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Remington 3200 forearm modification

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by amboy49, Dec 7, 2008.

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  1. amboy49

    amboy49 Well-Known Member

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    I've just a acquired a nice, barely fired Remington 3200. It has had the upgrades done to the reciever but the forearm hasn't been touched. I own another 3200 which was purchased new several years ago - the forearm cracked after a few hundred rounds and a small chip actually broke off the forearm nearest the receiver.

    I plan on speaking with Pat Laib as I understand he is the recognized expert on 3200's - but my question is simply what, if anything can or needs to be done to the forearm to prevent the wood from cracking.

    At this point the wood is in perfect condition - just would like for it to remain so when I start shooting the gun.

    I think I read that the wood problem may occur most due to the ejector springs placing stress on the wood and perhaps can be remedied by adjusting the forearm screw. Other opinions, however, have been offered that it is necessary to glass bed the forearm iron to prevent the forearm from cracking.

    Thoughts, comments, suggestions ?

    Thanks in advance.

    Noel Kendall
     
  2. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Twodogs should alter his remarks to say "...will HELP prevent...."

    Noel it is much cheaper to simply disengage the ejector hammers in the forearm eliminating much of the stress in the rear of the forearm. Any decent smith should be able to do this for you. The gun, so altered, will extract fired shells but the shells won't be ejected out of the chamber. You will have to remove the fired shells from the gun once open which is handy for reloaders anyway. Another tip is to remove the forearm iron and paint an epoxy-like material on the interior surface of the wood of the forearm especially around the back where wood meets metal and also under the lower barrel at the muzzle end.....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  3. grunt

    grunt TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Bob, What about removing a few coils on the ejector springs to remove some of the stress? Ive hear this being done. As for the epoxy wouldn't a fiber grass patch work better. Dave
     
  4. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Grunt, all my personal opinion with some experience, I've never considered fiberglass and seriously doubt there is room for such an extra layer. The epoxy-like material brushed on (I don't mean gobbed on) does not interfere with tight quarters. As far as the lighter spring, I've always had the spring out of the mechanism which permits me to open the gun and remove the shells myself and that's always been my preference. That doesn't ruin any springs for when I might want to restore the mechanism. Cutting the spring would "reduce" the stress and my idea eliminates the stress....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  5. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Cutting the springs works. HMB
     
  6. grunt

    grunt TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Good points Bob.
     
  7. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Additional; cutting the springs doesn't eliminate the necessity of cocking the ejector hammer(s) with each opening as well as having the ejectors still function even though both operations will create less stress. I can't see the dilemma in removing shells manually and that's always been my preference.....Bob Dodd
     
  8. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    You can get very light fiberglass, which can be applied with epoxy. Epoxy by itself isn't that strong.
     
  9. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    dickgtax, the only reason I even mention that "fix" is because later in the "upgrading" by Remington, they did exactly that. The gun I used for some 15 years with never a dilemma was so brushed with some sort of product and could have been nothing more than verathane (sp) or similar. I never had to coat the interior of the forearm or stock at the receiver metal myself but mention the recommendation just because Remington did it.....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  10. grunt

    grunt TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Bobs right about the epoxy, Ive seen several 3200 forends with this type of renforcement, Ive also seen them with a small strip of fiber glass installed, Thats what made me think of going the fiber glass route.
     
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