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Recurve Archery

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by foghorn220, Sep 4, 2007.

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  1. foghorn220

    foghorn220 Active Member

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    Im sure I will be of no help I used to have a Hoyt Recurve bow that was used in the olymips in the 1980's and I tried it once and was aiming at a target and the arow stuck between the fron and back door of my surbaban but it was dead center of the post between the doors but that wasn't my target.

    Foggy
     
  2. Pocatello

    Pocatello Active Member

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    Try here (link above). They have all the info/supplies you could ever want.
     
  3. buzzgun

    buzzgun Member

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    Tom,

    I was where you're at a couple years ago...I made the switch, started going to tournaments, and it's a great sport. I'll try and give you a couple tips, things that nobody told me when I was starting with a recurve (but wish they had).

    The best place to buy from is Lancaster Archery Supply. They are awesome & carry everything for every kind of archery. No place else comes close. Their 2007~2008 catalog is 260 pages, and a great piece of reading when you're learning and selecting equipment. Their tech people are very good at helping you set up equipment combinations. Once they know what bow setup you're shooting, they can custom-make you a dozen arrows that are perfectly matched to it for only about $20 extra, and that's the best $20 of archery money you'll ever spend. DO NOT just go buy arrows off a shelf at Dick's or something like that! It would be like shooting trap weak-handed...the arrows have to match your bow weight pretty much exactly if you want to hit.

    If you want to start with a basic recurve set up with not too much money, a good choice for a starter bow would be the PSE Optima recurve. I don't know how tall you are, but the Optima comes in lengths up to 66" and for an adult man, that would be a perfect size for starting out (I'm 6'1" and shoot a 70" setup, but that's a full Olympic rig...most male shooters are shooting 68~70"). The complete Optima rig is $165 (riser + limbs), and comes in weights of 20/20/30/35 pounds...you can buy extra (different weight) limbs for $83 per pair. (It's like trapshooting, you will upgrade your toys eventually...).

    About the draw weight on those limbs...this is where the controversy begins. I would recommend you start out with 30# instead of 35, regardless of your strength. In the beginning, proper form means more than anything, and it's impossible to teach the right muscles to come into play if you're thinking about the draw effort or the strain on your fingers (the Korean national team has their young shooters start learning archery physiology with light elastic bands months before ever picking up a real bow...and their Olympic program pretty much rules the world right now). Start low, and work your way up...it's just like handicap trapshooting, do not increase, until you've mastered the previous poundage (jump to "27 yds." too quick in trap, you just embarrass yourself...jump up in poundage too quick in archery, and you injure yourself). You can probably pull 30 without thinking about it, and that's exactly what you want. Believe me, there are more archery-related injuries from people starting out with too much weight than you would believe. I jumped into 38~40 right off when I began...I didn't listen to the experts, and I paid dearly for it...my fingers started going numb, etc., and had to back off in weight to regain/relearn proper form. Do yourself a favor and start on the light side, not heavy! It is recommended that you not increase your poundage more than 2 lbs. a month while you're working up as a beginner, and that's if you're shooting daily.

    A moderate weight-lifting regime has proven very helpful for me...but no need to over-do it. Bow-time is more important. US Coach Kisik Lee has his archers doing an hour a day of static strength and endurance training with extra weight bands attached to their bows, and he feels this is better than weights because it's sport-specific.

    Small equipment items...the $2.50 Hoyt stick-on plastic arrow rest is as good as anything, even some Olympians still use it..and make sure to get a spring-plunger and get educated in its use (no need to get the $100 Beiter micrometer click-unit...just get a $24 cheapie to start).

    Two equipment factors are _crucially_ important to get any satisfaction out of the sport for a beginner (there are many others too, but you cannot get off the ground without these two...). They are having the correct arrow spine (stiffness) for your poundage, and tuning your bow to the correct brace height (distance from string to riser before drawing). In a recurve bow, the arrow must flex and bend itself AROUND the riser as it's being fired (look up "Archer's Paradox" on the Internet), and if your arrow spine and brace height are not matched to your poundage, the arrow will not clear the riser and you won't hit S#$%. (This is as important, no, more important, than patterning a shotgun). I won't go into equipment tuning, as it's a subject unto itself, but please do yourself a favor and let the experts at Lancaster or your pro shop choose your arrow spine for you based on your poundage and the arrow charts (since you're a beginner and don't know your draw length yet, they'll have to guess based on your size, unless you can get your draw length measured at a local archery pro shop).

    When you get your equipment up and running, measure your brace height every time you string up the bow for a shooting session, and especially with a new string that isn't broken in and stretched yet, re-check frequently as you shoot...(I wish somebody would have told me this). Stay within manufacturer's recommendations. When the bow is tuned halfway decent, keep the same brace height every time (your groups can shift tremendously if the brace height differs from one session to the next...because the bow will be "letting go" of the arrow at a different place in its vibration cycle).

    Get yourself a GOOD, THICK finger tab. The fingers are the weakest part of the equation for a beginner. I've only recently gotten the feeling back in one of my fingers as a result of my initial training mis-steps, so be careful and listen to your fingers. One of USA's current World Cup shooters recommended to me to use at least 1mm of tab thickness for every 10 pounds of limb weight, and that's probably right on. (Again, on draw weight...don't let your muscles write checks your fingers can't cash).

    For more information, there is a great book called "Fundamentals of Recurve Target Archery - Getting Started in the B.E.S.T. Method," by Ruth Rowe (US Olympian, Pan Am Gold Medalist & national champion). 150 pages, about $18 from 3 Rivers Archery...best book for the beginning recurve archer I've ever seen. Covers all aspects of equipment, and the fine details of how each part of your body should look & feel as you properly execute the shot sequence. Get this book before doing anything else!

    It's a great sport, and as the man said above, you can't beat the cost of the ammo! (once the initial cost is paid for, anyway). I'm by no means an expert archer yet, but I've studied hard for 2 years, been hitting the 2-day indoor & outdoor tournaments, and even have a trophy or two to set next to my trapshooting ones, and it's been rewarding every step of the way. When I finally made it back to the full 90-meter FITA distance, and could walk down to the target and find all my arrows in it...let me tell you, that was a greater moment for me in my shooting than getting punched to the 27. Just something about watching that little black arrow hurtle up into the heavens, hover there a couple seconds, then re-enter the atmosphere and stick in the center of that 90-meter bull is intoxicating. I have the highest respect for the top trapshooters...but not one of them could carry the gear bag of the elite recurve archers, in terms of their physical training and their skill of shot execution - no contest. They are awesome at a level that a GAH HOA champ couldn't begin to touch, in my opinion.



    Good luck, good shooting, and let us know how it turns out...

    bzz

    (PS - when you're really ready to "snatch the marbles," pick up a copy of my book, "Bow Fitting Secrets.")
     
  4. OleBlue2

    OleBlue2 TS Member

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    Hey Tom
    Buzz gave you great advice,
    I am not sure where your from but you mentioned sauk trail archery. There is a archery shop I used to visit alot in tinley park called fredie bear sports. You can learn alot from them boys, I haven't been there in a while but they were good to me.
    I would also do an internet search for custom recurves, this will give you bow makers and they can and will help you.
    There are some magazines on traditional archery and primative archery. There are aslo some very good books
    Byron ? He is a trick shooter he has a good book, Instinctive shooting by M.r. james is an excellent book, I beleive he has written 2 more and the Wenzel brothers have a great new web site www.brothersofthebow.com.
    hope this helps,
    I do have a super nice custom made take down recurve, I would sell it's 60lb @30in draw. but you may want to heed buzz's advice and work into it. If you want you can give me a shout and maybe I can help you with some question.
    Bill
     
  5. mearss1

    mearss1 TS Member

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    tomk2 - Great sport. I would add that you take a look at:

    http://people.montana.com/~hhill/legend.html

    for a quick recap of the archer who did it all - The Great Howard Hill. I once saw him place a bung-tipped arrow into the bung hole of a floating beer keg. The man was the best with the bow. Did it all, hunted it all.

    skip
     
  6. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I have not found archery to be too difficult. With just a little practice, I can shoot a cross bow reasonably accurately. I even have a compound bow and I have shot several deer with it. My longest shot was nearly 12 yards. I killed the other deer closer. My greatest challenge was not falling through the 24X24 hole in the floor of my tree stand. That hole was only intended to shoot through, not fall through. Did you know that if you pull down the fence wires between the woods and the apple orchard right under the tree stand deer will walk under the stand? I quit hunting a long time ago but my tree stand is still in place. It looks like a large outhouse with only one hole in the floor.

    Pat Ireland
     
  7. N. J. BOB

    N. J. BOB Active Member

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    I don't know anything about archery other then it looks like a lot of fun, but it sure sounds like buzzgun does. I would take his advice...
     
  8. Bluzman98

    Bluzman98 Member

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    I started archery about 14 months ago and I am hooked. Maybe it was all the trapshooting, but it came very easy to me. I started with a compound bow and was shooting 2" bullseyes consistently from 20-30 yards within a week. I have shot several deer and wild hogs.....what a "rush".

    I will warn you that it is a addictive as trapshooting except much less expensive AND, depending where you live, you can do it in your backyard.

    BTW.....very cheap reloading costs.....lol

    JMHO

    Jim C
     
  9. jimx200

    jimx200 Member

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    Recurve shooter here. Bought a Sammick Spirit, 60" length, 45lb. draw, and love this sport(btw, I'm 6-2/215 lots of gym time to keep strong). I'm lucky to have a nice outdoor range 4 blocks from my house too. Archery has helped fill my void of the Sacramento Trap Club closing. I still shoot trap, but certainly not as much when club was open.
    I shot arrows in the 1970's and then stopped. Now I'm having more fun just shooting arrows, walking around an outdoor simulated hunting range, and enjoying the quiet nature of the sport.
    BTW, the Samick bows are Korean or Taiwan made...excellent quality. If it were me starting out, I would go for a 35#, 66" target bow. They can be found at the $150. range. Like Buzz posted, good quality arrows (feathered) are a must have.
    And like others posted above, it's darn fun to place arrows inside the circle at 60'. Have fun....it's a great sport.
     
  10. jimx200

    jimx200 Member

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    My bow...www.samicksports.com/e_sub_02_02_03.htm
    Check out some great deals here...www.fsdiscountarchery.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWCATS&Category=32
     
  11. grammie

    grammie TS Member

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    Tomk2:

    You won't find arrows spined for a 35lb draw recurve just anywhere!!! In most/all states a draw weight that low is illegal for hunting,,,that leaves you with cheap wooden arrows,,custom made arrows,,or your own make...

    Because of the "let-off" with a compound bow,,,,very few people can master the art of traditional archery with a compound...(traditional archery) is no sights,,no mechanical release...

    Once you start shooting a compound bow with sights,,,the chances of becoming "good" with a recurve without aids is almost impossible...

    When I started shooting with a recurve,,,the bow was taller than I was,,,I had to wrap myself around it,,bend it,,and then have my little brother string it for me!!! I started shooting right off my front porch at small targets,,,every single day for the next several years,,,my fingers hurt,,my arm had a perpetual bruise that lasted for months,,but I was just a kid,,and the prospect of shooting 12 dozen arrows per day was something I enjoyed,,,and that is what most adults CAN NOT DO!!! Why???? Because its damn boring!!!

    It was a natural progression that led to targets further and further away until hitting a 2ft sq piece of foam from 80 yards was "nothing",,,I hunted every game animal allowed with a bow,,,including pheasants,,,wood ducks off the rivers,,squirrels,,ground hogs,,carp,,you name it,,,I shot at it!!!

    The only thing you need besides a bow,a few dozen arrows,,,is----desire!!!

    You can read until your eyes water,,you can spend thousands on top notch equipment,,and custom made bows,,but in the end,,,you have to "want"!!! Just like trapshooting,,,100 straight can be run with a 300 dollar gun as easily as with a 10,000 dollar perazzi,,the gun isn't worth a damn without desire....

    AKA Grammie..........
     
  12. lightfoot

    lightfoot TS Member

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    I shot a 30lb re-curve during the early 1980s. My “sight” was a pin stuck into a piece of weather stripping.

    This thread has sparked my interest again.
     
  13. Bluzman98

    Bluzman98 Member

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    Bazooka Joe

    What is your screen name on AT.com? I am a regular visitor to the site. I have met some great people there, got exceptional help, and bought some excellent used equipment at very good prices.

    Jim Cruz
    aka Bluzman on AT
     
  14. grammie

    grammie TS Member

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    I do beleive that Olympic Archery is 40lb draw weight,,,wooden arrows that you see in the stores that run about 90cents to a dollar apiece are spined for about a 20 to 25lb weight,,,,carbon arrows are stiffer and smaller in diameter than alluminum of the same spine and are relatively cheap,,But yes,,good arrows for that draw weight are much easier to find than something lower that very few people shoot anymore.....

    But thats not to say that you cannot shoot them from a 35lb bow,,,but distance and accuracy is hindered...Shooting cheap wooden arrows from a heavy draw bow,,can be dangerous to you,,and anyone around if it shatters upon release...arrows bend considerably upon release so it is far better to have at least an arrow spined within ten pounds of your draw weight....

    AKA Grammie...
     
  15. PerazziMX2000

    PerazziMX2000 TS Member

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    go to tradgang.com you can get any question answered by people of great knowledge in relation to traditional archery..I personally hung up my compound about 10 years back and now shoot mostly a longbow but own a couple recurves that I shoot from time to time,don't miss the compound 1 bit.
     
  16. ftlupton

    ftlupton TS Member

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    Fred Asbell was married at one time to my cousin and he was super interesting to talk to. He is a traditional shooter only and can he ever tell you stories about his hunting prowess. They are backed up with books and the pics from the books tell the story. I have a 55# Howatt that is like new but it now hurts my shoulder to draw it. Am going to trade down or to a compound. Interesting people and fun to shoot a bow. Good thread!
    ftlupton
     
  17. Pocatello

    Pocatello Active Member

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    Fred Asbell was President of the Pope & Young Club for quite a few years. He had his own bow company when he lived in Colorado - I want to say Bighorn Archery, but I won't swear to it. He authored a couple of books on traditional archery and instinctive shooting.
     
  18. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    tomk2 I shot Archery with a Recurve Bow for over 20 years about 14 of those years were in tournament. I started out shooting scores in the 100 point range (out of a possible score of 560 in field Archery) and finished my career with scores over 500 all I might add without the benefit of a sight. With that being said I have some advise for you.

    I don't care how you shoot or what you shoot if you have a desire to shoot a Bow in competition or not do it. It makes no difference what kind of a bow you shoot or what size arrows as long as they are matched to your draw and bow weight. There are few things in this world that can compare to hitting the target consistently when it is just the bow you and your eyes and an arrow. It in my opinion can not be described.

    I might add that after I put down the recurve I picked up a Compound Bow and shot a few more years in tournament and shot some very good scores on a local level I was considered to be a very good shot.

    I finally put the Bow down for good when I realized that I was not shooting for my own entertainment but to try and keep the skeptics from asking what happened to you your score is way down for you. Then I realized I was not satisfying myself so I retired. So my advise is DO IT but do for you and have fun with it. Good Luck

    Bob Lawless
     
  19. buzzgun

    buzzgun Member

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    Tomk2,

    You can get high quality aluminum/carbon composite target arrows that will spine properly all the way down into the high 20's poundages...just go to Easton.com, and print yourself off a copy of their spine chart. Once you know your arrow length (one side of the table), and poundage (other side of the table), you just cross-reference into the table to find your correct spine rating for your length & poundage.


    Easton.com also has a super "Arrow Tuning and Maintenance Guide" that you can download from their site as a .pdf file (about 40 pages)...it's the standard of the industry, and every serious archer has (or should have) a copy laying around (covers both recurve and compound tuning).
     
  20. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    Someone on this thread mentioned the Great Howard Hill I think it was M511819. Some very interesting things about Howard Hill he never shot a recurve for affect he shot Longbows. He never shot under a 75lb bow. He shot at least 100 arrows everyday of his life for over 50 years. He was (and I think this is the most impressive) the first White man to kill an Elephant with a bow. He also performed shooting feats for the movies in such movies as The Adventures of Robin Hood with Errol Flynn. They Died With Their Boots On also with Errol Flynn and the list goes on. Anything you can read about Howard Hill is good reading.

    Bob Lawless
     
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