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Reinstalling the feed latch on my 11-87 Trap

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by linkerman, Sep 17, 2009.

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  1. linkerman

    linkerman Member

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    I pulled the trigger out of my 11-87 Trap to clean it and in the process the feed latch also fell out. This is the first time that I hade this happen and I am having a terrible time getting it all back together.

    So, what is the trick to getting the feed latch to stay in place so that I can get the trigger back in?


    Thank very much for your help!!
     
  2. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    It needs to be "staked" in place. There are special tools for that. You can try to hold it in place with the trigger pin and slip the trigger assy over it using a couple of feeler gauges or shims. It really should be repaired properly.
     
  3. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Well, repair it like this. Clean the groove with gun scrubber or alcohol and the latch too. then place the latch in position and put some 5 minute epoxy in the rear 1/3 portion under the latch. It will be hooked in the front properly. Then take some small clamps and hold the latch in place while the glue cures. Overnight is best. This is not my solution, but I hav edone it twice and th esystem works better than "staking"

    i.e.


    [​IMG]


    finished


    [​IMG]


    Use your small trigger pin to locat the proper place fo rthe latch. Put a bit of oil on th pin as a release agent.

    This is easy.

    jack
     
  4. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    cool trick. I always just went in with a long punch and staked it myself.

    HM
     
  5. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    I was always able to use a thin blade knife to hlod th elatch in place while inserting the trigger. But th egleu deal works mucho good. Devcon or any 5 minute glue 2 part glue

    Any real hardware store has clamps like these. I like thise better than C clamps because they do not scratch the receiver.
     
  6. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    I've seen the epoxy trick before. I've also seen what happens when it goes wrong. It's a mess to clean up. :) It is a viable alternative to staking. One day I might think about tack welding one in place. A quick grind can fix the lumps. I have two modified parallel jaw clamps that I use to position the latch. They are padded on the outside jaw and have a protrusion affixed to the opposite jaw to apply pressure on the latch. I position the latch with the trigger pin and stake it in place. I noticed that MIA's picture shows the "round" indentations made by one of the staking tools available. The long indentations like the factory uses would be preferred. I have an offset punch that is great for the purpose. I can't remember if I got it from Brownell's or directly from Remington. I might try the epoxy AND staking routine next time one comes loose.

    One word of caution. Be CAREFUL when putting your fingers inside the 1100/11-87 receivers. There are usually some VERY sharp edges that will cut your fingers with impunity! I can also tell you that blood can ruin the blueing.
    Don't ask me how I know this. :)
     
  7. Ontario Chris

    Ontario Chris Member

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    I did the epoxy thing about 4 years ago on my 1100 and it still holds. One trick to extending the life of the epoxy (or staking for that matter)is to always knock out and insert the trigger pins towards the ejection window on the receiver.

    Chris
     
  8. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    This is an all too common job for gunsmiths. And it's one area where Remington needs to modernize their design. The equivalent bar in a Mossberg is easily removable and requires no staking.
     
  9. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Quack makes a good point. I have wrecked my trigger and middle finger more than once on those interior edges. Now I use a toothbrush to scrub and then spray with Gun Scrubber. Too,. I like Ontario's note on the directions to punch out pins. Had not thought about that. My picture set up did not come out too good but you get the point. on how it works.
     
  10. linkerman

    linkerman Member

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    OK I was able to do a modified version of what Jack had mentioned and supplied the photographs for; I did not use any type of epoxy though. Thanks Jack!!

    My next question:

    I assume that "staking" basically wedges or binds the feed latch in place? What happens if you are able to get everything back together and functioning without using either epoxy or a staking tool? Are their problems that will arise down the road?

    Thank guys for all of your help!!!
     
  11. Ontario Chris

    Ontario Chris Member

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    If you can put it back together and working without staking, it will be OK until the next time that you take the trigger out. The feed latch will be held in place in the x direction by the trigger pins, in the y direction by the channel in the rails, and in the z direction by the trigger assembly. Better to fix it and be done with it. As I pointed out above, when removing/inserting the trigger, knock the trigger pins in the direction of the window and you should have no future problems.

    Chris
     
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