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Reloading Question

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by bubba68, Mar 26, 2008.

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  1. bubba68

    bubba68 Member

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    I recently moved into a new house and now need to set up my reloading bench. My question revolves around the best location, given that neither of my options are "climate controlled".

    Choice 1) Inside my 80 x 40 pole barn, concrete floor, no A/C or heat. Choice 2) Small sub-basement under the house - the room is about 9 x 15 with concrete floors and walls. The rest of the basement is crawl space with gravel floor.

    My concern is the amount of humidity/moisture in the air in both locations. I am afraid that powder may not drop consistently. Am I worrying too much about nothing?

    I store my powder and primers with my guns inside the house which is obviously climate controlled. One thought is to fill the powder hopper each time I reload and then drain the hopper when I am done. This will at least limit the amount of time the powder is exposed to the humidity/moisture.

    Any comments are greatly appreciated.
     
  2. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    The sub-basement is in lower portion of the house? It must derive some benefit from the heat/AC, but regardless a dehumidifier could be a solution, if you have/can run some electric.

    I think the biggest + of the sub-basement is that, unless prone to flooding, it is a defined, controllable space.

    My $0.02,

    Jay
     
  3. bubba68

    bubba68 Member

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    Jay,

    For my situation, the dehumidifier won't work in the sub-basement, as it has a large opening to the crawl space. Basically, the dehumidifier would have to work throughout the entire carwl space to be effective - and we live in a 3,000 s.f. ranch.

    Also, a dehumidifier would worry me, as it might make the air too dry and cause static electricity.

    Thanks for the info.
     
  4. 100straight

    100straight Member

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    My recommendation is to close in the basement from the crawlspace and put in a dehumidifier. I had a reloading room in a basement with a dehumidifier for 10 years with no static problem. The dehumidifier is adjustable, and your loader should be grounded anyway.

    Shoot well and often,

    Mark.
     
  5. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    Although I haven't seen your sub-basement, I can't imagine that it would be too difficult to partition it from the crawl space with some builder's polyethylene plastic even if you would just hang it from whatever is overhead. Tape the joints between plastic sheets (if any) with clear tape that is specifically designed to join poly to itself and to other surfaces (home center). Spaces between joists could be filled with corrugated cardboard bent and stapled to span each joist space.

    Dehumidifiers are adjustable; they will dry the air as much as you want. But since you're working with a cool damp area to start with, by a dehumidifier that is specifically labled "For Basement Use" so it doesn't freeze constantly.

    Morgan
     
  6. bubba68

    bubba68 Member

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    Mark,

    How do you ground the reloader?

    Sounds like a good idea no matter where the reloader is located.
     
  7. 100straight

    100straight Member

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    To ground the loader just run a wire from metal on the loader, usually the base, to a good ground source, usually the ground wire (green or bare) in an electrical box. Conduit or a copper water pipe can usually be used, but make certain they are really a good ground before trusting them. If you are lucky you might know someone who has the tools to verify the ground if you aren't sure.

    Shoot well and often,

    Mark.
     
  8. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Put the reloading machine in your bedroom. That way when you get up in the middle of the night to pee you can knock out a couple hundred shells before you go back to sleep. HMB
     
  9. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    Just a word about grounding a loader. If one chooses to do so, it is advisable to install a 1 Megohm, 1/2 watt resistor in series in the circuit. It acts as a current limiting resistor if there ever was a ground issue. It is almost always installed in any commercial ESD grounding device circuit. The resistor will have no real effect on the effectiveness of the circuit. Maintaining a little humidity in the environment might be a better and more effective way to deal with static. Using some dryer sheets can be effective as well. Toss your hulls in a bag with a dryer sheet and hang a small strip in the powder bottle. You can also "wipe down" parts of the loader with one as well.
     
  10. Phil E

    Phil E TS Member

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    In my last house I had the same situation. The way I closed off the crawlspace was by building cabinets enclosing the entire opening between the basement & crawlspace. It was cool year-round, so part of the cabinet became wine storage. I didn't have a humidity or heating problem, so didn't insulate the cabinets, but if you wanted to, you could insulate the crawlspace-side. Then you'd have a smallish work area where you could control the air. In the pole barn, you could hang heavy clear drop-down plastic sheets to seal off a corner, with maybe 2X2 wood stapled to the drop-down end to make it easy to roll up out of the way. Cheap foam-backed indoor-outdoor carpet with a plastic vapor barrier under it helps warm the concrete floor, and thin plywood under it helps even more. Phil E
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    The basement room connects to the crawl space. Simply drive a copper rod into the ground under the crawl space and connect a wire to it and the reloader. A very small wire will work.

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. Shady Creek

    Shady Creek TS Member

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    Good job Pat, and simple. GOOD LUCK
     
  13. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    if you dont control the humidity all the metal parts will rust rick
     
  14. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    I will tell you, your loader will rust. I have the same problem. I choose the shed. For what ever reason my wife will never bother me in here. The basement forget. Ahh honey couldya!!!! I bought a small storage bin big enough gor my loaders sealed up best I could and have a very small dehumidifier inside with a drain tube leading outside. works great loader stopped rusting up. You could possibly build a small room in your barn insulate it possibly even heat it?
     
  15. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I would head to the barn. The more space you have the better. If you are worried about humidity ruining your powder and primers, get a sealed rubbermaid tub to store them in and throw a 'golden rod' dehumidifier in it. If the barn works out you could always frame in a smaller area and install a heater/insulation.
     
  16. midalake

    midalake Well-Known Member

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    I have been loading in my pole barn for 12 years...........no problems. I do always keep my ammo current though no carry overs from the year before. I do not take my powder out of my bottle between loadings either.

    GS
     
  17. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    I consider my garage not much better than your basement. Assuming there's a door on that small room, and there is electricity, why not just leave a light on in the room during moist months. Boaters do that in the cabin of their docked boats and it is enough to keep the moisture at bay. In my garage, I keep primers in a safe with a hot-rod installed, powder in their sealed jugs on shelves, I don't drain the powder bottles after a session but I do try hard to load until they're nearly empty before moving on. No rust problems with two loaders or any other gear. Garage way better than the basement? I dunno, it may not freeze in there but we run soaking wet cars in and out all the time and water from them sits on the floor for days at a time, all in very wet Willamette Valley of Orygun.....Bob Dodd
     
  18. bubba68

    bubba68 Member

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    Thanks to all that replied, I found helpful information from each one.

    I think I will head to the barn, as the wife and I had planned on finishing a few rooms out there anyways. This was just the perfect excuse to move that project up sooner. (Problem will be finding time to reload when I will be too busy building the rooms!).

    Thanks again.
     
  19. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    One advantage (of many) of being unmarried is turning the second largest bedroom into a reloading room. It is comfortable and convenient.

    Don
     
  20. Big Jack

    Big Jack Well-Known Member

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    I've got a single buddy that has his loader bolted to one end of his kitchen table and he eats at the other. Works for him!

    Big Jack
     
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