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Rifle Target Shooters-Do you ream cartridge necks?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Sgt. Mike, Feb 23, 2009.

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  1. Sgt. Mike

    Sgt. Mike TS Member

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    For long range rifle target shooters. Do any of you ream the cartridge necks for uniformity? If so what brand of reamer do you use? Where do you get your information for the correct outside neck diameter? I'm looking at 5.56/.223 and .308. Thank you in advance for your help. Michael
     
  2. tcr1146

    tcr1146 Well-Known Member

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    Check your email Mike. Tom Rhoads
     
  3. chipking

    chipking TS Member

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    Sgt. Mike I used a case neck turner (Both Forester and Hart) for my 600 and 1000 yard 308 ammo. Reamers are for the inside of the case neck and usually aren't needed unless the case develops a "ring" at the inside of the shoulder / neck junction and the bullet you use must be seated deeper than that. To determine proper OD of the case neck you need to know your exact chamber measurements and the diameter of the bullet you will use. When completed the diameter of the neck of a LOADED round should be less than the chamber by no more than 3 thousandths of an inch. This keeps the bullet centered and allows enough expansion to release the bullet when fired. To make everything work together you also need target dies and expander buttons to insure a consistent grip on the bullet. If you will notice I did not include the 5.56/.223 in any of this. That is because I never used it for long range.

    --- Chip King ---
     
  4. Jim Porter

    Jim Porter Well-Known Member

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    Michael: I am sure you have good info by now. I do cut necks and use the RCBS hand held outside neck turner. It works great and is easy to operate. I usually stay around .013 for a neck wall. The .013 came from the instructions with the tool and they say that is what is needed to get the best neck tension. The best bet is to check the group of brass that you want to work with and uniform the THINNEST one in the batch and then cut the rest to that dimension. You can cut 100 .308's in an hour or so and easily done while watching TV. Watch out for the lady of the house, brass shavings will get on everything no matter how hard you try to control tham.
    Does it help? I really don't know but it's cool and makes me look like I know what I'm doing. I suspect that in a REALLY good rifle over enough distance the difference could be measured. I do have a .308 with a big barrel and double set triggers and a big scope that shot a five shot group center to center that measured .337" at 100 ONE TIME when Iwas having a good day but it will do about the same thing with any good brass.
    I shot with an old Marine at Camp Perry one time and he said load the best you can with what you have and then get ASS DEEP IN BRASS and learn to shoot what you have. I love those guys!
    Buy one and use it, can't have too many toys!!
    Good shooting
    Jim
     
  5. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    I believe neck turning is the ticket to accuracy for long range shooting. I used to neck ream but now I neck turn and only ream if the neck thickens at the junction of neck and shoulder. I've found in both .223 and .308 that my "desired" groups come easier and faster during load development with turned necks. I think the turning of the outside centers the case in the chamber and thus aligns the bullet with the centerline of the bore whereas neck reaming just uniforms the inside of the neck which may or may not have walls of uniform thickness. (good theories, anyway).
     
  6. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Good information. I have no tight neck chambers, And outside turning is not necessary as far as I know.

    If the neck has too much clearance I believe accuracy would suffer. I do have to turn the 308 cases I resize to .243, or I get about 15% split necks.

    I would measure the fired case neck, and then after the neck size die is used.


    HM
     
  7. Sgt. Mike

    Sgt. Mike TS Member

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    Great information from everyone please keep the information coming. Thanks, Michael
     
  8. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    I used to ream the necks with a Lee Target Loader, the kit had everything needed to make good quality target ammo. HMB
     
  9. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    No. I stop when a 100 yard group gets into the twos. The group shown is from my Browning A-Bolt II 308 Heavy Barrel Boss.
     
  10. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    Same rifle in 223/5.56mm.
     
  11. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    The Lee target loader as mentioned by hmb above was a marvel of ingenuity...the case was held firmly in the neck sizing die and the reamer guided through the top of the die...closest way of forcing concentricity between inside and outside there was in reaming....I had one also in .308 and with a run-of-the-mill 788 Remington could count on 3/4" groups or better at 100 with no special other tricks. Thanks for the memories.
     
  12. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Your welcome. If you go to www.google.com and clic on images, type in lee target loader, there is a very nice picture on the first page. HMB
     
  13. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    If you are going to this distance you should consider reaming the primer pockets (done once to create a uniform size) and de-burring the inside of the flash hole as well (done once to give a more uniform ignition of the powder).

    Specialized tools are available for both and go a long way towards helping accuracy.

    Neck turning is a positive, especially if you use mixed lots of brass (note - pick one manufacturer and try to stick to this brand as well, better if you can get just one lot). A lot of shooters weigh the brass and segregate via this method. I try to stick to one lot (e.g., a specific year from Lake City).

    Case LOA can be an important factor too. I use a Dremel and cut a vertical slit down the case from the mouth - only needs to be about 1/4 inch deep (if you are looking down on the mouth if the case - it will resemble a pizza - you are cutting the pizza in half).

    Slightly press the sides in. Now place a bullet into this case - the pressure will hold it in place, but the slits will allow it to move back into the case when chambered. By chambering a round and gently removing it from the rifle you can determine the throat depth of your firearm. By knowing how far out the lands start relative to the bullet you can affect accuracy through variation of this distance (There are some rounds this will NOT work as well for - e.g., Weatheby Magnums).

    I have found this to be the best way to 'tune' a rifle - it takes time, but once you find the right LOA for a given round accuracy can be great.

    David D
     
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