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Safe amount of shells/reloading materials.

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by bjk1972, Feb 6, 2012.

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  1. bjk1972

    bjk1972 Member

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    Livning in NE Ohio and with three kids under ten,I'm reluctant to store any loaded shells or reloading material in the garage. Now that I'm starting to shoot more and hopefully get a few registered shoots in this year,I'm trying to stay ahead of the game will the reloads.After three flats I kinda started thinking about how much live ammunition I want in the house.My reloading/gun room is a bedroom in my basement that I put a front door type lock on and my guns are all secure in a heavy browning safe.Very child proof.I typically dont have more than 8lbs of powder or 5k primers at any given time under my bench.My main safety concern is if a house fire broke out(my wife's co-worker's house just burnt to the ground). I would hate to think of a firefighter getting hurt or refusing to go in the house because of a potential hazard.Am I freaked out because of our freinds recent fire or do I have a legite point? Brad
     
  2. Russ-in-Pa

    Russ-in-Pa Well-Known Member

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    I usually have 3 flats in my car.

    It sounds like you have taken sensible precautions about your firearm and ammo storage already.

    Most people on this site have much more loaded ammo in their houses, and in talking to several firefighters at work, ammunition in a fire is not a major concern. It takes an enclosed vessel to generate any kind of velocity (either a barrel/chamber in a gun, or an strong enclosure like a gun safe).

    Do not store ammunition in your gun safe.
     
  3. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    Primers are the only real danger as they will create a problem when they go off.

    Loaded ammo is not dangerous and can be stored in any quantity.

    You are limited to 10,000 primers and 50 lbs of primers by the National Fire Safety Code which most municipalities adopt. The powder must be in a wooden crate that will "vent" the gases.

    Don Verna
     
  4. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    I'm NOT going to suggest you change the way you're raising your kids, but in my home, we have no secrets. I have brought the grandchildren to the range since they were 6 and 4... they could care less about touching shotguns and boxes of shells because they are always around them...

    Today the kids are 11 and 9 and have been watching and helping me reload for 2 years... originally they sat at the bench and set up the hulls and wads like little armies... now they set the hulls and drop-in the wads. They know nothing leaves the house and they can help anytime they want... my grandson just started breaking his own targets.

    If they were tall and strong enough, I'd let them pull the handle under my supervision...

    How much you keep is your business... but I suppose one round is enough to cause some trouble...

    Respectfully offered,

    Jay
     
  5. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Ditto what Jay said. Good post.
     
  6. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    Spitter good for you.

    EDU the kids. Teach the kids. If the kids ask a question answer the question till they are happy with the answer.

    As for you. STOP BEING A WET HEN WORRYING ABOUT NOTHING. The powder your using and the primers are not to worried about. Take some powder and put it in a pan and use a stick if your that scared and light it. You will see a burn and thats it. Take the same amount and do the same with blackpowder and you will see a much diff FLASH. Blackpowder you do have to worry about but todays smokeless you do not. It will not go BOOM unless in the gun. The same with the shells. Google it if you want. Your acting like a scared antigun person who is going to say what they need to to get their way.
     
  7. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    Firemans turn out coats will easily stop a popping primer. This is documented in a FM test experiment and has been written about and posted in training films. Powder will not explode unless it is contained in something strong enough to allow it to build pressure. A certified powder magazine (a gun powder cabinet) has panels or a lid that will pop loose with low pressure. The powder WILL flare a hot fire.

    I properly store my powder in a(home made) 1 inch pine wood cabinet and store my primers in US GI Surplus ammo cans. A couple of kegs and 15,000 or so primers do not worry me.
     
  8. bjk1972

    bjk1972 Member

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    I have no secrets in my home. My kids even help me reload from time to time and want to shoot as well.I do my part to educate them too. I assure you I'm not an anti-gunner nor a wet hen. I was told once that there was no such thing as a stupid question, I guess I wrong! Maybe its the other kids that play in my basement that concern me.I have burt off old powder before and I would say it was a pretty good accelerant come a house fire.
     
  9. 2500 HD

    2500 HD Active Member

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    Keep that corner cool boys!!!!!
     
  10. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    bjk1972,

    I don't think it was a stupid question at all. I don't see any answers that should have given you that impression either. Nothing wrong with being safe and making sure you are following safe practices for yourself and your family. I think that is what you had in mind.
     
  11. mike2010

    mike2010 TS Member

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    keep as muck as your pocket can stand for tomorrow the price will be higher
     
  12. Ron(Oh)

    Ron(Oh) TS Member

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    Several years ago my jeep burnt with 4 boxes of shells in it.
    The fireman told me they were only dangerous within about 3-4' away
     
  13. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    There is a quirk in the regs here - NFPA and DOT apply to commercial enterprises (think trucking firms, businesses selling powder, primers, etc.), but they do not technically apply to a private residence or private citizen, so while your local fire dept. might like you to adhere I have found no law which requires an individual to do so.

    If you know of one please be so kind as to inform us all.

    Food for thought.
     
  14. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Brad - you have taken the proper measures to keep hazardous materials out of kids hands and you obviously realize its not just your kids you need to be thinking about. I'll give you kuddos for taking this seriously.

    As far as safe storage, the locked room in your basement is very good and if you have a fire that is hot enough to cook off the materials located down there then there won't be anything left of the house anyway and a few pops and fizzles from the loading room won't make any difference.

    One consideration about the basement loacation is the likely humidity problem which may effect primers and powder over time. How about if you build a nice chest and install a dehumidifier in it and keep your ammo and volitile components in that.

    The max quantity is really up to you but really 20 to 30 flats of loaded ammo and two kegs of powder plus two sleeves of primers should keep you covered pretty well while at the same time it is a manageable inventory that you can turn over at least once per year.
     
  15. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    wolfram,

    Not all basements have humidity problems. My basement is dry as a bone and has never had a lick of mositure. We have carpet and hardwood floors down there. I actually add some humidity so as to cut down on the static build up in my loading room. Just say'n..............
     
  16. oldgahchamp

    oldgahchamp Active Member

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    BJK, Our local Volunteer Fire Dept sends out a questionaire for me to list hazards and areas of concern every year at the same time they solicit donations. I list the areas of the house that have loaded ammunition and powder as well as hazards in out-buildings, such as gasoline cans, prest-o-lite tanks, etc. Your fire dept might appreciate this information from you. Larry Evans
     
  17. Blueraven81

    Blueraven81 TS Member

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    I'll chime here due to I have/had a similar situation although my kids are a bit older now and shoot trap on the High School Trap Team, but they've been shooting since they were on the Jr. High Team.

    When my Boys first got into trap shooting I had "gun" and "reloading" safety concerns of my own. I started out with a "gun" room with a small safe. As my gun collection began to grow, so did my safe.

    Only my Wife and I had the combination to the safe until my Son's got to the age where-as they were driving themselves to trap practice.

    Then I gave my Sons the combination to the safe only because they need to get their trap guns out after school to go to practice and sometimes my Wife and I are not home. Of course they are older now. However the "gun" room is also my office and other than getting their guns out for practice, they have no reason to be in the "gun" room. Once High School trap season is over, I change the combination to the safe that only I know just as a precaution. This is not to say I don't trust my Boys, but why not take precautions if there's no reason to not do so.

    As for reloading supplies and ammo safety, I don't worry about my Boys messing with it, because there's no need to do so and they've never given me a reason to think they would mess with it. I keep at times approximately 2000 loaded shells and reloading supplies for 2000 more. I keep all the loaded shells, powder, and primers in a fire proof safe along with my guns. My safe is obviously a gun safe and in the even of a fire, any reasonable person would identify the safe as a gun safe. However being a fire proof safe, the risk is minimal.

    So if you haven't already, spend the money and buy a fire proof gun safe.

    Remember a gun or for that matter reloading supplies are only as dangerous as the person pulling the trigger or handling the supplies. Educate your kids in gun safety and what reloading supplies are and what they can do if handled incorrectly.

    As for Fireman's safety, they are trained in this matter, just make sure you use as many precautions as reasonably possible.
     
  18. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I received a nasty-gram - a nice one but a nasty-gram none the less - from a reader taking me to task for having too much powder on hand as shown in a photo of my loading bench that was part of a recent article I wrote on building a bench. It seems that insurance companies can deny a fire claim if it can be established that more than a certain amount of powder and such was present in a home at the time of the fire. I think he is right but fortunately, I load a lot of handgun and rifle ammo, so very few of the containers of powder are full at any time.

    Something to think about, I guess.

    Ed
     
  19. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Storing primers and powder in your safe is not a very good idea. HMB
     
  20. Blueraven81

    Blueraven81 TS Member

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    hmb, educate me; why storing powder and primers in a safe is not a good idea.
    I'm not questioning your comment, just looking for clarification.

    thanks,
     
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