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Rem 3200 ?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by greyduck, Jun 19, 2009.

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  1. greyduck

    greyduck TS Member

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    How can you tell all the updates have been done from the factory on the 3200's? Is there a mark or stamp somewhere on the gun?
    Thanks Larry
     
  2. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Yes, the factory placed a dot (period) between the serial number and "O/U" on the bottom of the receiver when they did the updates. I'd assume Pat Laib did or does still also. However, this would be easily faked by a miscreant so to be sure, look at the bottom of the breech face, lower than the firing pin holes, and you should find allen head screw heads visible in each lower corner.....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  3. 333t

    333t Member

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    Somewhere around the 25000 serial no. range, Remington incorporated the updates in factory production. These guns will have only the upper pin through the rear of the receiver. Earlier guns have a lower pin as well and these are the ones that needed the factory update.

    Phil
     
  4. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    I was just wondering was their really alot of problems with the non updated guns? I've had both and never a problm except for some light hammer springs.

    Joe
     
  5. goatskin

    goatskin TS Member

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    <i>I was just wondering was their really alot of problems with the non updated guns?</i>

    A lot? ... There were ENOUGH problems that Remington spent a bunch of money fixing them.

    It was a combination problem, both Rem's fault: design 'insufficiency' and not knowing their customer.

    For at least a century, in a 'normal' boxlock, where the head of the stock meets the inside of the frame forms a recoil shoulder, and the wood and metal are designed to be 'one'. In the 3200 (but, strangely, not in the Model 32), there was a (designed!) few thousandth's gap between the inside wood 'tongue' and the rear shoulder of the frame.

    Remington preferred the top and bottom tang and face against the stock-bolt hole to be their recoil shoulder, not where it 'should' be.

    When/if the stock was put on extra-tight, or wood being what it is and shooters being what they are, in rain and different humidities for storing & shooting, etc, the wood swelled and it warped the frame enough that there were some FTF issues.

    I don't know what the forend issues were, but if you clearanced the head of the stock and bedded it well, there was no more issue, regardless of if the allen-head braces that were done.

    Bob
     
  6. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    Maybe so Goatskin....but... 3200 don't blow up!
     
  7. goatskin

    goatskin TS Member

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    <i>Maybe so Goatskin....but... 3200 don't blow up! </i>

    Yup, but that's - SURELY - because when they were popular, Spolar loaders, Cheddite primers and Promo powder weren't around, plus, $1000 guns just.don't. blow.up.

    I'm a big fan of that clunky-monster.

    There are only two non-Russian guns in the world that perform better when they have been cleaned on the floor of a car wash - and the other one is made by Remington, too.

    Bob
     
  8. Old Ranger

    Old Ranger Member

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    greyduck,

    There's another upgrade that you really should have done on your 3200 as well as the receiver upgrade.

    The forend metal tends to bend over prolonged use, causing the forend wood to pull away from the metal. This causes cracking and other nasty problems. Laib's has a fix, however, that entails welding a stiffener to your forend iron and then rebluing the whole deal. That kept my old 3200 working perfectly for its last 10,000 birds.

    Will H.
     
  9. len loma

    len loma TS Member

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    shoot well? yes They have many problems that pop up down the road while shooting them. To me they are nothing but a money pit. Better guns out there for around the same price or less.
     
  10. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    Ahab, I had a very good friend blow his 3200 into a large pile of junk, attributed to one of his less than stellar reloads on a PW. If we try hard enough, there's not much we can't screw up. Shoot often while we can, Bob
     
  11. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    greyduck, Old Ranger describes the forearm upgrade that was an invention from Pat Laib who is still the place to send these guns for current needs. I found, however, by disengaging the ejectors in the forearm, there was no such tension and hard work causing the damage he describes. This is a pretty easy thing to do, maybe best by any decent gunsmith. It can be done by removing the ejector cocking rods in the receiver internals or by removing the ejector springs in the forearm/ejector mechanism and leaving the ejector hammers uncocked. The gun will still extract and provide an easy removal of spent shells....Bob Dodd
     
  12. 333t

    333t Member

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    The 3200 forend metal has an adjustable feature that can loosen or tighten the break open action of the gun. The procedure is covered in the owner's manual. Along with this adjustment, there is an angled machine screw that will take up any space that develops between the wood and forend iron. It is a good idea to periodically check this and tighten it up if you see a gap developing between wood and metal at the rear of the forend. Kept snug, there should be no damage to the forend. I don't believe there was ever a factory update on the forend, only the receiver.

    Phil
     
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