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Reloading manuals... weight or volume?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by gjmen, Feb 2, 2011.

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  1. gjmen

    gjmen Member

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    When reading powder companies reloading data, are the recepies for actual weight, ie 1 oz, 1.125 oz of shot? Or do they take into consideration the reloader is actually dropping a volume based weight not actual weight of the certain charge bar or bushing? I have noticed my mec reloader on an average usually drops about 20 grns light of actual weight(designated bar or bushing) using #8 or #7.5 magnum shot. And if they use actual weight(1oz, 1.125oz etc...), roughly how much does that speed up the fps of the shell if I am dropping lighter than published weight of the charge bar or bushing? I realize this probably varies depending on powder, but curious in how much this could speed up the fps in the published loads of 1 and 1.125 oz shells. Thanks, gjmen
     
  2. Pocatello

    Pocatello Active Member

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    On my Dillon I adjust the powder and shot drops to the specified weight. The powder usually stays within 0.1. gr, the shot within about 3.0 gr.
     
  3. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Yeah, but not all shot is made up exactly of the same quality or weight of the components and different shot can weigh light or heavy based on the components it is made with. Thus, whether the volume is absolutely correct or not, at least it is probably the most consistent way to maintain close to equal shot drops. I do the same as Pokey but then, I use the shot from one source 95% of the time.....bdodd
     
  4. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    many variables. The amount of antimony will affect the weight per given volume. So will the shot size.

    Either get an adjustable bar or use what you got. 20 grains out of 492 is roughly 4 per cent. Your targets lost will come from brainworms, not 4% missing shot.

    HM
     
  5. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    It doesn't really matter much, loading shotgun shells isn't rocket science.

    John C. Saubak
     
  6. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    gjmen

    Like Old Cowboy said, it ain't rocket science.

    If I understand correctly, yes, the tables in the reloading manuals are based on actual weights. But bear in mind, the values for muzzle velocity and pressure are also probably rounded-off averages of a sample of many tests.

    Bushings for shot are based on the volume of the size of CHILLED shot used, and if you are using hard magnum shot, you will be throwing the same volume, approximately the same number of pellets, but the weight will be ever so slightly less.

    How much does that affect the muzzle velocity, assuming you are using the exact amount of powder the loading table calls for?

    Answer: Probably not enough to be able to measure the difference with a chronograph.

    Here's the other thing. If you have shells that are 50 fps slower than the shells you normally use, you probably can't tell the difference anyway.

    My opinion: Find a load you like. Reload it with as much precision as you can (keep your powder charges consistent), and don't worry about it. You're 100 times more likely to miss because you point the gun wrong than to miss because the shell you just shot is 50 fps slower (or faster) than the shell before it.
     
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