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refinishing a stock

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by bewmetal, Jul 29, 2010.

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  1. bewmetal

    bewmetal Member

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    refinishing a stock and would like some input on what to use? looking for a high gloss finish.

    thanks

    Brett
     
  2. SevenMaryThree

    SevenMaryThree Member

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    For something like that, I would use a reputable stock man.
     
  3. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    Check into a furniture refinishing shop for trade secrets or check into an electric guitar finishing shop for trade secrets. That's where I'd first go if I were to try it myself; figure a stockmaker would not give away his or her hard to come by information of the trade.
     
  4. buck3200

    buck3200 Well-Known Member

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    I found that after 4-5 coats of Polyurethane (for furniture) the trick for hi gloss is a polish with a buffing wheel(in drillmotor) and polishing rouge(?). A kit avail. at Home Depot is what I used.As good or glosser than the old hi-gloss factory remington stocks. I was shocked that thats all it took.I'd been trying to recreate that look since I was a kid.
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    What you use is not as important as how you use it. The critical step is filling all of the pores so you have a nice flat surface to work with. I liked to use a sander sealer for this. It takes many coats and each one has to be sanded nearly off before the next one is applied. Sander sealer dries fast ans is easy to sand.

    This is followed by a few coats of the final finish that are lightly sanded and then polished. I liked to polish with a large soft wheel on my drill press. That only takes a couple of minutes and makes a great mess. I polished with a lot of water, some liquid wood wax and fine automobile rubbing compound. This is the same thing used to polish automobile paints.

    Pat Ireland
     
  6. bobdog

    bobdog Active Member

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    The Perazzi MX2005 shown in the "***WTS Perazzi MX 2005 combo***" thread had a dull Perazzi finish on it when I got it. I used 3M's extra fine rubbing compound, an automotive foam sanding block and lots of time, but it turned out well. I've since done the same thing to an MX2000/10 that turned out better.

    Pat's method would probably give you better results in half the time, as long as you're careful not to get too aggressive with it. One rub-through and you have to start over. I did that on a rifle stock once, and it wasn't fun.
     
  7. buck3200

    buck3200 Well-Known Member

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    That's what I used. But the polishing took it to a WHOLE other level. The finish has that look of depth similar to a hi-quality Candy auto paint job. Amazingly easy and quick to accomplish with the products I used.
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    bobdog- Above you posted "Pat's method would probably give you better results in half the time, as long as you're careful not to get too aggressive with it. One rub-through and you have to start over. I did that on a rifle stock once, and it wasn't fun"

    Yes- one rub through and you do have to start over. That is true during every step of the refinish process. After you do that a few times, you learn when to stop and go to the next step. It is part of the price you pay to learn how to refinish stocks so they look like glass. Also, a stock finished this way will show scratched more than a dull finish.

    Pat Ireland
     
  9. bobdog

    bobdog Active Member

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    Pat-I learned my lesson on my first benchrest rifle stock years ago, a painted McMillan stock that had a rough, sandy finish on it that scratched up my face every time I fired it. A little wet sanding helped, so a little more should be better, right? Turned out it was just one coat of paint. Ended up taking it all the way down to the fiberglass in one spot and had to start over, and that was just paint. You learn as you go, and you get more careful. That's the only stock I'm sorry about. The others have turned out OK, and I'm no stranger to furniture finishes.

    With a factory SC3 Perazzi stock, I figured doing it by hand was safer, since I didn't know how deep the finish was. Besides, I didn't mind spending the time doing it by hand.

    I recall I do have an old leftover Remington 700 rifle stock in the garage somewhere that would make a good test piece. I like the idea of a drill press, because it leaves both hands free to control the piece. I considered just using an electric drill, but realized it would be too hard to control. What kind of a wheel do you use on your drill press? A cloth buffing wheel for a bench grinder or some sort of polishing bonnet? I take it you tape off the checkered areas.

    And you're right about scratches. The prettier the finish, the easier it is to scratch up. Zippers, gun racks, shell bags, doorways, other shooters...doesn't take much and it's back to the rubbing compound.
     
  10. Mark425

    Mark425 TS Member

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    My other hobby is building and finishing furniture. In the 30 years of finishing I have done, I have yet to find a poly that doesn’t have a blue cast/haze to it and doesnt look like what is...... plastic. Having done dozens of gunstocks and hopefully learned something from my many mistakes, I would never use poly on a nice stock for the reasons I just stated. For high gloss, I like Permalyn Gun Stock Finish but it takes many many many of coats with lots of labor and time. In the end it’s beyond wonderful if you like glossy finishes. The next best thing, especially if you haven’t done a stock before is good old Tru-Oil. Tru-Oil is fairly easy to use and even easier to repair. Poly is near impossible to repair, without a complete recoat.

    http://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=136366

    This guy did a nice Tru-Oil redo with step by step instructions and pictures.


    [​IMG]
     
  11. teddy34

    teddy34 TS Member

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    Another nice thing about tru-oil, if your tastes change to wanting
    less gloss and more of a dull finish, it is easy to dull with some fine
    steel wool. Thanks, Gary
     
  12. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Premalyn is best. At least 90 coats. Tru-oil has a green tint in bright sunlight, I never liked it.
     
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