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Shooting a New Gun

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by FNG, Apr 24, 2011.

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  1. FNG

    FNG Member

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    It sems that trapshooters are, generally speaking, notorious for trading/buying/selling guns to find the one that's "just right" for them. Given that a gun works properly (mechanically) and that a person can get the patterns & P.O.I. adjusted where he/she wants it, and things like barrel length, balance are satisfactory, is there any logical reason a person wouldn't be able to learn to shoot well with any gun ? It would seem that stock fit would be the determining factor; getting the gun to shoot where you're looking while being able to shoot comfortably (minimizing felt recoil, muzzle jump, cheek slap, etc.) I think what I'm asking here is: is stock fit the critical factor. Thanks for your thoughts.
     
  2. Martinpicker

    Martinpicker Active Member

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    I would think you are about right, if the gun fits and shoots where you want it to, you should be ab le to break birds with it. Jack
     
  3. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Stock fit is critical, but for some reason some guns seem easier to shoot good scores than others. Maybe it's the weight of the gun, maybe it's the trigger, or the way the gun is balanced? You state "It seems that trapshooters are, generally speaking, notorious for trading/buying/selling guns to find the one that's "just right" for them". I believe that shooters trade and buy guns to find the magic wand that will allow them to break 1 or maybe two extra targets.
    Steve Balistreri
     
  4. Spanky

    Spanky Active Member

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    I would think any gun that is not ill fitting can be learned to shot pretty well. My BT-99 and Citori Trap are not adjustable but shoot basically the same place and have not been an issue.

    I'm sort of working with a new gun a Beretta Gold Parallel Target. My intent was more for skeet, 5-stand and sporting with it. I need a bit more time of comb adjusting, poi and patterning work to get it where I want it. Getting the length of pull is my starting point. I'm a big fan of the Beretta target autos and own a few. I'm not recoil sensative and the Berettas have little recoil at all making 2nd shots easier.
     
  5. goose2

    goose2 Well-Known Member

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    I had an old boy tell me that a gun change will take 5000 rounds to figure out. I find him to be fairly close. There are several things that come into play.
     
  6. SMOKEIT

    SMOKEIT Well-Known Member

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    Number 1--Stock fit

    Number 2--Trigger function/Lock time

    Number 3--POI

    Number 4--Moment of inertia of the gun--Swing Factor

    Number 5--Shells
     
  7. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    There are many parts to the equation. One important part is the trigger. It would be nice to have a shotgun with an adjustable trigger. But those are few and far between. HMB
     
  8. Chipmaker

    Chipmaker Active Member

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    The moment of inertia of an object about a given axis describes how difficult it is to change its angular motion about that axis. Therefore, it encompasses not just how much mass the object has overall, but how far each bit of mass is from the axis. The farther out the object's mass is, the more rotational inertia the object has, and the more force is required to change its rotation rate. For example, consider two hoops, A and B, made of the same material and of equal mass. Hoop A is larger in diameter but thinner than B. It requires more effort to accelerate hoop A (change its angular velocity) because its mass is distributed farther from its axis of rotation: mass that is farther out from that axis must, for a given angular velocity, move more quickly than mass closer in. So in this case, hoop A has a larger moment of inertia than hoop B.
    Divers reducing their moments of inertia to increase their rates of rotation

    The moment of inertia of an object can change if its shape changes. Figure skaters who begin a spin with arms outstretched provide a striking example. By pulling in their arms, they reduce their moment of inertia, causing them to spin faster (by the conservation of angular momentum).

    The moment of inertia has two forms, a scalar form, I, (used when the axis of rotation is specified) and a more general tensor form that does not require the axis of rotation to be specified. The scalar moment of inertia, I, (often called simply the "moment of inertia") allows a succinct analysis of many simple problems in rotational dynamics, such as objects rolling down inclines and the behavior of pulleys. For instance, while a block of any shape will slide down a frictionless decline at the same rate, rolling objects may descend at different rates, depending on their moments of inertia. A hoop will descend more slowly than a solid disk of equal mass and radius because more of its mass is located far from the axis of rotation. However, for (more complicated) problems in which the axis of rotation can change, the scalar treatment is inadequate, and the tensor treatment must be used (although shortcuts are possible in special situations). Examples requiring such a treatment include gyroscopes, tops, and even satellites, all objects whose alignment can change.

    The moment of inertia is also called the mass moment of inertia (especially by mechanical engineers) to avoid confusion with the second moment of area, which is sometimes called the area moment of inertia (especially by structural engineers). The easiest way to differentiate these quantities is through their units (kg·m² as opposed to m4). In addition, moment of inertia should not be confused with polar moment of inertia (more specifically, polar moment of inertia of area), which is a measure of an object's ability to resist torsion (twisting) only, although, mathematically, they are similar: if the solid for which the moment of inertia is being calculated has uniform thickness in the direction of the rotating axis, and also has uniform mass density, the difference between the two types of moments of inertia is a factor of mass per unit area.
     
  9. SMOKEIT

    SMOKEIT Well-Known Member

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    Chipmaker-----Yaa I was just going to say that....SMOKIT
     
  10. K-80BUD

    K-80BUD TS Member

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    Chipmaker, An excellent explanation. Thank you for taking the time to post it. Bud Wood
     
  11. sliverbulletexpress

    sliverbulletexpress TS Member

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    You can adapt to about anything and many of us starting out shooting that way. Then there is the way you think you should shoot whether it is really correct or not. And then there is the new and shiny syndrome where just about anything new and shiny works better than the old stuff.

    The hardest thing is to find out what YOU really need.
     
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