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Remember When a Post WAS a Post

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by pyrdek, Jul 30, 2009.

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  1. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone remember WHY we call it "Post 1"? Why not Station 1 or Position 1.

    If you were around a few years back, quite a few as a matter of fact, do you recall when there was a actual metal post in front of each of the 5 sixteen yard shooting positions?

    For the "Newbies" (maybe only 20 or 30 or 40 years experience) there was a metal stake or "Post" in front of each station. The top of this "Post" had a small flat "tabletop" just about big enough to hold a box or two of shells. It marked the sixteen yard line, give you the right place to stand and provided a place to put your shells. This was before a lot of people even might have had a shell pouch or shooting vest/jacket.

    Another thing at the old trap fields was a large metal handle that connected to a metal rod that ran from behind the trap line to go into the trap house and connect to the trap. This cocked the trap and when "Pull" was yelled by the shooter, the "Puller" who had just cocked the trap, would "pull" the trigger, actually a metal handle on the cocking arm, to spring the trap and let the clay pigeon fly.

    I bet some people thought that this game of Trap Shooting was not around until electricity provided the power. Nope, it was originally a "strong arm" powered sport.

    So ends the history lesson for today.
     
  2. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    I believe there is a club in Colorado somewhere with the rod actuated trap, still in working order. We had them too. You pushed the rod forward to cock the trap, and the setter in the house put on a target.

    I don't know how they did angles. Maybe some one remembers.

    HM
     
  3. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    On some of the bases there was "ratchet teeth" that would change the angle. The kid in the house was "the interrupter" depending if he liked you or not. You couls get beat 2 ways, by the slow pull or the interrupter. Different time's long gone. Shoot often while we can, Bob
     
  4. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I don't go that far back but I do remember placing targets on hand set Winchester machines. You had to be quick and keep your fingers on the top half of the target when setting them. Good thing there weren't any CVRs then....
    and yes, you could 'mess with' shooters particularly on doubles.
     
  5. MTA Tom

    MTA Tom Active Member

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  6. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    Pyrdek:

    I haven't shot at the Olin Corp* gun club on Powder Mill Road, in East Alton, Il. for a while but they had (and maybe still have) those posts. Theirs were made out of a chunk of steel pipe with a flat metal top. For shooter's convenience, the damm things were installed at a perfect height and in the ideal location to bang one's gun barrel.

    sissy

    * Makers of Winchester products
     
  7. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    Sissy...was it more damaging than banging into the mike stand now days?
     
  8. Prescott Gene

    Prescott Gene Member

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    The last time I was at Pacific Rod and Gun Club in San Francisco, they had the posts. It was a big distraction to me as I was always giving it a wide berth with my barrel, even though I never did hit the dad blamed thing!

    Gene
     
  9. BT-99MAX

    BT-99MAX Member

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    If memory serves me correctly, those old pull rod trap machines were called "Kline Pullers". I'm not sure if Kline is spelled right.
     
  10. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    Most trap clubs that shot a lot of targets used the pipe and chain "Kline" release mechanisms. When the pipe was reset for the next target that movement also cocked. You could not do that with a rope and manual cocking by the trap setter would be too dangerous.
     
  11. Jim Brown (the puller)

    Jim Brown (the puller) TS Member

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    One of the years I worked as a field supervisor at the Grand in Vandalia I had the privilege of talking with Bob Allen about the 'old days' of the Grand. He told me about the dairy farmer who pulled there for many years using the lever-actuated traps. This farmer would get a new pair of bib overalls and a new pair of white gloves for the shoot each year.

    Bob described the motion the man used: he would stand on the left side of the lever and, turning at the waist push the lever forward to cock the trap, let go with his right and and swivel back using his left hand to bring the lever to a point just shy of the point where the trap would be released. On the call, he would pull the lever by swivelling at the waist just enough to trigger the target's release and repeat the cocking action.

    Bob said that this man would do this for hours during the Grand. The man's stamina must have been phenominal! Bob also said that this man's pulls were the most consistent of anyone using that old type of trap. He literally had the perfect 'feel' for these machines.

    I started pulling in 1978, just after I started shooting. As a shooter, I understood how important prompt, consistent pulls are to shooters. I always took it as a sign of my pulling 'competence' to have shooters run my trap when I was in the chair.

    I saw many pullers who seemed to take an adversarial attitude with shooters, doing whatever they could to prevent a shooter from running their trap. One in particular that I remember would hold his thumb two inches above the button for a shooter he didn't like, thus delaying the appearance of the target. Can you imagine the mischief a puller could perpetrate with one of the old lever-activated traps?

    BTW...a local club used to have one of these machines that they would open each fall just before hunting season. The target angle was changed by a chain drive. I don't know if it had any kind of interupter.
     
  12. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    I used the term "interupter" in jest. The trap boy, may have been Pat, could know who was shooting next and play games with the placement of the target on the arm and throw a 4 or 5 holer in a heart-beat. These were the days before WW electric powered handsets. I still believe you can get the best pair of doubles targets from the WW handsets and a loader that knows how to properly set them. Shoot often while we can, Bob
     
  13. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    So 'pull' refers to what the puller would do with the lever in the mechanical days. Hah! I've wondered that.

    Shot some over true posts with a 410 at about 10 years of age 45 years ago. This was out in Plano, IL. Ron Janick bought some rich guy's estate where Hollywood movie stars used to be entertained. He had the old setup. Forgot all about it.

    Thanks.
     
  14. 320090T

    320090T Well-Known Member

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    Too bad one can't be set up at Sparta, I'd like to see one in action.
     
  15. Hitapair

    Hitapair Active Member

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    It's off the subject, sorta, but Jim Brown the pullers comment about the farmer getting a new pair of bibs before each Grand reminds me of the farmer from Iowa that would come up to MN each year and fish bullheads for a week. Each year he'd put a new pair of bibs on, get a crisp $50 bill from the bank, fish for a week and never change either one.
     
  16. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    Up here, we call bullheads..Iowa walleyes

    Doug
     
  17. lefthdr

    lefthdr Member

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    We still have the posts and if you look in the lower right corner, that's where the lever was
    [​IMG]
     
  18. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    Cool slices of history! Lefthdr, where is your club?
     
  19. lefthdr

    lefthdr Member

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    North west New Jersey
     
  20. mcneeley5

    mcneeley5 Member

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    The Cline Bros. mechanism was an electric upgrade to the pull pipe Western trap. It had a large bull gear that had a spot with no teeth, when the release button was pressed the solinoid released the trap-gear cycled the machine while the trap boy placed a target. I have a fully functional Cline and trap. I also built a full pull pipe field at the Double Adobe trap range. From 1990-2007 we held an annual shoot on the field, we had a blast on the old trap. We also used that field for 16 yard shoot-offs as it seperated the shooters from the bullshitters!
     
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