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Remington 1100 Questions

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by JPSmall, Feb 23, 2013.

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  1. JPSmall

    JPSmall Member

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    I've been looking at 1100's lately as a back up gun and I know relatively little about them. I know they have been around for along time and have a proven track record. However, there are alot of models and I find it confusing when trying to determine whether a gun is priced right and thought I would ask around.

    Are they all basically the same receiver with different wood and barrels? Are wood and barrels generally interchangeable and is it difficult to do so? What is a fair price for a used 1100 and what factors would impact the price? Anyother input would be appreciated.

    Any thoughts?
    thanks.
    Matt
     
  2. wayno

    wayno TS Member

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    they are, in fact, basically the same receiver with different wood and barrels. but there are one helluva lot of combinations. these are only my humble opinions, but here goes: if you can get a "competition trap" model, go for it. really nice wood, good looking gun, top of the line 1100.

    also a very good choice is a vintage model marked "trap" on the receiver, with a non-monte carlo, high straight stock. very, very comfortable to shoot.

    otherwise, watch for barrels marked, in some fashion, as "trap" barrels-- they often seem to shoot very hot center patterns.

    if you can find an old, steel timney trigger, get it; no matter the cost. your scores will improve substantially.

    and, the damned things need cleaning, often. the price of that soft shooting.

    wayne harrison
    the old north state
     
  3. todddietrich

    todddietrich Active Member

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    Matt,
    I've had an 1100 for about 30 yrs. You can change barrels without much trouble, I have three barrels. You need to keep a few O rings in your tool box. The gas system needs to be kept clean, lightly oiled and can gum up if you don't. Some people complain about the gas system spitting powder residue back in your eyes, but I've never had any problems like that. Then again, some people complain just to see if anyone is listening. Recoil is pretty calm, Beretta is probably smoother.
    regards,

    Todd (Illinois)
     
  4. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    With the exception of very early 2-3/4" receivers, the receivers are all the same.

    The difference between a an 1100 and an 1100 Magnum is not in the receiver, but in the action sleeve. This is the cylinder that slides over the magazine tube. The magnum model has a heavier action sleeve.

    If you want an 1100 for a backup trap gun, I suggest looking for a clean one in the For Sale section here or post a WTB.

    The main considerations are going to be the buttstock and the barrel.

    1100 trap buttstocks come in two styles. Straight and monte carlo. Despite appearance, both have exactly the same comb height. The difference is the butt pad. There is no drop on the straight comb trap stock, and it works better for those with short necks. The monte carlo butt drops, and it works better for those with long necks.

    There is a wide variety of barrels. Standard and light contour. Regular (field) and step ribs. Fixed choke and Rem Chokes. If the gun is used only for trap, a fixed full choke is probably best. If you are going to use it for doubles, you might want screw in choke tubes. Sporting clays will require screw in choke tubes.

    Also, the 1187 Trap is a viable alternative. These have a desirable factory backbored barrel and pattern well. However, while they have screw in choke tubes, there is a fixed restriction in the bore and these barrels will not pattern more open than modified, even if you screw in a skeet choke. They should be used only for trap.

    And, note that the current 1100 Classic Trap uses an 1187 bolt. Not an issue unless you try to install older 1100 barrels on it. The 1187 bolt has a wider extractor, so earlier 1100 barrels have to have the extractor slot widened. This can be done easily with a good file and some patience.

    Yes, these guns will need frequent cleaning. I've found about 600 rounds is the limit for reliability with the dirtiest ammo. I clean mine more often than that, though. It was posted above that this is the price for soft recoil. True, and I'll gladly do the extra cleaning to get it. In my opinion the 1100 and 1187 have the softest recoil.
     
  5. rondl

    rondl Member

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    My experience is that they will spit in your eye. A good paid of shooting glasses are a must.
     
  6. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Personally I've never had debris come back at me with any of my 1100s or 1187s, both with target loads, heavy field loads, buckshot or slugs.

    Having said that, during night shoots the burning debris coming out the ejection port can be impressive. If I were a southpaw shooting a right hand 1100 I'd definitely be wearing a pair of good face hugging protection glasses.
     
  7. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    As usual Brian, you nailed it.
     
  8. Rick Young WY

    Rick Young WY TS Member

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    I have two Remington 1100 guns. One is a synthetic fild grade with 28 inch barrel and the other is the Classic Trap, extra grade wood on the stock. I love them both. Both stocks just seem to fit me perfectly. Mind you I am not expert breaking all I shoot at but I sure enjoy these two guns. I am a little embarrassed to tell you last summer i got to shooting a lot and not cleanning and when i did i had to really really scrub to get that gun clean. It was a nasty mess inside. I got to figuring how many rounds i shot and it was over 1500 and it never missed a cycle for me. Singles and doubles trap and sporting clays. I cannot say enough good about them. Oh yes and recoil is non existant. I am an old guy and i can shoot 200 rounds with no shoulder problems.
    I gave 650 for the Classic Trap and it is 98% used for a back up gun. I gave 400 for the field grade.

    Rick Young WY
     
  9. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Rick, have you tried shooting your 1100s "wet"?

    When I clean my 1100s and 1187s, I put a thin film of Break Free on the parts subject to gas fouling.

    This is the inside of the gas chamber (incorrectly but commonly called the barrel hanger), the inside and face of the action sleeve (the cylinder that slides over the mag tube), the mag tube itself from the o-ring groove back to the receiver, the gas rings, plus a little on the rubber o-ring.

    The purpose is to keep the fouling soft and make it easier to remove. I can function clean these guns in under three minutes. Spotless cleaning takes longer, but it's still much faster than with no lube.

    Note that lube is not needed in the action, other than a thin film to prevent rust. Any more invites dirt and debris collection.

    In hot weather I use Break Free liquid. In cooler weather Break Free spray works best, and it works in hot weather too. In very cold weather, below freezing, I switch to LAW Oil. This is military oil (LAW = light Arctic Weapons). It looks a lot like transmission fluid, but thinner.

    The idea is to get a good coating, but not a dripping mess.

    And yeah, I love the felt recoil reduction of the 1100/1187. My first trap gun was an 870 Wingmaster. It beat the stuffing out of me. I did not like shooting more than 50 shells. 75 shells usually left bruise marks. Looked around for a long time for a gun I liked, but settled on an 1187 because it felt and handled very much like the 870.
     
  10. frostyman

    frostyman Well-Known Member

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    Make sure someone that knows how they work shows you how to properly install the rings and O ring and also how to take the bolt out properly. Never, ever take the barrel off with the bolt locked back and then knock out the pins that hold the trigger in place. If you do if you do the shell feed catch will come unpinded. Also NEVER try taking the trigger apart. You can take it out of the gun just never take it apart.
     
  11. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    A trick to prevent the shell feed latch from coming loose from its staking is to always drive the trigger group pins OUT and back IN from the side OPPOSITE the ejection port.
     
  12. drmikedvm313

    drmikedvm313 TS Member

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    I have been shooting an 1100 sporting for a year now with trap and have put several thousand rounds through it without too many problems...definitely keep extra o rings around and keep the lube on th e magazine tube light...especially during the winter...

    Price for a cheap used one should be in the 600 range whereas one in good shape should be 800-900 depending on the model (prices provided would be about right for a used sporting model)

    I'm getting another gun with sub gauge tubes for skeet but ill never sell this gun...it rocks
     
  13. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    I own an 1100 Trap -T that I bought new in 1974 or 75 I have a 32" trap barrle, 30" trap 28" modified and a slug barrel for the gun. Never failed in all these years and easy to exchange barrles on keep it clean and oiled it will serve you well.
     
  14. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    Daro Handy shot one for years and probably still does. Ond day I saw him cleaning his 1100 at a shoot and I noticed him putting something on the
    magazine tube. I told him that I thought you were supposed to shoot them "dry" and I wondered what he was putting on the tube. He told me he puts a light coat of grease on the tube to keep the carbon from adhering to the metal.

    I use Breadfree CLP on my 391, but for my 1100 I put a little STOS on the magazine tube, and some on the forend support and top of the barrel tang.
     
  15. Greevesman

    Greevesman Member

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    http://www.remingtonsociety.com/images/Rem_1100_Notes__Rev_with_Pix_of_Disassembly.pdf

    This website is very helpful for the Remington 1100. Truly an american classic.
     
  16. Bisi

    Bisi TS Member

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    1100s are great guns. I started hunting with an old hand me down single barrel that kicked the **** out of me. One day my cousin let me shoot his 1100. Wow! No recoil, compared to my old gun. I knew then I had to have one. I saved my money and the 1100 was the first gun I ever purchased. I think I paid $160 for it brand new. Still got it. I never had any trouble with the jamming others seemed to have, but of course I would clean it after every day of shooting. I used to use Rem Oil dry on it, but most seem to shoot em "wet".

    With the way gun prices are, I couldn't comment on the typical used price of em now.
     
  17. dale1957

    dale1957 Member

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    I shoot a diamond anniversary with a classic trap stock cut to be adjustable, a Delrin high rib, Angleport custom worked barrel and chokes. It is a magic gun. Someone else named it that after shooting 2 shells. I will put it up against any semiauto bar none. It's American made, parts r easy to find, and it just points like no other semiauto. It doesn't swing as well as my Krieghoff, but it doesn't have the recoil either. I would recommend a 1100 to anyone. The world record for most shells shot without a malfunction, part breakage, or without cleaning was 24000 by a 1100 in 1978. That record still stands. many have tried, but all have failed. I rest my case.
     
  18. APrice

    APrice Active Member

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    Unfortunately, the build quality on all the new Remington products is abysmal. If looking at used, for about the same money you can get a far superior shotgun in the Winchester Super X Model 1. That said, I have several 1100's from the 60's that I still like to shoot occasionally.

    There was something posted on here long ago called Remington 1100 Notes or something similar. If I can find the link, I'll post it.
     
  19. lesharris2305

    lesharris2305 TS Member

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    I have had and still have several 1100's. The straight stock did not work well for me. The monte carlo was better with a Graco adjustable butt plate installed. Gas ports do need regular cleaning. A slight amount of oil on mag tube and others parts does help in the field cleaning. No solvent on the rubber o ring.
    Les.
     
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