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rebuilding 1100 trap

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by plott hound, Jan 16, 2010.

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  1. plott hound

    plott hound TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2007
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    Anyone know where I can get ALL the parts to totally rebuild my wifes classic trap ?
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,430
    e-gun parts or Remington can supply the parts.

    It would be cheaper to buy a new gun and keep the old one as a backup.

    That said, I would take the gun apart and replace any broken parts, and put a new action spring in. The rest of the parts do not go bad and can be cleaned and reused. HMB
     
  3. missemucho

    missemucho Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    421
    Cheaper to go to a pawn shop and buy a stock 1100 for parts; they're like a car--a lot cheaper to buy in one piece than by the part!
    John
     
  4. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    plotthound, as above says, its easier to buy one out of a pawn shop and junk it down. Most have had very little use as the were hunters. Then what you don't desire can be sold here or other forums. Done right, you'll have very little if any in the rebuild.

    Do you run plotts?
     
  5. kirbythegunsmith

    kirbythegunsmith Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Messages:
    192
    The detail that I tend to find is that sometimes a used gun sold to (and at) a place such as a pawn shop may very well have been malfunctioning in some aspect or have parts broken or missing.

    A nice example: somebody brought me an 1100 to fix that had been reworked by a butcher. The action spring tube had been broken off and then was crudely arc-welded to the frame. The domino effect of problems from there was considerable. This is the exception, rather than the rule, but you should always try to to get a return privilege to minimize the chance of being stuck with some pig before you have the chance to have a professional inspection.

    When I rebuild these guns, I will tell the owner about the vintage of certain parts and the need or lack of need to replace so the owner is not replacing parts still able to function, but has the option (and the ability) to decide about older version parts and wear conditions present.

    The special work that I do to smooth burrs, rough edges, and wear points is meant to increase the wear life and reliability to a level unlike what you can expect from a typical example of whatever is being improved, whether an 1100, 742, Mossberg 500, Marlin lever rifle, or Citori, as some examples. You can never expect a mechanism to "wear itself in" to a better condition than one that has been "optimized" to keep the wear at a very low level of progress. Some parts inside mechanisms may fail to improve in smoothness or may resist dulling due to the greater hardness present in some parts. A few may actually resist a file, so you know that sharp burr on there will likely stay sharp for a very long time and in the case of an 1100 (or other semi-auto), act as a powered scraper with every shell.

    When you calculate the cost of cleaning and action smoothing vs. what it costs each week for shooting (maybe $50 or more for 100 rounds at sporting clay/trap/skeet), then realize what might be the cost of just a month or so of shooting could be applied to greatly extend the wear life of just about any conventional firearm. Everybody has heard of a guy planning an expensive hunting venture and then not buying the premium rifle ammunition to maximize the chances of success upon arrival. Food for thought.

    Kirby
     
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