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Right Handers From Post 5

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by rhymeswithorange, Jun 24, 2009.

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  1. rhymeswithorange

    rhymeswithorange Member

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    Having trouble with hard rights from post 5, I'm a right handed two-eyed shooter. Seems like others here have the same problem, I was wondering why. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    It's a hard swing! I shoot lefty. Same problem on station one. Bulge.
     
  3. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    # 5 is not a problem for me, it forces me to keep my head on the stock where as I get a little forgetful on the easier straigh away. # 1 is my hardest and I am a right handed two eye shooter
     
  4. Jon Reitz

    Jon Reitz Well-Known Member

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    I'm also a right handed, two-eyed shooter and have more problems with this one than any other. For me it's because I don't see it become clear and whole. I shoot quickly (although I wish I didn't). I think I try to catch up with the bird too quickly and then stay with it all the way out of the house. Consequently, I end up: 1) moving the gun to the right in anticipation of a hard right, 2) chasing the streaking target, and 3) not being smooth by swinging through the bird.

    My belief is that I'm not trusting my eye(s) to allow it to pick up the bird, track it, and then smoothly swing the gun through it and break it. I end up trying to shoot them more like straightaway targets and usually end up behind them, especially if the trap is "quick". Help?
     
  5. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    I had (a sometimes still have) the same problem. A coach showed me that I was turning my shoulders a little to the right before my gun started to move. Even though the end of the barrel seemed to be at 4 o'clock to the target, the muzzle was actually pointed behind the target. I had been compensating by putting more visual lead into the target but that was not addressing the actual problem.

    Coach showed me that a hard right angle moves only about its own wide through the air in the time it takes the shot from a 2 3/4 DE load to reach it from 16 yards; if I was leading the target by more than that, I was either stopping the gun or moving my head on the stock. It turned out to be the latter. I couldn't feel the movement because there was always cheek pressure on the wood; it was just shifting to a different part of my cheek.

    Carol Lister
     
  6. chiefjon

    chiefjon Active Member

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    Paying attention to two points have helped me. I set up with my point of aim about 6" to the right of the trap house. I concentrate on keeping the gun low as I swing...I found I was twisting the gun up and over the target as I turned. I have tried to swing out in front of the target and find it almost impossible to go too far. Have a trap set to just throw hard right and stand on post 5 and shoot a box of shells...you will over come.

    JON
     
  7. jmas

    jmas TS Member

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    It is very easy to pull the comb slightly off the cheek when swinging to the right. Even though un-noticed by the shooter it can be enough to "LOSS"

    jmas
     
  8. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    Make sure your feet and body are aligned facing away and to the right of the trap house. You should be aligned, and a gun position, that a hard LEFT out of five is a straight away, this cuts the gun swing way down for a hard right. Don't know if I explained this right, google "foot position for trap". To many right handed shooters are standing on five facing the trap house, this causes way to much turn to the right, pulling the stock away from your face. Wayne
     
  9. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    Another thing to look for on hard rights.

    Make sure you aren't rolling your shoulders and shooting under the bird. Easy to do, hard to correct.

    Good Luck.

    Hauxfan!
     
  10. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    From 16 yards you hardly have to lead the righthander-from-five much at all. A foot or so is enough, a bit more won't hurt either. From 27 you need a good deal more, but still it's not enough to lose the connection between the bead and the bird.

    Lock the trap so the bird is just less than a straightaway from post one, go to five, and try out a variety of leads with a lot of shots; you will find out what works and thereafter when you get to five in the event, think "If it's a right-hander, I will have to put the gun right "there" in relation to the target; if it's less than that, just in front will be fine (from about any yardage.)"

    All of this is dependent on your determination to keep the gun moving when the shot goes off, which is absolutely _not_ getting the gun where it needs to be and then shooting. The shot has to go off when the gun gets there and is still in normal motion. This means, of course, that the "sight-picture" is not right when your brain sends the message to your trigger-finger, but rather your body knows, from experience, that it will end up apparently automatically go off when it "gets right." That's why I wrote above "a lot of shots;" the timing has to get built in to what is a chain of physical and neural events, at least one of which, the issuing of the command to pull the trigger, is largely unconscious.

    To me this means, in the end, that the task of breaking a target is mostly getting the gun where it belongs when it will go off, not getting it there and shooting.


    Neil
     
  11. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    I shoot right handed and with both eyes.

    To me, the most important factor in making hard right hand targets from position 5 (and hard lefts from position 1) is not to be surprised. Make sure that you see the target well and then swing aggressively into the target. I never could figure out leads, I just know when to shoot.

    If you let yourself get surprised, IMO, you lift your head to see the bird better and miss.

    As you get to the end of a round, you may be a little tired or are thinking about something other than the next target. This is exactly the hard rights and hard lefts just know when to appear.

    Ed Ward
     
  12. DENNISMASTROLIA1

    DENNISMASTROLIA1 Active Member

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    I have studied the GOOD shooters/the All Americans and observed that MOST of them shoot this target with the "horse shoe" move. That is a slight dip and then up again with the muzzle as to always approach this target from below the target.Ray Stafford,Kay and many more. I have even looked at their muzzles with binoculars!I have a friend at Danvers/Fish and Game that has not missed this target in 18 years--Really!!Former All American @ Minuteman also moves to this target as described above.Look closely and you will see them do this move.This also prevents the "loop" over to the target that you described. I may not be the best shooter but I can teach--It's in the blood.Red Auerbach wasn't the best basketball player but he sure could teach the game.Try it.Not many will give this "secret" away.Best of Luck.
     
  13. romie

    romie Active Member

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    check feet.check hold point and I have found that most important is my eye hold.the sooner I see the target the easier it is.I am 55 and evidently don't have quick eyes.I had to set the trap on hard right and find what workes for me
    Non expert
     
  14. rhymeswithorange

    rhymeswithorange Member

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    Thanks for your time, very helpful.
     
  15. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    From post three, the 50 yard stake is the middle of the target arc. The maximum angles are equal to the right and left of this stake. And, from post 5, or any other post, if you look at the 50 yard stake, hard right and left angles will be centered around that point. When you change posts, the target arc does not change. The only change is where you are looking.

    If you break targets at 30 yards, envision a 30 yard stake and position your body so you can move left and right with equal ease from that imaginary point. This makes shooting from post 5 the same as from post one. Most right handed shooters actually swing better to the left than to the right, so fudging a bit to the left is not bad.

    Pat Ireland
     
  16. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Heck, I have more trouble with hard lefts (target going straight way from you) at station 5.

    Lots of good suggestions.

    Low insertion point, a few inches above, and a little to the right of the top-right-front corner of the house. You don't want your gun blocking your view so you lose sight of the target if it goes hard right, so don't use a very high starting point.

    Soft focus above your bead, out in front of the house.

    Foot position, with toes both pointing to the right of the box (essentially your back is facing the guy at station 4.)

    Weight over, and pivot over your left foot (if your weight transfers to your right foot when you're moving to the target, you'll roll your shoulders.)

    Keep your head on the stock! Eyes on the rock!!

    Shoot in front of it and FOLLOW THROUGH!

    Follow through practice for me is finding a big piece of the target after I've broken it and staying on it until it hits the ground, or if I miss, staying on the target as though I am going to shoot at it again. Keeps you "in the gun."

    YMMV
     
  17. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    First off, it's been brought to my attention that Bulge has a hard time shooting from any station!!!! As for hard rights from 5, you might try this. Point your toes to the right, so your actually facing to the right of the trap field and the house from station 5. Turn at your hips back left, your hold point just below the right outer corner of the house. Your swing for a hard left will be minimal and on hard rights let your body recoil towards your feet it will help keep your cheek on the stock. I shoot two eyes and this position has worked for me.
     
  18. Big Jack

    Big Jack Well-Known Member

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    The entries above have covered almost every possible problem you can face. The overall truth will probably lead to your foot positioning and you body motion. Take advantage of positioning to start and "stay with the gun". Right hand shooters tend to push them off their face moving that way. Move from feet not just trying to "arm shoot" as most right hasnders try to do. Break that front knee just a bit and you'll find the swing much smoother to make. Continue to move your foot positioning to favor the right side. The left target will also seem to becomes easier since you will always be pulling the gun into your face without addittional effort. Next step, get a good coach if these suggestion don't seem to help.

    Big Jack
     
  19. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    You only have to move one part of one foot to make a swing to the right easier. Stand in a normal position and swing to the right. Then, without moving your heel, move the toe of only your right foot 1/2 inch to the right. Swing to the right again and you will feel a bid difference. You can test this while standing in front of your computer.

    Pat Ireland
     
  20. M R Ducks

    M R Ducks Member

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    Probably the best shot that ever lived was Rudy Etchen. Read his guidance on this shot, and apply it to any other presentation that gives you trouble.

    Rudy wrote he would swing and catch up to a target, then push through it and pull the trigger at the same time; he said to "wipe the target from the sky."

    This works well for me on ALL right hand targets from all posts (I shoot two eyes, right handed).

    It works from 16 to 27 yards to as far back as you care to try. Give it a good hard push through and pull (or release) your trigger - smoke. Give it a try. It will slow you down and make you wish for, not dread this target.

    Joe
     
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