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Rifle Break in?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by glenn mcleod, Dec 22, 2007.

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  1. glenn mcleod

    glenn mcleod Member

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    I bought a new Rifle, T3 Tikka,7MM Mag, Any of you rifle shooters have a PROPER method to break in a new barrel? Glenn
     
  2. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    Go to the web site of one of the best barrel makers in the business,,Krieger Barrels Inc. It contains a link that has recommended break in and cleaning procedures.


    Mash on the link.


    Their recommendations pertain to high quality barrels. Factory barrels generally require many more single bullet and clean sessions. Many, many more as a matter of fact, to significantly reduce the copper fouling build-up.


    If you reload, get out your micrometer, measure the diameter at the base of the bullet of all the various manufacturers bullets you have in that caliber, then use the largest.
     
  3. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    If it is a hunting rifle, just shoot it. Get it sighted in and then clean it. If it is a bolt gun put a little white lithium gease on the bolt lugs. The next time you shoot it see where the first shot out of a cold barrel hits. That's the shot that counts. HMB
     
  4. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    I used to spend hours trying to polish a steel bore with a copper jacket until I was put onto "Bore Bright" from Brownell's. While I was still in the active reserves, the battalion armorers routinely used it (or a similar product) in the bores of the tactical rifles. I use it to clean/polish a new bore before firing and to clean between stings of shots. My zero is stable after 20 to 25 rounds if use it after each pair of shots.


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    Morgan
     
  5. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    What Capt. Morgan suggests is good. It's probably the better recommendation for factory barrels. Now,,it's absolutely essential that you get a high quality cleaning rod or rods, and rod guide if you are going to do much 'stroking' with a cleaning rod.
     
  6. oz

    oz Active Member

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    go to ar15.com for a lot of info on cleaning. oz
     
  7. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    Just CLEAN IT and SHOOT IT. Cripes.
     
  8. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    The above site claims to have the original J-B bore paste formula. this should speed the break in process.

    I would not get real paranoid on a production rifle, but a couple of range sessions with the shoot/clean regime should get the process started and smooth down the bore for longer life and better accuracy.

    HM
     
  9. alfermann66

    alfermann66 Member

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    Depends on what you want from the rifle. If you're after deer and expect 50 yd. shots....follow HMB's advice. If you're varmiting, close ain't good enough. Try the gun first...you may not need to do anything. If it won't put 5 rounds in one hole at 100 yds. the bbl. needs to be lapped in. Capt. Morgan's way will work....personally, I use lead bullets rolled in a mild abrasive creme and loaded just strong enough to assure they clear the bbl. when fired. Depending on the hardness of the bbl. steel....10 to 20 will do it. Clean, clean, clean and clean again to assure all abrasive is gone, then oil everything, espescially the bbl. lightly with an ashless oil. Run a dry patch through the bbl. before firing again.

    Buz
     
  10. Phil E

    Phil E TS Member

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    I agree with Buz, you won't hurt it a bit by shooting a few rounds to see what you seem to have. Dan Lilja (article above) has a break-in procedure that I use, which is similiar to Sharky's: a thorough deep-clean after each shot for the first 5-10, then after each 2-3 for the next 10-20. Some factory barrels are a little rough, but I would not expect that of your Tikka, my guess will be it's nicely lapped. You can roughly test a barrel by pushing a greased dead-soft bullet of appropriate size through it, noting loose/tight spots & roughness, which helps give you an idea what you're up against. Some hunting barrels just foul like crazy unless seriously lapped, as in fire-lapping like Buz mentions; I've had a few, and used the NECO kit (www.Neconos.com.) You'd learn more than you'd imagine by calling Dan Lilja & asking him. Phil E
     
  11. locdoc

    locdoc Member

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    Location:
    Antrim, NH
    From Lilja Barrels

    Centerfire Maintenance:

    We recommend that your new Lilja rifle barrel be properly broken-in to obtain the best accuracy. A proper break-in will help ensure that your barrel will clean easily in the future and that you will achieve maximum accuracy potential. Please follow these important instructions.
    We are concerned with two types of fouling: copper fouling, which is caused by bullet jacket material being left in the barrel, and powder fouling. During the first few rounds a lot of copper fouling will be left in the barrel. It is important to remove this fouling completely, after each shot, to help prevent a build-up later on. Powder fouling is ongoing, but easy to remove. Do not use moly-coated bullets during the break-in procedure.

    Break-in Procedure:

    For an effective break-in the barrel should be cleaned after every shot for the first 10-12 rounds or until copper fouling stops. Our procedure is to push a cotton patch that is wet with solvent through the barrel. This will remove much of the powder fouling and wet the inside of the barrel with solvent. Next, wet a bronze brush with solvent and stroke the barrel 5-10 times. Follow this by another wet patch and then one dry patch. Now soak the barrel with a strong copper removing solvent until all of the blue mess is removed from the barrel. The copper fouling will be heavy for a few rounds and then taper off quickly in just one or two shots. Once it has stopped or diminished significantly it is time to start shooting 5 shot groups, cleaning after each one. After 25-30 rounds clean at a normal interval of 10-25 rounds. Your barrel is now broken-in.

    Normal cleaning:

    For a normal cleaning (after a string of 10-25 shots) after break-in, the above procedure should be used, but stop short of soaking the barrel with the strong copper remover. A good rule of thumb is to stroke the barrel with a brush, one cycle for every shot fired.

    Periodic cleaning:

    It is probably a good idea to use a strong copper removing solvent every 200 rounds, or so, to check the barrel for copper fouling. We do not recommend the routine use of abrasive cleaners for normal cleaning. However they can be used every 500-1000 rounds to remove the carbon build-up (caused by powder fouling) in the throat area of the barrel. To use, wrap a cotton patch around a worn out brush or a cleaning jag and liberally apply the abrasive cleaner to the patch. Short stroke the abrasive for 6" or so in the throat area and one or two full length passes through the barrel. Do not clean the barrel like this for more than 1-2 minutes.

    Suggested equipment and solvents:

    It is important to use an action rod guide when cleaning. The guide aligns the rod with the bore and helps prevent uneven wear in the throat area. Be careful not to raise the handle end of the rod while stroking. This will put a "belly" in the rod that will wear the barrel. We suggest that plastic coated rods, like the Dewey and Parker-Hale, be used.
    Our preferred cleaning solvent is Butch's Bore Shine made by BBS Industries (406-652-2495). This solvent is excellent at attacking both powder and copper fouling. We recommend it for both break-in and regular cleaning.
    For occasional use only, abrasives like J-B paste, Flitz, or RemClean can be used.
    Do not use a stainless steel brush in your barrel under any circumstances.
    Do not apply a strong copper remover, like Sweets, on a bronze brush. It will ruin the brush and give the false indication that the barrel has copper in it.
    For shooters wishing to use moly-coated bullets we do not recommend shooting more than 25 rounds or so without using the normal cleaning procedure outlined above.

    Doug Whiton, P/W dealer/dist
     
  12. glenn mcleod

    glenn mcleod Member

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    Thanks for all the good info, you guys(and Gals) are always very informative. Merry Christmas to everyone on Trapshooters.com Glenn
     
  13. quicky

    quicky Member

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    DO not forget the bore guide!!!! Very important. Quicky
     
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