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RELOADING POWDER BUSHING CHART QUESTION

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by LUGNUTZ426, Oct 30, 2011.

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  1. LUGNUTZ426

    LUGNUTZ426 TS Member

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    WHAT DO YOU DO IF THE AVAILABLE OWDER BUSHINGS FOR YOUR BRAND OF LOADER (IN MY CASE A PW) FALL ON EITHER SIDE OF THE REQUIRED LOAD? FOR EXAMPLE I NEED TO LOAD 13.3 GR AND THE AVAILABLE BUSHINGS GIVE 12.6 0R 14.2GR OF POWDER. SOMEONE SAID GO TO THE ONE THAT DROPS A LITTLE MORE AS IT IS SAFER THAN A LITTLE LESS?
    IS THERE ANOTHER WORKAROUND?

    THANKING YOU IN ADVANCE

    JOE
     
  2. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    Most likely they won't drop what they say anyway. You won't know till you weigh several drops. Typically, bushings will drop less than stated. You have to weigh to know.
     
  3. dhg

    dhg TS Member

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    you could use the hornady bushing chart, they will fit a pw reloader.
     
  4. WesleyB

    WesleyB Well-Known Member

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    Powder is not like other things in life. More is usually not better.
     
  5. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Joe, Borrow a scales and weigh both bushings. Then take the smaller one and use a drimmel to hone it out to your desired weight. Then take the drimmel and mark it so you know what it is. You can also label it with a marker pen.

    Better yet, buy a new bushing and hone that one. That way your original is still good
     
  6. MKillian

    MKillian TS Member

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    Another more controllable way to enlarge a powder bushing is to use a ½" tapered reamer from Sears, a hardware store or Amazon.com. Ream the bottom end of the bushing hold a turn or 2 at a time until you get the drop you want.<center>
    [​IMG]
    </center>

    A ½" reamer will enlarge a bushing up to Hornady number 490. After that you're on your own.

    If you go a little too far (or for a lot od slightly denser powder) a piece of aluminum HVAC tape applied to the inside of the hole will reduce the volume.

    Remember that gunpowder can, and will, vary in weight (density) from one lot to another. A difference of ½ grain up or down is acceptable in a 17 grain formula according to the folks at Alliant powder.

    Mike K
     
  7. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    +1 on tapered reamer. Sears supposedly has them, but me and 2 employees couldn't find it when it was there, so I ended up getting 2 off ebay, one does the powder, one does the shot.
     
  8. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    Now, If it were me I would go with the larger bushing and start painting it with the wifes fingernail polish to close it up. It may take one, or even 2 coats to get it right. Then if you ever need the bushing for a different powder you can always use some fingernail polish remover and your bushing is right back to factory specs. The powder drops will not wear away the polish so your good to go for a long time as well. I will ream out a shot bar for the shot, but I always make the powder bushing smaller. break em all Jeff
     
  9. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    1. Buy a scale and use it.

    2. Call your powder manufacturer and ask them.

    Not sure why anyone would tell you less is not safe.

    I had a similar issue with a load recipe for 28 gauge shells and Universal Clays.

    Hodgdon told me to use the one that throws the lower charge weight. They said I wouldn't be able to tell the difference. They were right.
     
  10. LUGNUTZ426

    LUGNUTZ426 TS Member

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    Thank you all for the great advise. I have a tapered reamer somewhere. I love
    the nail polish idea too. Have a scale on the way. You guys are the best!

    ps. the guy with the advise was a skeet shooter....should have known!

    joe
     
  11. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Tim,

    Using less is dangerous when using a fine grained double based powder. You might get a detonation instead of a burn and blow up your gun. HMB
     
  12. willing

    willing Member

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    I think reaming is a bad way. You are warned that certain powders change w
    weight/volume by lot(Promo). Use the nail polish or tape method and the larger bushing and it can then be changed at any time.
    Bill
     
  13. MKillian

    MKillian TS Member

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    <I>"I think reaming is a bad way. You are warned that certain powders change w weight/volume by lot(Promo). Use the nail polish or tape method and the larger bushing and it can then be changed at any time."</I>

    Reaming is a great way to make a bushing bigger, or, you can start with a bigger bushing and make it smaller with pieces of aluminum foil HVAC tape from a box store or heating supply company. Cut strips the height of the bushing and apply to the inside of the hole after cleaning with lacquer thinner. Sticks great but can be removed if needed.<center>
    [​IMG]
    </center>

    The advantage over nail polish is that you don't have to wait for it to dry completely (it shrinks as it cures) or build it up in layers. It's a much less time consuming process than painting on layer after layer of nail polish and a roll of the tape costs about as much as 2 Hornady bushings an will last forever.

    Mike K
     
  14. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    hmb

    I asked Ron Reiber, one of the top product development guys at Hodgdon about your comment.

    Here's his reply:

    <i>"That is all false! Shotshell loads do not detonate."</i>
     
  15. skeeljc

    skeeljc Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    The best choice is to use Hornady bushings. They are available in .003" increments which is fine enough to zero in on your powder charge.

    Jim Skeel<BR>
    P/W Dealer/Distributor
     
  16. cunninmp

    cunninmp Member

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    Jim Skeel is right. I have a Platinum 2000 and use almost all
    Hornady bushings. At Grafs they are $4.99 each with minimal
    shipping. I'll generally get the exact bushing I need plus one
    slightly lower and one slightly higher for when I change lots of
    powder. On my Spolar and PW have never had a problem hitting the charge I want.

    www.grafs.com

    Mike C.

    Groveland, CA
     
  17. LUGNUTZ426

    LUGNUTZ426 TS Member

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    MORE GREAT INFO. I WILL TAKE IT ALL TO HEART! I THINK I'M GOOD TO GO!

    THANX TO ALL

    JOE
     
  18. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    I have not read all the above responses, but I offer the following:

    I have never been a fan of the "Alpha Identification" system that the P/W factory uses for their bushings. I really like the Hornady system much better. They number their bushing according to the ID of the bushing's inner diameter.

    For example: a 441 bushing has an innder hole diameter of 0.441". Knowing this one can then interpolate from two knows diameters to get a close proximation of their desired load, using the ratio/proportion method.

    I often make custom bushings for my customers based upon their wants, but I normally refer to the Hornady charts to get me to a number to make.

    You can download from my above website the inner diameters of the P/W bushing, if that helps you with a starting point.

    Whiz
     
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