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SHOCKING experience with Automate...

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by blkcloud, Apr 24, 2010.

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  1. blkcloud

    blkcloud Active Member

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    I have let my loading duties slack here lately, so since it was a wet rainy day outside I figured it would catch up.. after about 150 rounds I was in the process of loading another shell when all of a sudden I got the hell knocked out of my right hand and arm.. about 5-6 seconds later a giant clap of thunder went off like a cannon outside.. I know what happened..I got shocked but why I did I have no idea.. It had to have something to do with the lightning strike.. My house is only 4-5 years old and I know its wired correctly or it wouldnt have passed inspection... Any Ideas? thanks!
     
  2. Chichay

    Chichay TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    If you heard the thunder 5-6 seconds later, the lightning strike was over a mile away; or, the thunder clap you heard had nothing to do with the lightning strike you "felt". Chichay
     
  3. moserag

    moserag Member

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    My advice is to make sure your house's ground wire hasn't broken. That can cause serious problems.
    Dave Moser
     
  4. KRE

    KRE TS Member

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    Glad you all right.

    Wiring to code has nothing to do with lighting protection. I've seen the best systems ever installed for lighting protection, fail the task. That said if your home is hit again within the next year or so, I'd have the system checked. Wires can be ran in such a way in attics that scream hit me. The home next to us in Florida was hit 3 times within 3 years. The wiring was to code but the folks installing the system went over board with ground rods in the wrong pattern and set up a ground loop.

    By the way after a strike it's best to check yours an the power companys grounding rods, as if it was bad enough the sand around the rods will be turned to glass. I can't tell you how many rods I've seen over the years from this that went undetected and lead to many a Ins claim. Chem rods are the best there is for grounding but not cheap.
     
  5. waverider

    waverider Well-Known Member

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    If you got the shock as you were reaching for the loader, there may have been a lot of static electricity in the air around you and your arm created the path to ground through your loader.

    Jason
     
  6. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    The lightning strike might have hit (or got into) the electrical wires feeding your home a couple of miles from you and back feed into your home, then into your loader. That would happen as soon as the strike, before you could hear it. That's why you put serge protectors on electronic devices in your homes, for lightning and because of power up's and down's at the power plants as well. I live in the lightning capital of the US and we take it very serious around here. Grounding wires (Lightning rods) are great to let the charge go into the ground quickly, but the electric charge can still take out some of your plugged in devices if your house is hit. Glad your not hurt. Break-em all. Jeff
     
  7. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Now do y'all see why they say..... never shower during a storm?
     
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