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Recoil and Defibrillators

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by mqaqmontana, Sep 9, 2007.

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  1. mqaqmontana

    mqaqmontana TS Member

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    I recently had a Pacemaker/Defibrilator put in my left chest. Being a left handed shooter, I've been told that I will have to learn to shoot right handed. I have been shooting for about 55 years and can't seem to get the right hand thing down. Master eye is too dominant, I guess.
    Is there some sort of recoil system available to reduce the recoil of a Remington 1100, 12 Ga. to acceptable levels? Is there anyone out there that has this same situation?
    Any information would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks, Mike Quinn
     
  2. Billster

    Billster TS Member

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    As an RN in a large Cardiac ICU and open heart surgery, I've gotta tell ya, I wouldn't play around with shooting left-handed with that AICD in there. Just my thought. Good luck with whatever you decide. What a dilemma.

    Cheers
    Bill
     
  3. Texshooter

    Texshooter Member

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    Why didn't you/don't you have it placed on the right side? It might be moved. AJ
     
  4. Jerry944t

    Jerry944t Well-Known Member

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    DO NOT shoot from the left shoulder if you have a AICD placed on that side as was suggested by others. What WILL happen is that the leads that connect to your heart will eventually, maybe sooner than later, fracture and the device will become useless.

    You will need to learn to shoot right handed at this point. As was pointed out the AICD could have been placed on either side depending on your anatomy but there is no way your doctor or your insurance company will move it after initial placement.

    When I had mine placed the doctor told me that he would try to place it on my left shoulder (I'm right handed) but if he couldn't he would place it on my right side. I signed a waiver saying that it could not be placed on my right shoulder, period. The doctor wasn't pleased but when I woke up it was placed where I had requested.

    If we couldn't have been placed it on my left side we would have had to treat my condition another way.

    I feel your pain but it can save your life and with determination you can probably learn to shoot again. Best of luck!

    Jerry
     
  5. smartass

    smartass TS Member

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    You would be smart to talk to a doctor, not strangers who probably don't have a clue, but would never admit that fact.
     
  6. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    I have a friend that has a 2nd rib installed like an outrigger on a canoe.

    That way you can still use your left eye while mounting it on your right shoulder. Otherwise, a bent stock is in your future.
     
  7. mqaqmontana

    mqaqmontana TS Member

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    Thanks all for the info. I kinda knew what the answer would probably be, but thought someone might have a remedy.
    Thanks again, Mike
     
  8. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    My best friend is gone now but I had occasion to follow this subject blow by blow. He had ventricular defib for years, and had medicine, shock treatments, etc. Finally he had a pacemaker installed on the left side, since he was right handed. He shot a 682, 32 inch 2 piper. He did fine, and no problems.

    Unfortunately, the doctor sort of messed up, and the pacemaker was not anchored correctly.

    It moved around some, and created an infected pocket in the area. so then he had to have another one installed on the right side. Because of his shooting, they accomodated him somewhat by moving it down and in, tucked under the chest muscle. At that time he started shooting a Shooter's Emporium 303. NO problem, especially with one ounce loads, even though he had the pacemaker on the right.

    And then he died of cancer. Ain't that a kick in the butt.

    Hope this gives you some insight into how to deal with your situation. Too bad it's done already, I would have had it put in on the off side.

    Good luck

    HM
     
  9. Dave P

    Dave P TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I have a Defib/pacemaker and I know how it feels when it goes off. I also know what it feels like to wrestle with your Grand kids and one kicks the device by accident. Early on with my device I went to classes at the hospital to learn of esperiences. Wear of wires by repeated usages like a golf swing, bowling and typing were examples given. All were subjected tomultiple or continuous shocks. Even if you could do it my friend my guess is you'd only get one shot off before you fell to the ground from the pain(not)shock. Accept the fact and work from there. Dave P
     
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