foot reconstruction and am still to have the other shoulder total replaced within next 12 months, felt pretty sorry for myself until I visited some kids in the cancer ward, mate that really puts it in perspective.

    Listen to your Doc and follow the physio to the letter and it is not that big a deal after all, life is great when the pain stops.

    Release Trigger..............

    PS. Good luck and God Bless.
     
  13. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,055
    Location:
    Near but not in chicago
    I will be having part of my total shoulder replacement removed at Christmas time. I had 11 fantastic years, no pain and a greater range of motion than I had for the thrity years prior to the replacement, well now the socket is moving and the hole for the pin that holds the socket in place is enlarging. Doc say we tkae it out and put in some donor bone and then leave the socket segment out. The humurs (titanium) will reamin in place and I hope to be shooting in February
     
  14. Longhorn

    Longhorn Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    287
    In March I had rotator cuff surgery along with repairing a torn bicep tendon. I have had great results in range of motion and continue to work my exercises. My therapist and surgeon have told me not to shoot. I will be going in Sept. 5 and will be asking the surgeon about the possibility of shooting. He told me two months ago that he did not want me shooting this year. I will follow his directions and will do my exercises. My son is a PT and he too says to try and keep elbows below shoulder height and avoid as much as possible doing work over your head. Surgery results have been great and despite the first 3-4 days of pain and sleeping in the lazy boy chair, it was well worth it.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page

firing a shotgun after shoulder replacement surgery

,

shooting after shoulder surgery