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Remington Primers

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Fritzboy, May 14, 2009.

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  1. Fritzboy

    Fritzboy TS Member

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    I have used Rem primer 209P and they always felt a little light. I saw Rem makes a 209PSTS. Does it have more punch,brisance? I have a lot of Rem hulls and I prefer Rem primers but they feel so weak. Any thoughts?
     
  2. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I think you are talking about one and the same primer. They come in packaging with the STS logo on it. Compare the loading data for various primers and you will see the Remington primer combos generally result in lower pressures with given component selections than most other brands. This could be a good thing depending on what your load objective is. Never thought of them as 'weak' though and never any squibs or duds with them. The remington 209p is my favorite primer and apparently other people think the same because they tend to come at premium cost. If you want a 'hot' primer try the Federal 209A.
     
  3. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    The primer is the same except for the flash hole which is a little smaller. You don't say what powder you are using. If possible you could try using a faster burning powder. HMB
     
  4. al391claybuster

    al391claybuster TS Member

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    STS is my favorite primers. With listed loads of Alliant Powder, I never thought about a weak load. I pnly wish I could find a place to order them. All places I know of are sold out. Where I live, I have no way to pick them up close to home. Thanks David
     
  5. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    Fritzboy,

    Please describe what you mean by "felt a little light" and "feel so weak"?

    John C. Saubak
     
  6. Fritzboy

    Fritzboy TS Member

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    Been reloading for over40 years. But thanks for your responses. Just tha Rem primers felt a little weak in some loads. It's probably me. Can't Rem and Fed 209A to shoot the same with the same recipe. I am sure the Rem's will work just fine if losded as per the manual. I am glad to hear of you success with them. If I can find them I will reload them. P.S. I use fast powders such as red dot, clays, or clay dot and shoot mostly 1oz.
     
  7. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    You didn't say where you live/shoot. Remington primers are a little "weak" in cold weather.
     
  8. Fritzboy

    Fritzboy TS Member

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    Live in South Jersey. Can get cold in winter. Rem primers seemed to lack a lit4tle zip in cold weather. Ceteris paribus, I cannot A Rem to do what a Fed 209a does with same powder load. I was just hopeing that Rem would put a litle more heat intheir primers. Nothing loads better in s Sts case. It's all in the primer pocket in the STS cases. Thanks
     
  9. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    Fritzboy

    The Remington 209P and STS are actually the same animal. The only one that might be different would be the ones packaged for the in-line muzzleloaders. I know a few other manufacturers have actually modified their primers for the in-lines.

    The Remington 209P primers are "usually" considered mild, but that is not always the case. I haven't had too many problems with them in cold weather, but have had a few. They also have a reputation for some large flames coming out of the ejection ports of many autoloaders at night, using several powders. One Green Dot load I used them in was spectacular. In the back fence games, they distract other shooters (Guy on your Right) enough that I might even win a few, from time to time.

    I have used the Winchester W209 and Federal 209A primers in most loads in cold weather. They have done rather well for me. I won't use Fiocchi 616 primers, except in the summer. In all cases, be sure to adjust your loads for the different primers by using reliable published data for the exact components you are loading. Changing primers can have a drastic effect on pressures. I've chronographed most of my loads and the Remington primers are far from the worst for consistency, but they do often produce a little less velocity with the same set of components, or require a little more powder to attain the desired velocity. I generally don't use them in loads intended for cold weather. They seem to lose a little more velocity to the cold, than my other primer choices. Looking over the published data might show some of the differences, but won't tell you much about cold performance. I used a lot of 700-X over the years and it's a good example to use, illustrating the differences in primers and wads, with regard to velocity and pressure. Find an older IMR pamphlet that lists the usual loads and you'll see what I mean. Mine is about five or six years old and it puts it all in columns you can compare. Even the current online data is pretty easy to compare. For cold weather testing, I put some in the freezer for a few days and then run them over the chronograph while still cold. It will help weed out the bad choices of components.
     
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