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Rotator Cuff

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by michael101, Mar 4, 2011.

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  1. michael101

    michael101 TS Member

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    Can the shotgun sports possibly cause a torn rotator cuff, my Dr. thinks so and my non shooting friends all ask if thats what caused it. My surgery is next Tuesday and if shooting trap is the cause, as soon as i am over it I'll try to tear it again.
     
  2. hunter44

    hunter44 Well-Known Member

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    I just had rotator cuff surgery & I sure don't think that shooting had anything whatsoever to do with the injury.........the recoil is not even on the shoulder.
    If anything lifting a very heavy gun with one arm would cause more strain on the cuff than recoil.

    Does your doctor think that recoil caused your injury?
     
  3. michael101

    michael101 TS Member

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    He just said it could have caused the problem, I did notice lifting the gun before shooting did hurt.
     
  4. Beretta687EELL

    Beretta687EELL Well-Known Member

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    If it is your fore-end arm then it might aggravate the injury. Likely a specific overhead event tore the cuff. Try to curtail any overhead activity (keep your elbows below shoulder height).

    Your surgery and therapy will be very painful. It took me 11 years to get over it enough to have the second one done.

    DO YOUR THERAPY AS INSTRUCTED ... EXACTLY, NO MORE NO LESS!!!!

    Good luck with your surgery. Bill Malcolm
     
  5. hunter44

    hunter44 Well-Known Member

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    Good luck with your surgery & recovery, I can certainly relate to you.
     
  6. PBS24

    PBS24 TS Member

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    I have had both of mine done. The last one was seven weeks ago. I plan to be shooting sometime in the next two weeks or so. The first one was my left shoulder. I'm a right handed shooter. I waited two months to shoot with that one. The right shoulder that I recently had done may take a couple of weeks longer. The first one was cut open and was more painful than the last one that was scoped. The scoped one has been much easier and less painful. Shooting and recoil had nothing to do with either of them getting worn out. Bone spurs, forty years of baseball and softball and twenty years in the Army combined to wear them out. I think the doctors and non-shooters in general must think we shoot 3 inch mag loads out of field guns all day long. Recoil isn't the problem. Do your physical therapy without fail and you will be back shooting before summer is over. Brian
     
  7. Franktri

    Franktri Member

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    I have been reluctant to do any surgery with both my shoulders. I hear the rehab is brutal and long. However, since I place my gun into the pit of my arm and not on my shoulder, I am still able to shoot reasonably well with some soreness afterwards. To my knowledge, rotator cuff problems originate from throwing motions and/or heavy lifting and not from shooting. But who am I but an achy old man..
     
  8. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    By far the scoped surgeries are a cake walk compared to the full length incesion. Simply no comparison rehab wise. I highly doubt one could do the actual rotator cuff tear shooting trap. It would probably have had to be previously injured to cause any damage to it Trap shooting. If you ever have a shoulder injury bad enough that you can't lift your arm much higher than your waste, you'll go for the surgery no matter the pain afterwards. The arm can become useless pretty easily. Been there done that.

    Matt
     
  9. Anti-Fed

    Anti-Fed Member

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    I've had both sides worked on (no slice and dice, just 3 small incisions on each for the scope and tools). Yes, they were quite sore and the therapy wasn't fun, but I'd definitely do it again considering the results. I couldn't lift a half gallon of milk with the right one...do the rehab as instructed, stop lifting over your head, and don't look back.

    Jed
     
  10. twcpdc

    twcpdc Member

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    The rotator cuff muscles hold the shoulder in place like when you reach up and out. I sure you know when the movement hurts the worst. I cannot see how shooting could injure these muscles. I had surgery 12/1/10 two muscles tore completely away one damaged. The damaged was repaired one of complete tears was attached short of proper place on bone. I was shooting 12 weeks from surgery with no pain and There are a lot of movements that are still causing pain. I hope this helps you. Tom
     
  11. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    No way shooting / recoil caused the tear. tears are caused by excessive strain. Once repaired ( correctly) and you've completed rehab the problem will be gone unless you get crazy lifting or throwing chin-ups etc.
     
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