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Release Trigger Scale - What to buy?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by claycruncher, Apr 10, 2007.

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  1. claycruncher

    claycruncher TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    I want to purchase a scale that will measure the set weight (pounds and ounces) and will also measure the amount of poundage when the trigger is released. What do the gunsmiths use? Is there a scale that has two pointers or registers that will show both the set weight and release weight? Specific brands and places to purchase would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. Jim
     
  2. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    Any trigger pull guage will work for what you're looking for.

    This is what you're looking to achieve....

    Be sure that the gun is EMPTY, and that the gun is cocked. Slip a snap cap into the chamber to help protect the firing pin.

    Place the hook of the gauge onto the trigger, and slowly begin to pull on the scale.

    Just a note: I like to pull the trigger gauge at a 15-20 degree angle up from the barrel's centerline. If you mount your gun and place your finger on the trigger, you'll notice it's not parallel to the bore.

    As the pressure increases, you'll reach a pound or ounce mark on the scale that will "set" the trigger. Most times you'll hear the audible click. This number on the scale will be your release set weight.

    From here, slowly start to release the pressure. Keeping an eye on the scale, notice at the weight that's registered when you hear the hammer fall. This will be the "release weight".

    For most shooters, keeping a minimum of 2 pounds between the "set" and the "release" weight is managable.

    A shooter who says that a release is fast can mean to different scenerios. One can be that the set weight is too close to the release weight.Having the weight too close together, gives no room for relaxing your grip.

    The other is that the release weight is of a high poundage. Having a higher relase weight means you need to maintain more pressure on the trigger while holding it in the set position. This means maintaining 2-1/2 or more pounds on the trigger. If you're a little weak in the trigger hand, this could cause the trigger to slip on ya once in a while.

    A higher SET weight really doesn't hurt anything. It'll work for those who wish for a "slower" release, giving your hand a little break, or for those who wish to have a little quicker release, as long as the 2 pound minimum is still established.

    Doug Braker
     
  3. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    This is the gauge I use. This one max's out at 6 pounds. It can be had at Brownell's.


    <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>
     
  4. claycruncher

    claycruncher TS Member

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    Thanks Doug. It sounds like no one makes a scale that can capture both the set weight and release weight unless it is performed as you describe. Is there a scale that does "record" both weights?
     
  5. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure how a scale could measure AND record the "relase" weight, because you are constantly applying less pressure.

    The scale above does have a "slider" to mark the trigger pull/set weight. It is not difficult at all to watch the scale for the release weight.

    After a couple of attempts, you'll be a pro at it!!


    Doug
     
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