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S&W M&P .40 No Safety

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Dave P, Apr 9, 2013.

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  1. Dave P

    Dave P TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I just recently bought one of the above. I didn't realize that it had no safety until I read the maual. The seller offered not much help and I can't seem to get to S&W to find out if one is available as an after market product and will they install it. I can't for the life of me believe that anyone, particularly someone like S&W not putting a safety on routinely-polce, military or otherwise. Comments please.
     
  2. SBray

    SBray Active Member

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    Dave,

    On the site listed above, the safety appears to have been added to later models at a higher price. One writer mentioned that because of the construction of the handgun, a manual safety is redundant.

    Many handguns are designed so as not to need the thumb safety.

    Steve
     
  3. NMULTRARUNNER55

    NMULTRARUNNER55 Member

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    The operator is supposed to be the safety.

    Steve Nunley

    Albuquerque, NM
     
  4. V10

    V10 Well-Known Member

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    There is a safety on all M&P pistols.

    The trigger is hinged so that only the act of "pulling" the trigger engages the trigger bar.

    They can have a manual thumb safety for redundancy, but it's not really necessary.
     
  5. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    ".....for the life of me believe that anyone, particularly someone like S&W not putting a safety on routinely-polce, military or otherwise. Comments please."


    Uhhhh, you ever hear of a Glock? Safety is in the trigger as V10 above pointed out.

    The Glock was the go-to handgun of just about every police force at one time or another.
     
  6. OldGoat

    OldGoat Well-Known Member

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    I called Smith & Wesson to inquire if I could send in an M&P 45 (before I bought one) to have a manual safety installed. The reply was "not really"...adding that the frame configuration of the non-manual safety model is different and the whole frame/receiver would have to be replaced. The follow-up comment was that a manual safety is not necessary for the reasons cited in the threads above. So I gave up looking. I like the idea of having this safety feature. Best Regards, Ed
     
  7. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    Dear Goat

    You will do fine. I doubt if you run around with your finger on the trigger.

    This type of arm is preferred these days. Just like a revolver. Don't want it to shoot? Keep your finger out of the trigger guard.

    I would not carry a sidearm with a manual safety.
     
  8. cpd544

    cpd544 Member

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    If your a police officer the last thing you want is a handgun gun with a safety on it, the extra time it would take you to take it off safety could get you killed. As stated above the most widely used pistol in law enforcement is a Glock and it has a trigger safety just like the S&W you have.
     
  9. MDMike

    MDMike Well-Known Member

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    The "agency" I work for issues this same pistol. I had concerns for safety as well and asked a friend who worked for another agency and carried a simular pistol if he would carry his with an empty chamber to enhance safety. "Under no circumstance" was his answer. We were trained to keep our fingers out of the trigger guard and off the trigger until it was necessary to shoot. We have yet to have an "unintentional discharge" (Knock on wood)in our agency. Now while not on duty I carry a Beretta PX4 Storm in 45 ACP. Before that I carried (and sometimes still do) a 1911A1. I was once asked why I carried a 45. My reply was "Because no one makes a 46". While I find the 40 S&W a good round, I want everything I can get on my side if I have to pull that thing and use it. I've been in a situation before when I had to pull my weapon and use it and I don't care to be in another one. The pistol needs to come out of the holster ready to use. Nothing is textbook and any edge you have will be appriciated when everything goes South.
     
  10. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Dave P, safeties fall into two categories - active and passive.

    Modern double action revolvers generally have passive safeties. They have an internal safety to make sure the firing pin cannot strike the primer UNLESS the trigger has been pulled. (S&W now has a key lock on their revolvers, but that is a storage safety.) These guns do not need an active safety. If you do not want them to go off, don't pull the trigger, or don't cock the hammer. The double action pull is usually pretty heavy.

    Pistols that are single action rely on one or more active safeties to keep the light trigger pull from accidentally firing the gun. You manually (actively) apply the safety when the hammer is cocked. The 1911 has an external passive grip safety as well. Series 80 or later 1911s also have an internal passive safety in the form of a firing pin block.

    Many double action pistols operate so similarly to double action revolvers that they do not have an active safety. Many have only a decocker. The SIG/Sauer P220 or P226 are examples of this.

    There are some double action pistols that have combination safety/decockers. The Walther P-38 is an example.

    Some pistols are "half-cockers", which is to say that a striker or firing pin rests at half-cock, and when the trigger is pulled, it pulls the striker/firing pin is pulled to full cock and is released, firing the gun. To make sure the striker/firing pin is not released, the gun has a passive safety on the trigger. The Glock and the S&W Sigma like yours are examples of that.

    My personal opinion on the Glock and the S&W copies that use a trigger safety is that it's like writing the combination to your safe on the vault door. In my opinion these are the worst types of safeties because they present no challenge at all to children, plus they are susceptible to foreign objects, particularly when pocket carried or carried in a holster that does not properly cover the trigger on both sides. Carried in a proper holster, they're fine.

    If you do not like the safety on your gun, don't live with it. Take it back and work with the dealer to get something you prefer. If he's a reputable dealer he will understand and you may not have much of a ding for loss on it if you have not shot it.
     
  11. oz

    oz Active Member

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    springfield XDs has a trigger safety AND a grip safety AND is a .45
     
  12. NJCOP

    NJCOP TS Member

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    I'm a cop. I carry that gun off duty. It doesn't require a thumb safety. I guess it's a preference. 1 of the 10 firearms commandments: Keep your off the trigger until your ready to fire basically means the bet safety you have is betweeen your ears.
     
  13. SBray

    SBray Active Member

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    cpd544,

    I would say the exception would be the 1911 that is meant to be carried in a holster with a buttoned leather strap in front of and across the cocked hammer, with the thumb safety on.

    Your range training teaches you to disengage the thumb safety when removing the gun from the holster, yet keeping your finger outside the trigger guard until you are ready to shoot!

    Steve
     
  14. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    As Brian above pointed out, a holster that covers the trigger on both sides can provide that extra piece of mind.


    I prefer this Blackhawk holster for my Glocks.
    grntitan_2009_250355.jpg
     
  15. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    I'm a 1911 guy and also carry a Browning HP, so the thumb safety is second nature to me. I ordered my M&P with a thumb safety to keep it all the same.
     
  16. dmbrassy

    dmbrassy Member

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    Know what your buying before you buy it...... Do a little research!!! I shoot Glocks no need for a safety!!!
     
  17. Big Al 29

    Big Al 29 TS Member

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    M&P, Glock are DAO, why would you need another safety other than the trigger?

    When you get jumped and the adrenaline is pumping all you are going to do is pull and press the trigger. If you forget to flip the safety you are toast.

    Same goes with not keeping one in the pipe. If you carry without one in the pipe you shouldn't be carrying a striker fired pistol.

    You can pull that slide all you want at the range and in your bedroom in a controlled condition. When its for real and you are in a struggle you ain't going to pull that slide you are going to press the trigger and the last thing you hear is "Click".

    Its a "revolver", it has a long pull, most are 6 pounds plus the trigger has to be pulled through and pulled correctly or it won't go off.

    PM me, I'll buy it right now, give me a price and I will take it. It will go well with my M&P FS 9, and my M&P compact 9.

    Take a course, know what you buy, its not TV where they pull the slide every five seconds.

    I can't believe anyone would buy a gun without knowing EXACTLY what they were buying.
     
  18. 9point3

    9point3 Well-Known Member

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    SBray, where did you get this idea?

    "I would say the exception would be the 1911 that is meant to be carried in a holster with a buttoned leather strap in front of and across the cocked hammer, with the thumb safety on."

    The most common holster ever made for the 1911 did not do this.
     
  19. SBray

    SBray Active Member

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    9point3,

    I think one of the holsters was made by Bianchi, but here is a web page with images of several holsters that have that feature:

    http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=A0oGdV83NmdRGgoAb9FXNyoA?p=bianchi+holster+colt+1911&fr=yfp-t-900&fr2=piv-web

    The pictures just above and below "Page 2" are like the ones I am familiar with. I don't think it would be such a good idea to not have a round in the chamber and ready to fire. A split second delay could cost you dearly!

    Steve
     
  20. Dave P

    Dave P TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Despite some of your arguments about no safeties I still feel all semiautos should have safeties. Those of you who are cops etc. who don't want safeties just leave them off. Do shooters, cops and other lawenforcement officers who like revolvers instead of semi's walk around with the hammer fully cocked?
     
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