1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Rolla Heikes - Could any of us do this??

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Drew Hause, Mar 19, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    AZ but dreaming of KS
    Check the link above for profiles of Fred Gilbert, Rolla Heikes, "Billy" Crosby, William Heer, and J.A.R. Elliott


    Heikes was the first industry representatives in 1885, with the LeFever Gun Co. In 1895-96, he participated in 67 tournaments (despite having malaria in the summer of 1895) and was high gun in 60 using a Winchester 1893 slide-action. He defeated Fred Gilbert in 1896 at the 2nd "E.C." Cup "Champion Inanimate Target Shot of the World" in New York. Prior to using the Winchester, he shot a L.C. Smith.


    [​IMG]


    He defeated Charles Grimm on Dec. 6 1897 for the Cast Iron Medal using a Winchester 1897. He defeated Fred Gilbert for the "E. C." Cup at Chicago, August 13, 1898 with a score of 140 to 137 out of 150 targets, then successfully defended the "Cast Iron Medal" against Fred Gilbert at Eau Claire, Wis., in August and W.R. Elliston in Nashville in October.


    In 1899 he used a Remington Hammerless Double to defeat E.D. Fulford for the "E.C." Cup in January and won the Sportsmen's Association Championship Trophy in the trapshooting tournament held on the roof of the Madison Square Garden in March.

    [​IMG]


    He used a Parker at the 1900 GAH at Live Birds, then went back to his Remington to win the first Grand American at Clay Targets held at Interstate Park in New York City June 12-15, 1900.


    In November 1900, he was using a new single trigger Remington hammerless double. He was quite ill the second 1/2 of 1901 but recovered and started 1902 shooting the Remington double, then used a LC Smith at the Ohio State shoot and to take 3rd in the last GAH at Live Birds in Kansas City. He came back from Typhoid Fever in 1904 to take HOA at the Dominion of Canada Exhibition Shoot in Winnipeg again shooting a Remington.


    In 1905 he began shooting a Remington Autoloading Shotgun and was 2nd High Professional at the 1906 GAH.

    Courtesy of Chris Lien

    [​IMG]


    Some of the best ever in 1905 - the combined U.M.C. and DuPont/Winchester touring squads

    Left to right: Rolla Heikes, Jack Fanning, H.H. Stevens, Fred Gilbert, Tom Marshall, W.R. Crosby, W.H. Heer, Frank Butler


    [​IMG]
     
  2. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    AZ but dreaming of KS
    Heikes Hand Protector

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  3. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    AZ but dreaming of KS
    TRAPSHOOTING ADVICE FROM THE "DADDY OF THEM ALL"

    Dayton. O., March 7, 1898. Gun Editor Sporting Life


    There has been a number of books and articles written by eminent writers on the subject of trap shooting, and I feel that any remarks I might make will be very tame reading. Yet owing to many personal requests I have decided to write a brief article on inanimate bird shooting, giving a few points and suggestions to those interested in the sport, trusting it will be taken in good part as intended by the writer.

    I will start with the amateur who is aspiring to excel in the art of trap shooting. In the first place it is most essential to select a proper gun, and here lies a great difficulty. Many amateurs often make a serious mistake in buying a gun with stock too straight, too crooked, too long, or too short. No matter what one’s natural talent may be a gun without proper dimensions will greatly handicap the shooter. This question of the proper length and drop of a stock has created more gun cranks than any other parts of the business.

    The proper balance, weight length of stock, drop at butt, drop at comb, and thickness of stock at face have to be considered in selecting a gun, and any slight variation in any of the above parts will have a tendency to make more difficult work. In throwing the gun to face the comb should rest easily under the cheek bone and firmly against the cheek, giving the shooter a perfectly level sight over the rib from breech to muzzle, and also be absolutely in the centre of rib. The stock placed in this manner makes a gauge, and, no matter how quickly thrown to the face, gives a perfect line of sight on any object looked at.

    Having properly equipped yourself with a gun it is a very important matter to have if perfect load, and one that will give the most satisfactory results. This can be readily accomplished by testing some of the standard loads now on the market.

    One of the most important features in target shooting is to be quick and accurate. Targets should be broken within 25 yards from the trap, and even then they might occasionally go through some patterns. To shoot at one target slowly and another quickly is bad practice. Good "timing" is one of the secrets of good scores. I might illustrate the different styles of shooting, giving diagram of flights, etc. with proper places to hold to break each and every target thrown, but this would be of very little benefit, unless shooting my style, time, etc.

    To become an expert requires natural talent, patience and practice. I am not a believer that every amateur can be an expert, for all have not the eye, nerve and natural ability required. Yet I know many of ordinary skill who enjoy this outdoor sport, recreation and good fellowship among sportsmen equally as well as those quite proficient in the art. The question might be asked: What is required to become an expert? In my opinion a good constitution, a keen eye, a steady nerve, a natural talent and above all an even temper. How often we have seen some of our best shots balked and unnerved by broken birds in traps. This may happen two or three times in succession and the oftener it occurs the less chance you have of breaking the target unless you control your temper. To lose your temper loses many a target and the good shot who learns to keep a cool head usually lands in the "King Row" first.

    Another very important matter. When arriving on strange grounds, be very particular to watch the flight of every bird likely each and every trap will be different in speed and flight. Always watch the shooter ahead of you and it may often save yourself a miss by a little prudence and forethought. Grounds cut very little figure, although their location sometimes looks very unfavorable and you often hear the remark: "They are terribly hard grounds to shoot over." This I claim is only imagination. Concentrate your mind on the bird, and do not allow grounds or anything else to attract your attention until after you have fired. How many misses you can recall which were caused by having your attention taken to some other object about the time you were ready to shoot.

    I might go on and enumerate many more little points which are essential and have some significance, but space forbids. We all learn something at every tournament and every little point observed and brought into execution helps us on to perfection. Not wishing to take up any more of your valuable space, I extend best wishes to all and remain, yours very truly.

    ROLLA O. HEIKES
     
  4. chipking

    chipking TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,761
    After 112 years his advice is still spot on. A great read Thanks to the posters.

    --- Chip King ---
     
  5. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    AZ but dreaming of KS
    It is hardly necessary for us to go into detail regarding Rolla O. Heikes, of Dayton. O. He is the best-known trap shot in America today, and one of the most popular men that ever handled a shotgun at the traps. We doubt if there is a man in the world who has made the records at trap shooting that have been credited to the quiet blonde giant of Dayton. He has won more first averages and more general averages than any man known to the shooting world. He has for years been the acknowledged champion inanimate target shot of the world, and stood without a rival until within the last year or two. As a live bird
    shot he has won many honors, although not claiming to be the champion at this style of shooting. At the present time he holds the "Cast-Iron" Medal, a live bird championship trophy which he won from C. M. Grimm, and has since held it against two challengers, killing more than 90 out of 100 birds in each match. He has many records of 100 straight targets, and holds the world’s record for rapid shooting, breaking 100 targets in two minutes and forty eight seconds.

    He is a representative of the Winchester Repeating Arms Go. and uses their shotgun and factory-loaded ammunition for all of his shooting. He is also a representative of the E. C. and Schultze Powder Companies. His most notable record last year was made at the tournaments at Newburgh and Warwick, N. Y. where he broke 96.3 per cent, for 780 shots. He won 33 first averages during the season and nine first general averages, which led all other records.

    Click on the link above for an image from 1898
     
  6. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    AZ but dreaming of KS
    Rolla in 1908
     
  7. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    AZ but dreaming of KS
    In 1912 with Banks, Powers, Gilbert, Crosby, and Marshall


    Rolla "Pop" Heikes died at the age of 78 on Sept. 23, 1934. He was inducted into the Trapshooting Hall of Fame on August 19, 1969.
     
  8. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    14,697
    Location:
    NW Wisconsin
    I swear on my best oath of honor that he is retired to classification table at Eau Claire. I'm like Earl... I always shoot good there but they let jerry Demulling onto the grounds every time.

    Nice piece. Thanks for posting it.

    J
     
  9. Jim Porter

    Jim Porter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,313
    I bet he would rather shoot at Vandalia!
     
  10. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    AZ but dreaming of KS
    "I bet he would rather shoot at Vandalia!"

    I bet at the old NCR in Dayton! :)

    At the National Sportsmen's Association Tournament 3-11-1901, Heikes was part of the FIRST 125 at targets by a squad; with Parmelee, Fanning, Crosby and Gilbert.
     
  11. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    AZ but dreaming of KS
    Sept 20 1913
    “The latest addition to the ranks of the representatives of the United States Cartridge Company is the veteran Rolla O. Heikes, of Dayton, O., known the country over for his shooting feats and still a 95 per cent. shot. The Black Shell; which Heikes will sell is not unfamiliar to him, for when the Climax shell was loaded with black powder, a quarter of a century ago, he made some remarkably good scores. At the annual Keystone tournament, at Corry, Pa. in 1883, he won the diamond medal, emblematic of the American championship at targets, scoring 97, which resulted in a tie with Enoch Miller of New Jersey. In the shoot-off Heikes made a perfect score of 50 straight, thus winning the championship. At South Bend, Ind. in 1889, he won the silver trophy by making the highest straight run of 141 with five pair of doubles in the centre of run. At Corry, Pa. in 1890, Heikes made 100 straight with The Black Shells in the competition between the East and West teams, and during the same tournament scored two straight runs, one of 181 and one of 170, using the Climax shell loaded with black powder.”
     
  12. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    AZ but dreaming of KS
    Rolla used a Parker at the 1900 GAH at Live Birds, finished out of the money, and went back to his Remington, and won the Interstate Association’s First Annual GAH at Targets June 1900, then started 1901 with a new Remington single trigger hammerless gun. He was ill and unable to compete at the 1901 GAH, then used a Parker during the Anglo-American Competition in June 1901, then back to the Remington. He shot a LC Smith to take 3rd in the (last) GAH at Live Birds in Kansas City in April 1902.

    At the 1903 GAH in April it sounds like he didn't know what to shoot!

    "Rolla Heikes, the U. M. C. expert, was present. Rolla stuck to one kind of shell, but was not prejudiced on guns or powders. He fiddled around with three different guns, one Young gun and two old ones, besides changing powder to various brands and colors to suit his complexion. He changed his mind at opportune moments on the number he could break out of 20 and was only able to get a seat in the intermediate class. In the 16-yard sky rocket performances he "maimed and destroyed" .829 per cent, of the "birds" shot at. But at the rear posts his agility was the best of any of the sharpshooter's and he got a prize in all three handicap hurdles. His average from 22 and 23 yards was.876 per cent."

    After that he went back to his Remington CEO. While touring the south with the U.M.C. squad in 1904, Heikes acquired Typhoid fever and his son Horace, Malaria.

    He was using the new Remington Autoloading Shotgun in June, 1905. The gun was not listed in the Remington catalog until 1906.
     
  13. OLD ONE EYE

    OLD ONE EYE Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,249
    Location:
    Florida / Idaho
  14. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    AZ but dreaming of KS
    "The Art of Wing Shooting: A Practical Treatise on the Use of the Shotgun"
    William Bruce Leffingwell 1895


    On Christmas morning, in the year 1856, Rolla O. Heikes made his advent into the world. His genial smile and pleasing presence is welcome at every shoot. He stands without an equal as a target shot, and his shooting is marvelous. He began to use a shot-gun when it was necessary for him to rest it on a log. The entire length of this gun is fully six feet. He still owns it, and it is cherished by him with intense devotion.

    He first became known as an expert shot in 1878. His first public experience at the trap was at Brownsville, Neb., on July 4, 1878, he winning second place in the tournament. On July 1, 1880, he made his first 100 straight. He has recognized the fact that study and practice are essential to success. Mr. Heikes is also an expert pigeon-shot, and was recently placed at thirty-two yards in the great American handicap. Among some of the remarkable scores he has made, we have the following: Detroit, Mich., 125 straight; South Bend, Ind., 141 straight; Corry, Pa., 181 straight; Corry, Pa., 170 straight; Lexington, Ky., 114 straight; Chicago, 111., 117 straight; Saratoga, N. Y., 100 straight; Hamilton, Ont, 155 straight; breaking 468 blue rocks out of 500, shooting five different rules; and at Hamilton, Ont., he killed twenty live pigeons and broke 155 targets without a miss.
     
  15. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    AZ but dreaming of KS
    Image from 1908
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page

fred gilbert trap shooters guns