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Rifle scope Parralax

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Dave P, Jul 7, 2012.

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  1. Dave P

    Dave P TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I have several rifles beside my trap guns. This may not be the correct forum to ask this but tough shit to those that don't think so.

    My point is I want to find some scopes that are parralax(sp) black ring free. I have tried to read the many product ads. but that gets beyond my patience level. I kow that this is a site of knowledgeable shooters so I ask you politely to help me out here on selecting a middle of the road ($)scope of various, (and your experience). I shoot anything between .223 and .308. Also what are the difference between the types of prisms. Your experience would be appreciated. Thanks, Dave
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    No such thing as parallax free. Some scopes have an adjustable objective lens. That way you can get rid of the parallax at any given yardage. Those are target grade scopes. Hunting scopes an not adjustable and are preset for a given yardage, usually around 125 yards. HMB
     
  3. jim brown

    jim brown Well-Known Member

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    Parallax is resent in all scopes. It can be adjuster out in models that have AO or adjustable objective. A typical scope is only parallax free at the range the objective lense is set for. Hunting scopes without AO are usually set for 100 yards. This gives acceptable results out to about 300 yards nd down to about 50 yards for hunting size targets. If you are hunting a scope without AO is the best choice because you may not have the time or measurements to adjust. If you are a target shooter or long range varminter a scope with AO is clearly the best choice.

    You can see how much parallax is present by holding the rifle absolutely stationary in a rest then moving your eye behind the scope. Parallax is the movement of the cross hairs on the target while the rifle remains absolutely stationary. Generally speaking parallax is present without regard to the price of the scope at quality of the lenses. Price and quality does however impact other important things.

    From an old long range varminter. Hope that helps.
     
  4. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    The scopes that have a side focus (third knob on the left side) are what you're looking for, but it'll be tough to find a mid $ one. The side focus has replaced the adjustable objective to minimize the parallax. Nightforce is one of the better ones, however their prices have really jumped in recent years. Leupold and Sightron are also worth a look. Good luck.
     
  5. wm rike

    wm rike Member

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    As noted in the previous posts, most scopes have parallax set for about 100 yds. High-end scopes (i.e., target/varmit) are parallax-adustable, but it has to be reset for each change in distance-to-target. This whole parallax thing is why some scopes are designated for smallbore use (.22 rimfire) where it is understood that the shooting will usually be well within 50 yds. and something set for 100 yds. just won't cut it.
     
  6. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    I purchased a Leupold Vari-X II 3x9 AO in 1989 and mounted it on a Marlin 336 lever action in .35 Remington. I paid more for the scope and mounts than I did for the rifle but it has been a joy to use over the years.

    In Kentucky, the typical shot on a deer is about 50 yards so that is where I set the AO. The view through the scope at 3X was super bright and super clear. This added valuable shooting time at the beginning and end of each day and I often put it to good use. I even took a nice 8 pointer at over 135 yards in the first few moments of daylight.

    I have bought several Leupold's with AO since then and it is a very good investment to make.

    Ed Ward
     
  7. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Buy a Nikon Buckmaster, they have side focus and several reticles available without killing your wallet. Many power options to suit your purpose.

    Optics Planet should have decent prices.

    HM
     
  8. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    I agree that you can't go wrong with a Leupold, even if you're not buying all their bells and whistles. Vari-X II, Vari-X III, etc.
    And a scope without an external parallax adjustment ring is not necessarily an inaccurate scope. So long as the same face is behind the scope, the eye will generally be in very nearly the same location, so no change in POI. Consistancy = accuracy.
    And regarding more knobs to adjust on your scope, like a accomplished trap shooter told be once regarding adjustable features on the trap gun, sometimes "they help you adjust your way into misses."
    Seems to me like we are being sold a bill of goods with these new $1400 "tactical" scopes that we just can't live without. What's next, Zombie ammo?
    dju
     
  9. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    davidjayuden hits the nail on the head. The trick to using a scope without a parallax adjustment is a consistent cheekweld and proper stock comb to scope geometry that places your eye dead center with the scope centerline.
     
  10. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    I'll second halfmile's recommendation of the Nikon Buckmaster. Have a 6 x 18 on my AR 5.56. I have been very pleased with the quality and flexibility.
     
  11. Dave P

    Dave P TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Thanks for all your experienced and educated replys. I will take them all into consideration. Dave
     
  12. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    The parallax adjustment is just minutely refocusing the image to be in the focal plane of the reticle for your given distance. As others said above, don't worry about it overy much. Regardless of scope, if you keep your eye centered with the crosshair, there is no parallax by definition.
     
  13. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    So just for the sake of conversation, let me ask this. Does a cheaper scope have more (greater) parallax than a more expensive one, even if both have no external adjustment options? So if you bench both scopes and move your head side to side behind them, does the cheaper scope's crosshairs move more than the higher quality scope?
    dju
     
  14. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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  15. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Also, just for the sake of conversation, lower priced scopes have brightness issues, often have multi-part tubes, have significantly less eye relief, less field of view and, on variable power scopes, the point of impact changes significantly as the degree of magnification changes.

    I prefer Leupold scopes. They cost more but have a lifetime free service warranty and just perform better in the field. I like to see the little gold ring on the objective lens, it is a touch of class.

    If you shop EBAY, there are typically many Leupold's offered for sale. Newer models can be pricy but sometimes you can find a good deal on an older model. Ring marks on the scope tube do not affect the optics. The lifetime Leupold warranty is not limited to the original owner.

    An older Leupold 3X9 AO at under $200 is a good deal unless you really need high magnification.

    Ed Ward
     
  16. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Before adjusting the objective lens you should adjust the lens nearest your eye to get the crosshairs clear and sharp. That will enable you to get the target image and crosshairs in the same plane. HMB
     
  17. oz

    oz Active Member

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    black ring???? hyour kids are putting shoe polish on your scopes objective lens rings again.
     
  18. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Most guys tend to get a lot more magnification than they really need. The problems of parallax and the 'black ring' (eye relief) increase with magnification.

    One of my favorite big game scopes is the Leupold VXIII 1.5x5. This is a great compact scope that is capable of precision work at suprisingly long range. It has a generous range of eye relief so the 'black ring' doesn't come into play in most any shooting position. You won't be able to detect a parallax shift either. But what you do have is crystal clear optics in a very rugged and small package. It works for me out here in the open country of Northern NV and I do shoot extended distances.
     
  19. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    Didn't quite understand your black ring reference...do you mean you see a black ring around your field of view? Or are you referring to the black adjustment ring on the scopes objective end???...if you are speaking of the first instance thats more a function of eye relief..if you see a black ring looking through it ..then usually its because you are too far back and need to get the scope closer to your eye...it should then disappear when you find the correct distance...be careful if you have a hard kicker though or its your eye that will be black
     
  20. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    For further confusion, here's a bit on eye relief. I was told at a scope seminar that the reason people love Leupy's is they have a very forgiving eye relief. I concur.

    He also said that other expensive scopes will have a less forgiving eye relief but a much wider field of view, which may be desirable for long range hunting like antelope and sheep. Apparently the scope, if made for eye relief will have less field of view, and you can't have it both ways.

    My deer gun has a Leupy 3x that snaps the picture into view instantly as AI mount the rifle if a deer jumps up. Good.

    For Pdogs I use 6-24 Nikons and a Zeiss that I peer through all day with no fatigue. Also good.

    You just have to fit the tool to the job.

    HM
     
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