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RIFLE RELOADING

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Terminator, Sep 5, 2009.

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  1. Terminator

    Terminator TS Member

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    Hi.
    Thinking of getting into reloading rifle shells. What equipment would you recommend that I need to get started. I would like to reload for hunting and some target shooting. I would like to buy good equipment that I can add to as need arises. I would be loading for 9.3 x 62, 300 Win mag, 300 Ultra mag, 30-06, 223 and 270.
    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. Straight99

    Straight99 Member

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    Rifle is not like shotgun where you buy a press and your done. Find someone that reloads rifle that you trust had have him show you so you get the idea and then go from there. Lee works as well as any if price as a problem. Some of there reloading tools make some of the most accurate loads.
     
  3. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    For starts get a RCBS "rock chucker" press.Some other tools you will need. Loading blocks, a scale powder measure, case lube and case lube pad to slick up your casings,primer tray. This is a good start but you will find other things as you go along to make life easier. Bulge.
     
  4. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    If you are serious about precision reloading of rifle shells, go to the Sinclair International website, or that of Robert W Hart & Son. They both cater to competitive rifle shooters. They have almost everything needed to assemble a precision reloaded round. If you want to do it right, don't skimp on quality.
     
  5. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    Don't forget to buy dial calipers, a trimmer, and a case prep kit. Learn to read the calipers, figure percentages, and follow the powder makers' load information. Pick up new data books from the powder companies annually and use the latest information.

    Regardless of what many think, there is not a "great" margin of safety between what the makers list as "maximum" and what really is maximum.
     
  6. poacherjoe

    poacherjoe Well-Known Member

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    Get the reloading manual and read it!! Then figure out all of the equipment needed and price it.If money isn't a problem go for it but from my experiance it isn't worth the cost factor unless you do alot of shooting.Example when you get a load worked up for the 270, how many deer are you going to shoot?
    It only takes one shot! If you buy a 20 rd box of shells for 30 bucks it will last along time vs 500+ dollars in reloading equipment!The only way it is cost effective is if you do alot of varmint or target shooting with say your 223.You can shoot thousands of ground squirrels and save money reloading your own ammo.If you still want to reload and save some money buy the equipment off EBAY! Good luck PJ
     
  7. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    In my little reloading clinics I give a pretest. One of the questions is: Are you going to load and shoot at least ten boxes of the caliber you want to load for? Reloading is fun but can be cost prohibitive. I started in the process with a 310 tong tool loading for a Hornet and moved on up over the years to a pair of Star Progressives loading commercial. Now it is back to hobby stuff in a bunch of calibers. You pays your money and makes your choices. It is not true that you can always make ammo that is better than the factories, but is true often enough to have fun trying.

    I have a lot of fun making cast bullets and getting wonderful groups out of everything from .222 through 45-70.
     
  8. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Terminator, since you asked this question on a shotgun site, if you reload shotshells and get a little impatient loading shotshells. Don't even think about loading precision rifle cartridges! Not even close to being on the same planet and no comparisons at all between the two! You received good advice above too.

    However, you can custom make loads for each of your rifle calibers that can't be purchased from ammo factories. Each rifle caliber will like one loaded bullet/powder/case and primer combo the best for it's best accuracy. Length of throat will tell you how to seat the bullets for proper depth for each rifle also for best accuracy.

    It will take a long time to find each load your looking for too if ultimate accuracy is what your after in all those rifles. I've whittled my center fire rifles down to 2 and only load for those now and I squeezed all the accuracy I can shoot from both. A Sako 300 Win Mag and a 6MM Rem. Good luck and have lots of patience!! Hap
     
  9. iiranger

    iiranger TS Member

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    Hit the gun shows and buy up 4 or 6 or more different used reloading manuals. Read them. One will "read easier" than the others. Buy a new one of that brand for current load data. (And gather the free data manuals put out by the powder companies.) In addition, going over the process several times will give you an idea of how you wish to "go." "Find your groove." The super benchrest boys don't even use a press but go nuts with case prep tools. If you are loading something in black powder pressure only... black powder or limited shotgun, the Lee Loader will suffice. Or the Lyman 310 tools (if still available. Haven't looked lately). I have nothing against the Rockchucker press, don't plan to lose mine anytime soon, but I also have the LEE hand press and for resizing cases (by the 1,000) in front of the boob tube for p'dog expeditions, plenty. Nice "feel" for priming too. Ch4d.com has a nice priming tool. If you want the Rolls Royce of presses, visit the corbins, Dave at corbins.com or Richard at rceco.com. Their presses are over engineered for swaging bullets and reloading is "tip toeing thru the tulips" for them. Cost more though. You going to turn case necks? Any idea what that is...?

    As said, if you are in the "shoots good, goes bang" group and go for deer maybe 3or 4 times in 10 years... factories at any price might be a better idea. Days of $18.00 Springfields (03's) and $0.01 per round '06 ammo (yes, surplus with fmj bullet which can be replaced fairly easy) are gone. (Darn). Free fired brass. Read, find your groove, then you will be addicted and always want to add something else.. Be warned. ADDICTED! Luck.
     
  10. Phil E

    Phil E TS Member

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    You'll need at least 2 loading books, so you can confirm all data to be sure a book doesn't have a misprint, Speer, Hornady, Nosler, Sierra. And you'll need: a press, a used single-stage RCBS JR will be $60 or so at a gun show; dies, I like Dillon & Redding, but also use RCBS & Hornady, $25-60; a balance-beam (not an electronic) scale, about $60, I like the Redding, also RCBS, Dillon & Lyman (not the plastic Lee;) inexpensive steel (not plastic) dial caliper $20; primer flipper (brass Dillon is best) if you plan to prime from a tube into the machine, or a hand-primer instead if not; loading block, plastic or wood, with 50-60 holes in it for holding your cases; powder measure, I like the Redding, also powder funnel; kinetic bullet puller, hammer-type $15; lube pad and lube, or spray lube like Dillon DLC or Hornady One-Shot. This'll get you started. Eventually you'll get a case-trimmer to cut cases to the original OAL, a tumbler and walnut-shell tumbling media, and a bunch of other stuff. Just like with shotshell, that first box will cost you hundreds of dollars, so as said above, be sure you'll shoot enough to warrant the cost. Also like with shotshell, an experienced buddy can save you grief starting out. Sources: Midway, Cabelas, Dillon, Lock Stock & Barrel, Grafs, Sinclair. Phil E
     
  11. Grayson Mayne

    Grayson Mayne Member

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    Terminator, get any kind of press you want as long as it's an RCBS rock chucker!!!
    Get either Redding or RCBS reloading dies. You need a good set of scales. I would like to see you get a set of electronic digital scales. Get with a rifle shooter and reloader that you trust and do what he tells you. Above all get a book on reloadoing and read it all. Read it like it will save you life because it will. If you have any questions that you can't get answered please feel free to P/M me. I am not an expert but I can keep you alive and sighted.
     
  12. moore5833

    moore5833 TS Member

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    I learned from my friends father when i was 16yrs old. If you can find some one to teach you-and maybe share thier tools-it will save you alot of headaches. But you can really improve your rifles accuracy with reloads. My sons and myself have never harvested big game or varmits with store bought shells. Only my handloads!!
     
  13. DecalDude

    DecalDude Active Member

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    Reloading rifle and pistol is a bit more tedious then placeing a empty hull and wad and pulling handle.
    I was taught years ago by a friend who passed away but being shown how and watched do is way easier then reading about it.
    Yes if you plan on loading cases more then 1x you will need calipers or a go nogo gauge. Cases should be clean, A tumble is best. Lee makes what is called challenger breech Anniversary kit http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=423081 for $89 at Midwayusa
    its got all the basic tools except the tumbler you need to get started.
     
  14. JJJ

    JJJ TS Member

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    You can't go wrong with a Dillon. They sell a video showing you how to work their 550B machine. This would explain everything to you. Their guarantee is the best in the business for rifle/pistol
    Joe Jordan
     
  15. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    If you think loading shot shells was expensive. The FIRST thing you need is a BIG piggy bank. I have over $100,000 in loading stuff and want more
    Dillon is over priced
    Redding is making junk now
    Lee is very good for the money
    RCBS is near the top
    Lyman is very good
    Hornady is good
    If you are loading those rifle cal
    DO NOT go progressive
    Start up will cost $1000
    Feebay is good place to start but know the price of new before you buy there
     
  16. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    My observation on metallic rifle reloading is that the actual assembly of a cartridge is about 5% of the effort. The other 95% entails brass preparation, bullet weighing and sorting, determining the proper overall cartridge length for each specific rifle and research of loading data.

    You will entail a fair amount of expense and a significant investment of time so don't even think about metallic reloading unless you have the funds, patience, time and commitment.

    If you think that you are going to significantly improve over factory reloading performance and accuracy, think twice. Yes, you can load faster and more accurate than factory but it is not automatic.

    Do not even think about exceeding published data. Shot shell pressures are in the 7000-11000 cup range while rifle data is often in the 50,000-60,000 cup range.

    That said, I enjoy loading for .223 Remington, .308 Winchester, 30-06 Springfield and .35 Remington.

    The RCBS Master Reloading kit and RCBS accessory kit are a good start. The Speer reloading manual was and is my bible. It is provided with the RCBS Master Reloading kit.

    The Sinclair catalog has lots of goodies. Fred Sinclair, who founded the company, is a world class bench rest shooter. They may be a little more costly than other sources but thay have quality products many of which are their own design.

    When I hunted deer, I relied on Remington "Green Box" ammo and it never let me down.

    For .308 Winchester, it is hard to beat the Federal Premium 168 Grain Match King loading for accuracy on paper. This is not a hunting bullet.

    Be careful and have fun.

    Ed Ward
     
  17. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    You do not load top shelf ammo on a progressive, no matter the make. Progressives are to load bulk ammo , as in varmint, practice, fun ammo.....If you want to set group records you will load on a single stage with specialty dies and prep brass , the bullets, use single lots of powder, constantly change your brass, and start over,sort them for weight,length, prep primer pockets,flash holes.turn necks,trim length,sort bullets by length and weight, trim meplats, point bullets, and play with bullet jump or jamb in the lead........Lot of work to do it right.....you can load about 2500 trap shells in the time it takes to load precision ammo.

    Factory chambers are simple to load for, just don't expect ....... .250" groups from them
     
  18. psfive

    psfive Member

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    Spend a little less money on a press and a little more on a scale. Weigh EVERY powder charge. Read read read those metalic reloading manuals. Inspect EVERY case inside and out. Learn what a case that should not be loaded again looks like. Take your time. Make sure your cases are the correct OAL and clean. Learn what you can from someone who knows what they are doing. Go slowly. Enjoy the process and the experience. Then take what you have done to the bench or the field and complete the experience. Then say I did that with my own two hands and head. Most of all be careful and safe and have fun. Best shooting you will ever do is with a load you built all by your self. Paul
     
  19. Chichay

    Chichay TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Terminator,

    Lots of good advice in the preceding posts. You didn't mention the action of the rifles you would be reloading for. For bolts in informal target shooting, you might want to neck size your brass only; for semis, pumps, levers and for hunting, full length resizing is a must.

    As other have mentioned, it is a completely different ball game than shotshell reloading. It requires more of everything; from equipment, to time, to $$$$.

    As all of us have experienced, you will undoubtedly find the hobby fascinating.
    Feel free to PM me for any questions you might have.

    Chichay
     
  20. nsrailroad

    nsrailroad Member

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    Can you save any money by reloads rifle and pistol ammo, if so what's better new or used equipment?
     
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