1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

SCALES What are the basic good scales?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by ljutic73, May 16, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. ljutic73

    ljutic73 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    5,401
    Location:
    Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
    I don't know how good Dillon's scale is but someone reading this probably knows and will weigh in with an opinion.
     
  2. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,685
    Location:
    Redding, California
    PACT is the number 1 scale on the market as far as I'm concerned. You can buy one direct from PACT for $129.99 at www.pact.com....Dan Thome (Trap)
     
  3. AdamsRibs

    AdamsRibs TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    124
    The 505 is a good scale, perfectly good enough for shotgun
    reloading. (IMHO) I use one all the time for both shotgun
    and metallic reloading and am very happy with it. The Digital
    scales are simpler to use but the 505 will do everything you
    might want for practical reloading.

    AdamsRibs
     
  4. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    15,639
    Location:
    Green Bay Wisconsin
    I have a slightly upscale version of the 505 for twenty years.

    You just adjust the leg till the pointer centers with the beam weights set at 0. No calibration weights needed.

    Ohaus makes them for RCBS, I believe. Mine is an Ohaus. Maybe they have a website.

    HM
     
  5. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,594
    Mac, the 505 can be your last scale ever considered or bought. The key is that it needs to be re-calibrated any time you move it due to any inconsistencies in your work area where it may sit or be moved upon. You can use any known weight to get yourself going, even buying a box of inexpensive rifle bullets and weighing several to ensure they are, in fact, the 130 or 150 grains that's printed on the box. They'll be close enough. Once you have it set up in a spot, try to keep it there or you'll have to re-calibrate when you set it up again as I described. Edit: Halfmile's right, when I say it could need re-calibrating upon any movement, the 505 would need to be zeroed if it gets moved. However, I would still want to be certain any time that where it's set up the 505 was real close to a known bullet or a test dime, or whatever you might have for that purpose.

    However, the digital scales are so much easier to use that I can't help but recommend them. You must pay the $100 to $175 necessary to get one designed for our use and once they are calibrated for your spot on earth, it would be a rare need to ever have to re-calibrate. The Dillon scale is likely made by Pact or some other outfit but I have one that's lasted religiously for some 15 or more years. The Pact that Dan mentions is also a perfectly good scale. You want one that will work with batteries but should have a 110 plug-in so you're not relying on batteries all the time. The one hang up with them is that you must be really careful about any breeze in the room where you're weighing because the slightest air movement will get the scale oscillating and never giving an accurate read. You must close the windows and doors and even approach the scale slowly until you get used to how sensitive it is. I don't know what your cheap electronic is but I'd probably recommend the 505 for now and have that digital/electronic on the wish list.....breakemall.....Bob Dodd
     
  6. famill00

    famill00 TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    610
    Use the money you would spend on an electronic scale and buy other components. I work in an analytical laboratory, thus have access to very accurate digital scales. I took a guy's 505 to work with me one day and compared its accuracy to an analytical balance. The 505 was deadly accurate so long as you zeroed it before using it. I highly reccomend the 505 even though I use a Lyman digital. Its your choice if you want to spend the money for a digital, but honestly the 505 is more accurate than neccesary for shotgun reloading. Just my $.02

    Forrest
     
  7. Mac V

    Mac V Guest

    Stick with the 5-0-5...any scale that can indicate a 4-flake change in an 18-grain powder drop is more than adequate for shotshell use.

    Mike
     
  8. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    6,482
    The 505 will be all you need unless you want to weigh loaded shells. 492 grains is as heavy as you need.
     
  9. JoeS

    JoeS TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7
    These guys are right, I bought the 505 years ago and it is a top quality scale. I wouldn't trade it for any electronic scale out there. Keep it 0'd in and it will work forever.....plus it never needs batteries. I read a comparison of electronic vs the manual sclaes a few years ago and the manual came out much more accurate and consistant. The electronic ones can get out of whack easier and give false readings. I'm sure some are better than others, but I trust the 505. I have a set of cablibration weights and mine is dead on. As with any scale handle it delicately and don't bump it around. Also, keep a dust cover on it when not in use. This will keep it clean and working smooth. I use a clear Rubbermaid type container which fits neatly over it. You can't go wrong. Joe
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.