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SAFE LIVE PRIMER DE-PRIMING

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by gdbabin, Aug 31, 2010.

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  1. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

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    The "non-fired shells with dented primers" thread caused me to think about something that I've wondered about but never resolved.


    What is the safe, recommended way to de-prime a live (or "dented") primer from shot shell and brass.


    The warnings tell you to NEVER use the loader de-priming station. Some of my older more experienced friends tell me there's no problem using the priming station, but perhaps they've only been lucky.


    I have a collection of rejects with live primers installed. What is the correct way? I don't like the idea of throwing them in the trash.



    Guy Babin
     
  2. Rich219

    Rich219 Active Member

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    1. Put the shell in the press and very slowly deprime. Wear eye and hearing protection.


    2. Put shell in gun and fire.
     
  3. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    I follow "Rich219's" method after using Gary's Unloader to remove the inners from my screw-ups. I always wear eye protection while loading so i just remove them carefully. I've never had any issues but i guess what can happen could happen. I think more than anything, it would scare the crap out of you.---Matt
     
  4. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    I cut my shells in the middle of the wad in my bandsaw and pull out the base wad salvage the powder, put the base in the deprime station - deprime it, save thye primer, pull out the top of the wad and save the shot,

    Thats what I do.

    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  5. OregonDon

    OregonDon TS Member

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    Gary - Your suggestion for salvaging components is the best I've seen. Thanks, Don
     
  6. clayshooter555

    clayshooter555 TS Member

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    You can salvage everything if you want. Pry open the crimp...pour out the shot. Slip in needle nose pliers...pull the wad out. SLOWLY deprime...save primer.
     
  7. Ljutic111

    Ljutic111 TS Member

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    For 30 years I have been using a knife to cut off the crimp and dropping the lead in a container , then with a needle nose pliers I remove the wad and dump the powder in another container . I then deprime the hull with a sinle station reloader and re-use all the good primers without an incident all this time .
     
  8. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Some of you guys REALLY need to give Gary's Unloader a shot. From the 1st time i used mine i was sold. I used to use a knife but the Unloader makes it safer and faster and if you want, everything is reuseable but the hull. Perfect cut in the perfect spot everytime. You spend $100's of dollars on a loader and accessories but won't spend $30 on a necessity. It makes dismantling screwups actually fun. Oh well, just be careful however you choose to do it.----Matt
     
  9. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

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    Gary's unloader is awesome--I love mine. If only it would de-prime too... Just kidding of course.



    It sounds like careful use of the de-priming station is ok if proper care and safety equipment are employed.



    Guy
     
  10. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    I use a hull cutter to salvage components and Lee Load-All II to deprime the base.

    My hull cutter is made of anodized aluminum and works with a lot less effort than Gary Bulley's wooden ones; there's a lot less friction between the hull and the hull cutter and that makes a big difference if you have more than a couple hulls to do.

    I modified one of Garry's cutters by epoxying some very thin sheet tin to the arm where the hulls makes contact and the inside of the hole that the hull goes into. (Tried aluminum HVAC tape first; it worked well but wasn't as durable or permanent.) The tin in the hole need only be applied to the bottom half of the hole (where the hull makes contact). Really reduces the wear on the fingers required to turn hull after hull after hull...

    MK
     
  11. JTEA

    JTEA Member

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    I got a cutter for plastic pipe at the hardware store. Fast, easy, safe and inexpensive. Lock it in and spin the hull over a plastic container, drop the shot. Pull the wad and dump the powder in another plastic container.

    JT
     
  12. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    Also a fan of the Unloader. It took a while to cut open 300+ that had accumulated over the 5 years I have been reloading shot shells. It is crappy payback unless you produce a lot of poor shells a year. But it is a very good tool.

    I thought about salvaging the primers. Figured the savings of less than $10 wasn't worth it. If you must, use a full face shield or set up a Plexiglas "barricade" between you and the shell.

    Don Verna
     
  13. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

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    Fred,


    Thank you. The time cost of doing it the correct way, or even the wrong way, seems to make this a wasteful endeavor.


    Remaining, what do you recommend doing with a non-reclaimed primer Fred?



    Guy
     
  14. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    Guy I use mt dismantle(I have one I have had for years called the KIRDOC)then on my PW I set the base of the shell on top of the die in the depriming station and gently deprime.

    The base of the hull and discard the base the dented primer drops into the primer catcher for what ever my wishes are, discard or save.

    I save the one that come out of the rare screw up I have as they aren't dented. Actually very easy and I have never had a problem even though it isn't recommended.

    Bob Lawless
     
  15. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Being the component whore that I am, I just have to recover the primers from those occaisional shells that don't make it past inspection. I just run a cut open shell through my sizer/deprimer and collect the primer out of the tray.

    No I can't say it is completely wise or safe and even though I haven't set one off doing this, I have set off a primer in a MEC 650 by crushing it. If you do decide to decap live primers, wear good eye protection.

    If you just want to kill the primer, fire it in a gun or dump it in a burn barrel. (this is particularly entertaining)
     
  16. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Fred,

    After you let the primer sit for a couple of days, I suggest you put it in a gun and try to fire it. I think you will find that it will still go bang. Modern primers are sealed with a non oil soluble coating over the flash hole. HMB
     
  17. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    ...and for some reason I feel safer depriming a hull in a Lee Load-All than I do poking at the flash hole cover of a live primer with a pointy object trying to breach it so I can get oil inside!

    MK
     
  18. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    The Unloader is clearly the right tool for cutting shells for reuse of the components. I have been punching out live primers for many years with an old MEC resizer/deprimer. Might not be safe, but I do it. If a primer would happen to go off all I can see happening it the handle would be pushed up a little, a little gas would escape down, and I would have to come up with a little story to tell my wife. The shell is encased in the resizing die and that should prevent any real problem.

    Pat Ireland
     
  19. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    I've re-used boo-boo loaded primers since I began reloading in the early 60s and have never had one to go off. Certainly not saying it can't happen but it's never happened to one I've deprimed. For safety, I do use another MEC for such chores though.

    Any of you that deprime them ever have one go off during the process? If you've had one, it will be the first I've heard of! I did have one go off because of a piece of shot landed on the MEC insertion station though.

    Hap
     
  20. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    I have no faith in the primers being "deactivated" using oil. I have "deprimed" live primers in a single stage mec or sizing tool for many years. I have NEVER had one go off. If they were a "Dud", I would empty the hull of other components and try to set it off in a shotgun. If it didn't fire, then it gets deprimed and saved for a campfire. :)

    I use proper eye protection when decapping live primers. I have some heavy clothing and face, hand, and arm protection used for industrial applications. Similar to the stuff I use when casting bullets. I just don't have that many to take apart that I would make a big production over it.

    Had a friend once that had a unique process for "unloading" hulls. It had something to do with a hunk of firewood, a splitting maul, and hitting the shell just right so the rpimer would push out a little bit so you could get them out with a pair of diagonal cutters. Somehow I never had the need to try duplication the process.

    I use a knife or a box cutter to sever the tube and remove the components from there. I usually cut the crimp off and save the shot, wad, and powder, while having the option of removing the primer as well. Maybe one day I'll buy or make an "unloader". Until I exceed the half dozen or so rejects every month or two, I'll just keep doing what I have for almost 50 years.
     
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