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reloading data and receipes

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by peteodie, Mar 7, 2011.

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  1. peteodie

    peteodie Member

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    I am getting into reloading and have looked at the Lyman reloading handbook and looked at the Hodgdon data center. The question is how do you decide the correct selection to use other then the obvious cost of goods. Have not narrowed down where I will shot skeet, trap, sporting, or 5 stand. Is there a standard for shooting each? Thanks for looking and help Pete G
     
  2. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Other than selecting the appropriate load for each discipline, no.

    Since you are a beginner, read both of the books you own. They are both good. The Lyman manual only shows ballistically good loads, and the components fit well. That is not the case with data provided by manufacturers.

    My advice to you is to choose the hull you want to reload, and then use the same primer and wads that manufacturer uses in their loadings. That wad you can be assured of a good fit and nice crimps. Clone wads are an okay substitution.
     
  3. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    When I started reloading I reloaded the same stuff I bought: 1 1/8 oz, 1145 fps, Remington Gun Clubs; I stayed with Remington primers and wads, too.

    After I saw what was available where I bought supplies I started to branch out... still 1 1/8 oz and still Remington hulls but I tried other powders, wads, primers and speeds; some I liked, some I didn't.

    After I reached the point where I could hit what I shot at most of the time I decided to use familiar components but use data for 1 oz. loads. More experimentation (always with published data), more information.

    Now I have a notebook full of records of data I've tried and my impressions of it. Many of my loads have been pressure and velocity tested by Downrange Manufacturing and even though I keep the data for every load I've ever tried, I've settled on a half-dozen or so formulas that I now load exclusively.

    I still occasionally experiment when I get bored. Right now I'm playing with high-speed 7/8 oz data just to see how they perform compared to what I usually use.

    MK
     
  4. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    peteodie:

    Between the thousands of potential recipes a person can load, your personal experience will determine the loads you evenually stick with. While you're gaining some experience, here's a few tips to get you started...

    ALWAYS use recipes published by industry sources. Powder and wad companies are examples.

    ALWAYS use a reliable scale to insure your powder drops are the correct amount/weight.

    Stick with compatible hull/wad combinations. For example, if you load Remington STS hulls, you won't go wrong using a Remington wad. The reason? Remington hulls and Reminton wads have matching tapers and fit together well.

    Winchester AA hulls and Winchester wads are also tapered. You'll find many good recipes using a tapered Winchester wad in a tapered Remington hull - or a tapered Reminton wad in a tapered Winchester hull. Those are all compatible and good loads too.

    Federal Gold Medal hulls and Federal wads are non-tapered. As such, they are compatible and designed to be used together.

    However... you will find published recipes where non-tapered wads (like a Federal 12S0 or 12S3) are loaded in tapered hulls. Or tapered wads (like a Remington Figure 8 or Winchester WAA12SL) is loaded in a straight walled hull. These loads may work but they are NOT optimal combinations.

    Stick with straight wads in straight walled hulls, or tapered wads in tapered hulls.

    As for primers, use whatever your manual calls for in a given recipe. Do NOT substitute one brand of primer for another unless a reliable industry source specifically says it is ok in the SPECIFIC RECIPE you are loading.

    sissy
     
  5. Ross

    Ross Well-Known Member

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    There is probably more difference in the guns than shells. Trap "usually" is shot with a 12ga. choked Mod. or Full & shoots high because you are shooting at a rising target & you will want to see the tgt. above your barrel.---Skeet shoots 4 gauges 12--20--28--&410, with more open chokes, usually flatter shooting (more like a field gun).S.C.s & 5 stand are more like skeet. So I wouldn't worry about the ammo to much, an 1150 to 1200 fps will break anything you are likely to encounter on 98% of the different venues. A good comfortable (for you) gun & ammo combination will serve you well. Most clubs have shot size restrictions of 7&1\2 or smaller, so until you decide which avenue your going to follow I wouldn't go overboard on guns--loaders--etc. try them all, you will most likely find one that you like better than the others. The MAIN thing is to ENJOY. Ross Puls
     
  6. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Rule number one. Get a good, accurate scale.

    Rule number two. Use it.

    After that, its all following the recipes.

    It helps to have a mentor. Find one if you can. Preferably someone who has good sense and doesn't "experiment." And has all his fingers.

    Hulls:

    Stick to the good ones. Winchester AA, Federal Gold Medal, and Remington Gun Club, STS, and Nitro. I am partial to Remington because Gun Club hulls are readily available.

    Primers: They all work. I started with Winchester because that's what my buddy used. I see no reason to change.

    Powder: Alliant and Hodgdon are the big dogs. I like Hodgdon because Chris Hodgdon is a friend of mine. But Alliant makes good products too. Its important to choose a powder that is right for the job. One size does not fit all.

    Wads: Again, they all work, and I subscribe to the opinion there's not a huge amount of difference among them. I like the Downrange wads because Kevin Lewis is a friend of mine. But the factory wads are good, Duster wads are good, lots of folks like Claybuster, but I don't care for them because the make nasty noises in my wad fingers. And the advice above is good, regarding using a wad made for straight walled hulls in straight walled hulls, and likewise with tapered hulls.

    Shot: For trap singles and skeet, just about any old shot will do. For handicap trap, use good name-brand magnum shot. 7-1/2's or 8's will be debated until the end of time, and there will never be a right answer. But use 8-1/2's or 9's for skeet.

    Your mileage may vary
     
  7. xringjim

    xringjim TS Member

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    Just getting started? O.K., here's my 'primer' (no pun intended) for doing it as cheap as possible. Just about any hull can be reloaded once after its first use. Gun Clubs work well as they seem abundent and can be reloaded about five or more times. Graf&Sons and Connies Components are good places to look for your supplies. Now, go out without delay and buy as much shot as you can. And don't be afaid to use reclaimed shot. Just be sure to check out the quality first. Prices are doing nothing but going up on shot and powder. For primers, use Cheddites as they can be had cheaper than others and work just as good as others imo. For powder, use Promo. Great powder and is as cheap as you'll find. Next, wads. I find Claybuster wads work as well as any. As for your load, use a 1oz load. You'll save on shot and if your going to hit a target you'll hit it with 1oz just as much as 1 and 1/8th oz. Saves on your shoulder over time too. For a reloader, find a used 366. These can be had for 225 to 300 used on Ebay or here on Trapshooters from time to time. Once you get that 366, if you have ANY doubts it might need some tuning up, send it off to Hornaday. They will make it work like new and charge you zero. The only money you'll be out is for your shipping cost to send the unit. While you're waiting for that 366 to come back to you, build a bench and work area in which to do your reloading. GL Enjoy yourself, and ALWAYS feel free to ask questions here on this site. Jim Price
     
  8. peteodie

    peteodie Member

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    okay I have hodgen clay powder, win aa hulls, going to try 1 1/8 claybuster wads, and probably get 25 lb of #7.5 shot & 25 lb of #9. on the clays powder it said to use 18.5 gr. found shot for 38 for 25 lbs. Thanks for all the updates and if I don't blow myself up Ha! Ha! we shall go where I have never gone before Pete G
     
  9. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    I suggest you start your loads at a slower speed (1145 fps) and work up.

    High speed loads are harder on shoulders than they are on targets.

    MK
     
  10. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    peteodie

    Clays is not an ideal powder for 1 1/8 oz loads. It's great for 1 oz, but hits the wall, pressure wise quickly with 1 1/8 oz loads. If your loads are limited to 1145 fps, you might be fine. 18.5 grains of Clays sounds a bit much in a tapered hull. Not knowing the primer and the rest of the details, it's hard to say. I would recommend double checking the load data and/or checking with Hodgdon to be sure. I would HIGHLY recommend staying under 9000 PSI or so as a beginner. I do not load target loads over 10,000 PSI. There are enough selections of components that one would not need to push the limits to assemble an adequate load.
     
  11. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    Pete, Clays is a excellent powder to use. My favorite as well. For l l/8 oz. loads at 1150 fps No Problems, for 1200 fps loads make sure your components will keep the pressure below l0,000 psi. and all will be fine. Also try some 8 l/2 shot for skeet and 16-20 yard trap as well. Save the 7 l/2's for sporting clays or long distance trap. I also say use economy primer,powder,wads if you like too and would like to save some money here and there, but always use good shot, as that's what breaks the targets. Some will use reclaimed shot to save money on pratice loads and that is fine. Buy a scale and use it. I too think that your l8.5 grains may be abit to high in chamber pressure with Clays powder. Check your components to lower under l0,000 psi. Good Luck and stay safe. Break-em all. Jeff
     
  12. Greg LV

    Greg LV Member

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    Pete:

    Try this one for sporting ( also a few rounds of trap @ 16 and 20 yds). I have used it with good results.

    12ga Rem STS or Gun Clubs, 1 oz Lead Shot 18.9 grs. Clays, Rem. 209P primer, Rem. TGT 12, 8,100 LUP, 1235 fps

    Greg
     
  13. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Good advice given.

    The short way:

    Big hull, big wad.

    small hull, small wad.

    1 oz for skeet and 16 yd

    1&1/8 for handicap and sporties

    Dont try and put ten pounds of manure in a 5 pound bag. (if the shot is closer than a half inch from the top, find a wad that fits better)

    HM
     
  14. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    Keep in mind that low pressure does not equate to low recoil. What it does equate to is inconsistent powder combustion and erratic velocities. Choose a higher pressure load for the powder you use (they operate in different pressure ranges) as long as it's under 11,500 PSI for a 2¾" hull. The gun can take it and you won't notice any more recoil than you'd feel with a erratic woosy low pressure choice.

    MK
     
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