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red setter dogs

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by wpairishshot, Apr 24, 2011.

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  1. wpairishshot

    wpairishshot Member

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    This is my second attempto to get this going. I dont know if there is a problem or if I am not posting properly or what.
    I am looking for any and all who have had experience hunting with, training, or just having owned a red (irish) setter. I am about a week away from getting one of these dogs with true hunting lineage. I have had setters from "dual lines" and they were big running dogs, all the time. I hope to find this one works a bit closer to me.
    Any and all experiences with the breed please give me your impressions. Oh yeah, and please dont try to tell me to get a different breed. Not interested.
    Thanks. Kevin McIlwain
     
  2. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I have had them- from one that looked like a smaller irish setter to small sprites in the 45 pound range

    I had good luck with them.

    Gene
     
  3. skeezix

    skeezix Member

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    you might check out the versatile dog forums at http://www.versatiledogs.com/forum/index.php

    They are pretty knowledgable about the various breeds.

    I think there is an Irish setter forum out there somewhere that caters to the recovery of the hunting breed.

    I think the red setters, along with the weims, and the goldens all got breed to be pretty and the hunting lines have been hurt. But there are some very good folks out there trying to recover the hunting lines. I wish you well. I have a long haired wiem myself - he looks like a grey setter. He's just about as nuts as the setters are reported to be too :)

    john
     
  4. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    My dogs hunted with one a few years back in NW Ohio at a game club. It was a red setter, not your normal Irish. Smaller dog with less hair. It was a medium range dog, trained well.

    I think you would be better off to spend extra time checking out the breeder, his stud and bitch, and maybe hunt with some dogs he has produced. Good dogs breed good dogs, and the breeder determines the quality of pups by selecting the breeding pair. With some good training you can hack almost any dog back to 20 yards.

    Even my big lumbering Ryman setter will push the track of a running bird too fast if I let him. But he will stop on a whistle or whoa. That's a result of training, not breed.
     
  5. One Eyed Left Handed

    One Eyed Left Handed TS Member

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    I'd have to second Setterman, who gave very sound advice. I'd add that his advice would be valid on all hunting or retrieving breeds.

    Eddie Quire
     
  6. R.Kipling

    R.Kipling Well-Known Member

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    I come from a Big Red family. We've raise, or should I say we've had 7 that have raised us. Best family and kid-dog you could find. The breed got really bred thin in the 80's. There is a movement afoot right now to bring in several European hunting blood lines.

    Our first Red came from hunting stock and my son actually put him in some field trials with some success. I have some great memories of hunting over that dog. Excellent pointer and he even learned to work close - after you let him burn off a little steam.

    Be extra choosy and particular about your breeder and the blood line.

    Kip
     
  7. Mapper

    Mapper Member

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    My cousin has had several, including some black(mixed breed) ones. Generally, her dogs are a bit crazy, but she doesn't hunt them, so she doesn't care. They are very smart and if you can find a kennel that caters to hunting dogs, get one. Pay someone to train the dog, if you can't. Your family will be safe as long as the dog lives.
     
  8. JB Logan Co. Ohio

    JB Logan Co. Ohio TS Member

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    wpairishshot- I have been raising Irish Setters for 32 or 33 years although in all that time I have NOT trained one for field hunting. They have all been personal pets. Can't give you much help on (field) training them but I feel qualified to give you some insight on the breed. I agree with R. Kipling and Setterman as to doing due diligence on the breeder and the lineage of what ever pup you select. I believe this to be of great importance in whatever end result you are seeking (field, show, family pet). As a general rule, yes the breed can be a bit stubborn. I tend to think of it as being somewhat misunderstood. They have a heart of gold when they choose to let you into it. Some of mine have done so early and some late. Patience in basic training is foremost as is acclamation to other animals and your family. As you are probably well aware they need lots of exercise. Not just a quick walk but an extended run in the woods, field or swim in the lake for hours about twice a week. Mine (I have a new pup ((Tess,7 mos.)) and a 6 yr. old English Setter, Lilly) accompany me to the gun club to work on the sporting clays course at just about every opportunity. They let me know whem they're ready to go home, warm up and eat/sleep. Her (the Irish's) behavior is much better after enough exercise.

    They are very much a one master dog and you have to be the ALPHA! They will obey others but usually look to you for the OK (or the "Do I have to?") They enjoy the family "pack". One usually has to remind them of their place in that pack. They mostly want to be with you at all times. I brought the previous Irish(I lost her to bo ne cancer on Dec. 12 of 2010)and the English to a Zone shoot and tied her up to the trailer so I could classify and squad. Earlier in the English's life she taught then older Irish how to chew through their ropes and find me at our club (when I would be in a traphouse fixing something). Anywho I had classified and was waiting in line to pay after squadding when McKenzie (the Irish) pads up to me and sits down next to me as if it was her job to accompany me in the payline. Lilly was still tied up with her wire rope. Some of the red dogs I've had a harsh word was like beating them with a club while others needeed more of a firmer hand. Just enough to know they've not done what you've wanted. They will want to please you.

    I guess I have rambled on for too long but who ever you decide to bring home I'm sure with a bit of patience and lots of loving they will become what you want to mold them into. Good luck and let's see some pictures when you get your pup!

    Sincerely, JB=Jerry Beach 8503917
     
  9. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    Call Berg Brothers. They have some very nice Red Setters. They are into English Setters as well and are real bird dog people. My experience with them has been excellent not only with regards to their dogs but also with their business practices. I dealt with Scott Berg.
     
  10. hrosik123

    hrosik123 Member

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    I don't know to much about the breed so all I can say is training is paramount. Early and often. I feel that you can train a dog to work closer than its genetic disposition. Your degree of sucess will vary on the work you put into it. Make sure you have good stock and training should fall into line. The instincts will take over. As with all training basic obedience is first and foremost. Make it fun and the dog should be a pro in no time. Good luck Chuck Hrosik
     
  11. DONNE

    DONNE Member

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    I assume you already know the difference between an AKC and a field bred dog. If you truly want a field bred Red Setter then I'd suggest contacting Dr. Roger Boser of Seven Valleys PA. He's been successfully trialing Red Setters for quite some time. I've seen a few of his dogs run and they rank right up there.

    As far as hunting distance goes , you train the dog while he is young as to what distance you want him to hunt at. Many of the Pro trainers will give up some pretty good hunting dogs because they don't range out far enough for horseback field trial competition. I'd suggest you find yourself a club or someone in your area that has experience training birddogs. Its easier training a dog with a little help. Good Luck ...........
     
  12. Martinpicker

    Martinpicker Active Member

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    I got my first bird dog for my eighth birthday,(an English Setter,) and still have one at my feet today,(a Brittany). As much as I have loved all the dogs I have had, the best I ever hunted with was an Irish Setter named Luke that belonged to my Dad's best friend. I was a teenager and I hunted that dog for hours and days on end. He was a big chested dog that looked a little like a red Golden Retriever in shape. I haven't seen his like in years! Good luck. Martinpicker
     
  13. Mdl1261

    Mdl1261 Member

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    This is my 3rd Irish in 35 yrs of raising them. The first two were outstanding hunters,companions and loyal friends. Give them the Love they deserve and they'll give back ten fold.They are easy to adapt to the field as they are to the house. This present one came from a no-kill shelter she was abused (got her when she was 1 1/2 ) she's 3 now and has one hell of a nose for upland birds. Just love her to no end ....
     
  14. Stickdp

    Stickdp Member

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    Any dog is only as good as his trainer-- you can get the best pup in the litter and if your training sucks so will your dog.
     
  15. wpairishshot

    wpairishshot Member

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    Just wanted to say a big Thank You to all who replied. Our new red setter, Jack, is home here with us. He is 12 weeks old. Also comes from the "Come Back" lineage. He talks like a big dog already, and I have seen him on point in the yard already.
    Hope all is well with you guys. I appreciate you taking the time to answer this thread.

    Kevin McIlwain
     
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